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Full text of "Annual report of the Minnesota Historical Society, to the Legislature of Minnesota, for the year .."

REYNOLD^ H'^TORICAL 
GENEALOGY COLLECTION 



ALLEN COUNTY PUBLIC LIBRARY 




3 1833 01077 1159 



ANNUAL RE PORT 

OF THE 

MINNESOTA 
HTSTORTfiAL SOOTETY , 

TO THE 

LEGISLATURE OF MINNESOTA. 
FOR THE YEAR 18 6 7. 




500 COPIKS OKDl^UBli PKINTEL).- 



I'UKSS PRINTING COMPANY 
1868. 



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MINNESOTA 



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L 15 G I S L A T U 1{ E F M. 1 iN iN E S T A . 
FOR THE YEAR 18 (17. 

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500 COPIES OJiDERED PKlN'n:D 



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ST. PAUL: 



(h »» U K 8 S V \l 1 N 1 I X G C O M V ANY. \ 

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Rooms of the Minnesota HiSTOiacAL Society, ) 
Saint Paul, January 2, 1868. 5 

His Excellency, William R. Marshally Governor of Min- 
nesota : 

Sir: — In accordance with the custom hitherto observed, 
of requiring the Executive Council of the Minnesotca Histor- 
ical Society to report the manner of the expenditure of the 
annual appropriation of $500, and the operations and condi- 
tion of the society, in order to be by the Governor laid before 
the Legislature, I herewith submit the Annual Report of the 
Executive Council, for tlie year 1867, containing a full and 
detailed statement of said particulars. 

I have the honor to be. 

Your obedient servant, 

. J. FLETCHER Wn.LIA]\IS, 

Secretary. 



Digitized by tlie Internet Archive 
in 2013 



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I 



OFFICERS FOR 1868. 



PRESIDENT. 

GOV. WILLI A]\I R. MARSILU.L. 

VICE-PRKSTDENTS. 

1. MAJ. GEN. H. H. SIBLEY, 

2. A. H. CATIICART, 

3. REV. JOHN IRELAND. 

SECRETARY. 

J. FLETCHER WILLIAMS. 

TREASURER. 

PETER BERKEY. 

EXECUTIVE COUNCIL. 



REV. JOHN MATTOCKS, 

CAPT. R. BLAKJSLEY, 

S. Y. McMASTERS, D. D.,LL.D., 

HON. H. M. RICE, 

D. W. INGERSOLL, 

JUDGE s. J. R. McMillan, 

D. A. ROBERTSON, 
HON. A. GOODRICH, 
HON. JNO. D. LUDDEN, 
DR. C' DeMONTREVILLE, 



CHARLES E. MAYO, 

GEO. A. HAMILTON, 

JAMES P. POND, 

WM. H. KELLEY, 

WM. B. DEAN, 

ROBERT O. SWEENEY, 

HENRY H. EAMES, 

A. J. HILL, 

S. B. WOOLWORTH, 

And the officers of the Society. 



REPORT'OF THE EXECUTIVE COUNCIL. 



In presenting the thirteenth annual report of the Society, 
the Executive Couucil must, at tlie outset, refer in terms of 
undisguised gratification to its vastly improved condition and 
prospects. Xever, during any previous year of the Society, 
have we made such rapid, solid, substantial progress as this 
year. Indeed, in some respects, we have accomplished more 
than in all the previous career of the Society. 

PEOGEESS MADE. 

Our members have largely increased ; our library and cab- 
inet have almost doubled ; our exchange list has been enlarged 
and made to yield us valuable returns ; our finances been 
greatly improved ; our list of correspondents and donors more 
than trebled ; our members greatly increased ; an interest 
and pride awakened in the Society among all classes of our 
citizens ; our cfFectiveness greatly increased by means 
of standing committees, who have been appointed for the 
first time this year; through the repeated publication of our 
proceeding by the press of the state, the name of the Histor- 
ical Society has become familiar to all our citizens, where a 
few months ago it was almost unknown ; while our meetings, 
once slimly attended and frequently without a quorum, are 
now often too large for our limited rooms to accommodate. 

INCEEASE OF THE LIBRARY. 

The rapid increase of the Library has been one of the prin- 



6 



AiTNTJAL REPOKT OF THE 



cipal features of the success alluded to. The additions to 
the library the past year far exceed those of any year 
hitherto. During the 1867 there were added to it as follows : 
Bound volumes, 118 ; unbound volumes and pamphlets, 758 ; 
total, exclusive of duplicates, 876. Making the total num- 
ber of bound and unbound volumes now in the library 
about 3,300. This is in addition to some 85 unbound vol- 
umes of magazines and serials, and 71 unbound volumes of 
state law^s and documents, the latter comprising a complete 
set from the organization of the territory. 

The comparative increase of the library for several years 
past may be gathered from the following statement : 



No. Ee- 

ported in 

1858, - 
1860, 
1864, - 
1866, 
1867, - 
1868, 



Books. 

- 441 
623 

- 826 
958 

-1,037 
1,155 



Pamphlets. 
148 
307 
1,236 
1,286 
1,378 
2,136 



Total in 
Librai-j', 

589 

930 

2,062 

2,244 

2,415 

3,291 



Increase. 
289 

341(2 y's) 
1,132(4 y's) 
182(2 y's) 
171 
876 



CHARACTER OF THE ADDITIONS. 
i 

Of the above works, all were donated, except two vol- 
umes, costing $8.14. The gratifying increase of our libra- 
ry Avas accomplished ^^ithout any special effort. From the 
opening to the close of the year there was a constant stream 
of donations pouring in. 

While every library, formed of donations, fmds a con- 
siderable proportion of its accessions of small value, we 
have been singularly fortunate in avoiding this. With 
scarce an exception, all the accessions have been valuable 
and interesting, and among thcni are several rare works, 
that could not have been purchased at any price, because not 
in market. 

rRlXCITAL DONATIONS. 

From the city of Bergamo, Italy, we have received twen- 
ty-five copies of their work on Bollrami, dedicated to the 



MINNESOTA mSTORICAL SOCIETY. 7 

Society^ including one magnificently bound presentation 
copy, with autographs of the city ofiicers and corporate 
seal, together with a valuable crayon portrait of Beltrami, 
now framed and hanging in our rooms. G. W. Fahnestock 
presents us with several volumes on the North American 
Indians, greatly adding to the value and completeness of our 
already fine collection on that subject ; also, a copy of his 
elegant priv\ately printed genealogy, the "WollT Memorial 
and a scrap book containing one hundred rebel odes, printed 
during the rebellion, and secured by him at various times 
with great trouble and expense, some of them costing one 
dollar each ; besides a valuable collection of pamphlets re- 
lating to American History, numbering 365. Col. Charles 
Whittlesey donates a large paper copy of his History of 
Cleveland. The venerable Major Taliaferro contributes 
thirty-four bound volumes, many of them valuable and rare, 
seventeen pamphlets, and a most valuable collection of MSS. 
on early Minnesota History. From Major General J. Watts 
De Peyster, several rare old volumes and pamphlets. Capt. 
C. K. Davis presents An Impartial History of the Rebel- 
lion and Civil Wars in England, during the reign of Charles 
the First" — a scarce and valuable work. Oscar Stephenson 
donates a collection of the Acts of the General Assembly 
of Virginia in force in 1794." Charles Trowbridge a copy 
of the first edition of that very rare work, Williams' His- 
tory of Vermont." By Col. Wm. Crooks, a copy of Nic- 
ollet's Eeport," also quite scarce, and needed to complete 
our department on early Travels and Explorations in Min- 
nesota. The Cincinnati Historical Society sends us several 
rare volumes on Western History, and the Chicago Histori- 
cat Society has been very liberal in its donations. Robert 
Clarke, of Cincinnati, Dr. John II. Hynson, Dr. A. K. 
Smith, Chauncey K. Williams, E. Slocum, and others, 
have also contributed rare and valuable works. 

Rev. Geo. Gale, F. A. Ilolden, D. W. Hoyt, &c., have 
contributed their genealogies to our collection on that sub- 
ject, and Prof. T. S. Parvin several volumes on Iowa His- 
tory. - 



ANNUAIi REPORT OF THE 



OUR PA^irHLET COLLECTION. 

During the year our pamphlet collection has been largely 
increased, 758 having been donated, exclusive of duplicates, 
by 52 donors, being eight times the number received last 
year. It is astonishing to us how little value is generally 
attached to these modest, unpretending publications. Under 
their ordinary looking covers is often hid the most precious 
historical material. They form, in the estimation of Webster, 
"the elements of history." We urge our members and 
correspondents to increased diligence in rescuing them from 
destruction, and sending them to us. Our collection is 
already becoming valuable, comprising 2,146 pamphlets and 
unbound volumes. There is scarcely one that is not a val- 
uable contribution to history, many of them being rare and 
interesting. The principal donors this year have been 
G. W. Fahnestock, 365, carefully selected, about 100 of 
which are war pamphlets," now so much sought after by 
collectors; J.F.Williams, 102; William F. Phelps, 63, 
on educational and scientific subjects ; C. E. Mayo, 39 ; 
Geo. H. Morgan, St. Louis, 30; Chauncey K. Williams, 
31 ; Chicago Historical Society, 30, &c. 

MAXUSCllEPTS. 

Our collection of manuscripts is also fast increasing. 
During the year we had a most important accession, of 216 
MSS., all donated by Maj. Taliaferro, consisting of copies 
of diaries kept by him at Fort Snelling, 1819 — 1849 ; aulo- 
gi-aph letters of Gen. Taylor, Cass, Nicollet, Gen. Scott, 
Josiah Snelling and others, and numbers of letters contain- 
ing valuable material for the history of those days. 

rOIlTKAITS AND PICTUKES. 

In addition to the splcnded crayon portrait of Beltrami, 
before mentioned, llev. John Ireland has donated a hand- 
somely framed portrait of I\t. Rev. Joseph Cretin, deceased, 
first bisiiop of St. Paul; and by Maj. Taliaferro, of I. X. 



MINTNESOTA HISTORICAL SOCIETY. 



9 



Nicollet, copied from an ivory portrait presented by X. him- 
self to Mrs. Taliaferro. AVe have a number of portraits 
promised, which may soon adorn our walls. There are now 
artists in our State capable of executing the best oil por- 
traits, and we request of our old pioneers that they procure 
theirs and donate to us. 

Prof. Wm. F. Phelps also donates us two interesting 
AYashington souvenirs, — a view of his headquarters at 
Trenton, X. J., 1777, and a facsimile of his celebrated 
letter of thanks to ^' the white robed choir" of young ladies 
who ori'eeted him with soni^s on his entrance to the same 
city in 1789. Both are framed and on our walls. We 
have also been promised by Hon. H. M. Kice, and Bishop 
Whipple, portraits of Indian celebrities of the State. 

THE MUSEU.M AND CABINET. 

Important additions have also been made to the museum 
and cabinet of natural history. Mr. R. O. Sweeney, curator 
of the Natural History department, has steadily pursued his 
-object of making a full set of the birds and reptilia, and, to 
some extent, the mammalia of our state. During the year 
he has prepared and added 14 handsomely stuffed birds to 
our collection, besides other specimens. Dr. Mattocks and 
Dr. H. H. Earaes, each present one. Several of these are 
our largest wild birds, pelicans, eagles, etc. 

The cabinet of minerals and shells has been considerably 
increased by several donors, ])ut owiug to our limited room, 
we have no place to display them. 

Our collection of coins has received 37 additions, some of 
them rare and valuable, while our museum ot curiosities and 
archivology is slowly growing ; the fact that we have utterly 
no room to display articles being a hindrance to its more 
rapid increase 

A full list of donations, which we cannot fmd room to 
enumerate here, will be found in the appendix. Prominent 
among them is a large box of weapons, costumes, and do- 
mestic articles from Polynesia, collected by the Wilkes Ex- 
ploring ]*l\pedition, and donated by the Smithsonian Insti- 
2 



10 ANNUAL REPOET OF THE 

tute ; a fragment of the boiler of the Jolm Kumsey, (that 
exploded Nov. 4, 1801, with such a fearful loss of life), 
thrown 800 yards, donated by Hon. Jolm S. Prince ; two 
remarkably fine pieces of aboriginal pottery, dug up 70 feet 
below the surface of the ground, by A. Van Yorhes, Still- 
water; an impression from the card plate of Gen. Washing- 
ton, used for invitations to his presidential levees, dated 
179-." Col. H. Tindall, of St. Paul, also presents a very 
fine birch bark canoe, made by the Chippewas, a valuable 
specimen, illustrating the life and customs of one of the fast 
disappearing races that once owned our soil. 

NEWSPAPERS. 

Our collection of state newspapers has already become an 
important and valuable feature of our library. During the 
past year a number of Minnesota publishers have been solic- 
ited to contribute their journals for preservation and bind- 
ing, and, in abnost every instance have generously done so. 
We now receive and file, 4 quarterly; 4 monthly magazines ; 
42 weekly papers, and 3 dailies, a list of which is given in 
the appendix. 

We have also been promised, and hope soon to receive, a 
very valuable lot of over 75 volumes of Minnesota papers, 
covering the period of the rebellion and Indian war, a period 
usually prolific of material for the histor}- of our state, and 
during vrhich, owing to the suspension of the Society, cur 
own files were deficient. Added to our collection made pre- 
vious to that interreonum, this donation will irive us full and 
unbroken files of most of the newspapers of the state from 
their establishment down to the present time. 

EXTENT or OUPv PRESENT COLLECTION. 

AVc have on our shelves over seventy-live, and possibl}- one 
hundred volumes, (counting three years of a weekly paper 
one voluiQC,) of our State i)a])ers, whirh should speedily be 
bound for tlieir security against loss and dama.2:e, and for 
facility of reference. Among them are files of St. l*aui 



MFN-XESOTA TITSTOIJTCAT. SOCIETY. 



11 



papers, reaching back to tlie i^suc of the tirst paper in the 
Territory, and almost unbroken to the present time. 

We ought really to characterize these as the most valua- 
ble part of our collections. They contain full and other- 
wise inaccssiblc materials for the historian, biographer and 
statistician, and will soon make our library the resort of 
students of every class. But few, very few persons pre- 
serve newspaper files. Hence, after a few years, a complete 
set becomes very scarce and valuable. A library like our 
own is the proper place to find them, and we beg our mem- 
bers to secure and forward to us any volumes, or even odd 
nunibers, of previous years, they may have, so as to make 
our set as complete as possible. We oxirjht to have in our 
collection, a copy of every paper ever printed in the state ^ 
and perhaps can have if our members exert themselves to 
accomplish it. It should be done noic, as every year adds 
to the difficulty of obtaining the earlier volumes or num- 
bers. 

Steps should be taken by the Society to bind up our 
newspapers at once. It is estimated that $200 or $250 will 
be needed for this purpose. 

MEETINGS. 

During the year J8G7, one annual meeting, twelve 
monthly, one special, (the Carver anniversary,) and one 
field meeting were held. It is worthy ot note that this was 
the first year of our existence during which not a sinirle meet- 
ing of the executive council failed for the want of a quorum, 
and generally the room was crowded. The greatest interest 
has been manifested at these meetings of the Society, and 
the press of the city have given full reports of their j)ro- 
ceedings, tlius keeping our members tliroughout the stale 
constantly informed concerning our progress. 

THE CAliVr.lI CKNTKAAKV. 

On !May 1st, ]8i57, the hundredth anniversary of the 
treaty of Jonathan Carver with the Naudowcssies [Sioux], 



12 



ANNUAL REPOKT OP THE 



held at the great cave/' now within the limits of this city, 
was duly celebrated by the society, and was a most interest- 
ing occasion, being the first centenary of any event connec- 
ted with the history of our state yet celebrated. The mem- 
bers visited the Cave in the afternoon, enjoying the incident 
very highly. In the evening the society assembled at their 
rooms and listened to the reading of an interesting paper on 
the Life and Travels of Jonathan Carver," by Kev. John 
Mattocks. Other very interesting exercises followed, mak- 
ing the occasion a highly profitable one to those present. 
G. W. Fahnestock, Esq., of Philadelphia, an hon(jrary 
member of the Society, whose previous donations had ])een 
most liberal, was present, u^J generously offered to defray 
the expenses of publishing an account of the anniversary 
celebration, which offer was accepted and the pamphlet soon 
after printed and distributed. 

FIELD MEETING. 

On September 25, the Society held a Field Meeting at 
Lake Minnetouka, 30 miles from the city, to explore the 
aboriginal mounds in that vicinity. The excursion was 
numerously attended and greatly enjoyed by the members. 
Two mounds were opened, the • latter yielding by far the 
finest remains yet exhumed in the State, four complete 
skulls being found. It is proposed to continue these Field 
Meetings next season, and explore other tumuli at different 
points, under direction of the Arch;vlogical committee. 
They are conducted without expense to the Society. 

MEMBERS. 

During the year, there were elected thirty active mem- 
bers, seven honorary, and fourteen corresponding. Tlie 
whole number now on our roll is 210. The gentlemen 
elected are all persons taking a deep interest in our Society, 
and many of them, both Ijefore and since tlioir election, 
have made us valuable donations. 

There have been no life members elected for several 



MINNESOTA HISTORICAL SOCIETY. 13 

years. In 185 G, without mu^h ofTort, a number of Life 
Membcrsliips, ($25 each,) were sold, and it is believed that 
the list could be largely increased now by wealthy and 
liberal gentlemen who have since become residents, thus 
securing a fund for the purchase of books, binding, &c., 
or to constitute a permanent endowment, the interest of 
which only should be used for those purposes. 

NECROLOGY OF THE YEAR. 

During the year 1867, only two members of the Society 
died, Hon. Chas. A. Warner, of Chaska, and Socrates 
Nelson, of Stillwater. Mr. Vrariier was a member of the 
Executive Council from 1864 to 1867, and while in the Le2:is- 
lature, took a deep interest in the Society. A biography, 
to be placed among our material for future publication, is 
in preparation. 

Mr, Nelson was one of the oldest members of the Society, 
having joined on its organization, in 1849. An obituary, 
prepared by one of its members, has been published. 

PUBLICATIONS. 

The eighth number of our Annals, (the third of the new 
series,) was issued in February last, and at once distributed 
to members and sister societies. It is a neat pamphlet of 
eighty pages. The first series are now exhausted, and we 
have no copies on hand. 

EXCHANGES. 

From our sister societies we have received munerous 
favors, acknowledged in the list of donors elsewhere. 
During the year, our exchange list has been largely increas- 
ed, and now emln-accs almost every society in the country. 
By direction of the Executive Council, the Secretary trans- 
mitted twent}' numbers of our last annals to the Smithsonian 
Institute for foreign exchanges, from which returns have 
already been received. 



ANNUAL REPORT OF THE 



Nearly every State wliicli ha; a Historical Society grants 
the same quantities of its publications for exchanges. Feel- 
ing the want of material of this kind, application was made 
by the Secretary to the State officers for such documents. 
Adjutant General Van Cleve generously donated fifteen 
copies of his report and Secretary Rogers fifteen copies 
of the Executive DocunicnU. We are also indebted 
to Governor Marshall, Auditor Mcllrath, M. II. Dunncll, 
and others, for similar favors. 

PAPERS READ. 

During the year, five original papers were read by mem- 
bers, as follows : " The Pre-Adamite Man," by Dr. II. II. 
Eames ; Life and Travels of Jonathan Carver," by Kev. 
John Mattocks ; The Ancient Indian ^lounds and Fortifi- 
cations," by Col. ^Ym. H. Nobles ; Biography of Rev. L. 
Gaultier," by Rev. John Ireland ; and Memoir of Lemuel 
Bollcs," by John D. Liidden. Two of these have already- 
been published — the paper on Carver, in our Carver pamphlet, 
and the memoir of Father Gaultier by the Northwestern 

Chronicle. 
\ 

AVORKS ON MINXES OTA. 

Our collection of works on ^linnesota, and of works 
printed in this State, steadily increases. Four bound vol- 
umes and a number of pamphlets, printed within the year, 
were received, as well as a large number issued in prior 
years. AVe now point with pride to over fifty bound vol- 
umes and 200 pamphlets, relating exclusively to our State, 
and we hope ere long to have every book and pamphlet ever 
printed in Minnesota, or elsewhere, relating to it. 'Our suc- 
cess in this direction already is gratifying. We have the 
finest collection of works on our own State within its borders. 
Wheji, last summer, a gentleman from the East inquired at 
the state library for information on Miunesotn, a gilt edged 
copy of Ncill's History," and J^ond's *<^Iinnesota and its 
Resources," (1852), were all that could be found on the sub- 



MCvNESOTA HISTORICAL SOCIETT. 



15 



ject. Ou our shelves, however, the visitor will find copies 
of Hennepin, Carver, (several editions), Lc Hontan, Charle- 
voix, Beltrami, Pike, Long, Perrot, Xicollet, and others — 
works rare and valuable, and scarcely to be had at any price. 

^[AXUSCEIl'T PAPERS OX MIXXESOTA. 

We have also among our MSS., much valuable material 
on Minnesota history, that should ere long be printed, if our 
means permit. Our members and others are continually 
adding to our stock of material, and several have now in 
preparation valuable and important papers, such as sketches 
of the early settlement of towns and counties of the state, 
biographies of the early pioneers, histories of companies or 
regiments engaged in the Indian war or the rebellion, ac- 
counts of Indian massacres and battles, adventures in the 
early settlement of the territory, etc., etc. ; all of which v/ill 
be of inestimable value in a few years, when the events and 
actors of to-day shall all have ^* passed into history." 

ARCHAEOLOGY. 

The committee on Archaeology have had under considera- 
tion the subject of the ancient artificial earthworks — 
* 'mounds'' — of our state, thinking that such remains, from 
their liability to destruction by the progress of settlement, 
required their first and most earnest attention. The means 
of the Society permitting but the most tvifiing expenditures, 
uo surveys have been made, and but little explorations or 
excavations into the mounds have been made. However, in 
order to obtain general information of localities where earth- 
works of the kind exist, and descriptions of their character, 
a circular was printed last August, and widely distributed. 
Though but little has liitherto been done in this field of in- 
quiry, yet it is hoped that within a few 3'ears, if moderate 
means are placed at the disposal of the committee, accurate 
information will have been obtained of the positions and 
character of the remains of the mound-builders of this re- 
gion, and many relics collected of their implements, rude, 



JG 



AN^^UAL REPORT OF THE 



though they are, compared to those of Ohio and the Lower 
Mississippi. 

SCIENTIFIC. 

Some progress has been made by the Society in procuring 
scientific infoimation of value to the state. At the instance 
of a member of tlie Society, one of the engineers of the 
Northern Pacific Kaih'oad, Mr. Anthony Jones, made careful 
astronomical observations for the purpose of ascertaining the 
latitude of St. Panl, and also the variation of the magnetic 
ueedle at that point and St. Clond. The results were as 
follows : I 

Sept. 21, 18G7 — Variation of needle at St. Paul by greatest elongation 
of Polaris— 11 deg. 22 rain. E. 

Sept. 23, 18C7— Latitude of llag-stafl' on Capitol Building, St. PauL by 
meridian altitude of Polaris— 11: deg. 5G min. 13.5 sec. X. 

Oct. 17, 1SG7 — Variation of needle at St. Cloud, by equal altitudes of 
Polaris— 11 deg. 02 min. E. 

It would be very desirable, in addition to the above, to 
have the difference of longitude (time) between this city, at 
least, and ^Milwaukee or Chicago, which could be done by 
means of concerted signals by the electric telegraph, and it 
is to be regretted that the liberal ofler of Col. Graham (now 
deceased,) made over four 3'ears ago, was not accepted by 
the Legislature or City Council, or by the private action of 
prominent citizens themselves. His olfcr was, th;it if the 
mere traveling expenses of himself and two assistants were 
paid, he Avould that winter determine the geographical posi- 
tions of St. Paul, Stillwater, and any other points that might 
be desirable. 

Dr. A. K. Smith, IJ. S. A., of Fort Snelling, lias prepared 
and presented to the Society monthly reports ot the meteor- 
ology of that post, carefully and elaborately drawn up, and 
which will be of great ultimate value. 

I'.ELTKAMI, AND niS NATIVE CITY. 

A pamphlet concerning one of the early explorers of Min- 



Mr^rXESOTA HISTORICAL SOCIETY. 



17 



nesota, Constnutiiie Beltrami, printed at Bergamo, in the 
north of Italy, many years since, accidentally came to the 
notice of Mr. A. J. Hill, of this Society, then in the service, 
and temporarily stationed at Washington. Desirous of 
learning more concerning Beltrami, he addressed a letter to 
the chief ^lagistrate of Bergamo. The letter was handed to 
Signor Gabriel Rosa, the author, editor of the Provincial 
Journal of Brescia, who kindly sent several copies. Some 
further correspondence occurred in reference to the papers 
of Beltrami, which so gratified the city council of Bergamo, 
by showing an interest in their townsman in so far off a land 
as Minnesota, they resolved to collect together such biograpli- 
ical notices and letters as thoy could, and the result of their 
action is shown in the handsome volume dedicated to this 
Society, and the picture before noticed. A letter of thanks, 
written by the President of this Society, elegantly engrossed 
on parchment, was sent to the municipality of Bergamo 
through the Department of State. 



The total receipts of the year from the state, including the 
balance remaining from last year's appropriation, was $781. 
This has been expended as follows : 



OUR FIXAKCES. 



Ecnt, - - - - 

Printing, - - - - 

Salaries, > _ - 

Postage and Express, 
Stationery, - _ - 

Books and ^Magazines, 
Furniture and Shelving, 
Debts incurred in previous years. 
For the Cabinet and Museum, 
Fuel, Lights and Sundries, 
Balance unexpended, - 



- 25 00 
20 00 

- 55 00 



- $150 00 

250 00 

- 100 00 

25 00 

- 10 00 



30 00 
85 00 
50 00 



$781 00 



The small appropriation m:\dc ])v the State, has been c:\vc- 
3 



18 



ANNUAL llEPORT OF THE 



fully husbauded, and we liavc never accomplished so mucli 
on the same sum as this year. 

There is yet due from the state, five years' appropriations, 
from 1859 to 1804, (less $300), which should have been 
made under the act of March 1, 1S5G, appropriating $500 
annually to tlie Society, but which were not made at the 
time, as the State was struggling under financial embarrass- 
ments, and the Society did not press their payment. As 
the State is now able to liquidate this arrearage, which 
amount is legally due the Society, it is to be hoped that the 
whole, or part of the amount, ($2,200), will be cancelled 
this year. Perhaps a better plan would be to receive it in 
installments of $500 annually ; thus, (in addition to our pres- 
ent annual appropriation) securing to us a revenue of $1,000 
annually, which amount would enable us to meet all desired 
expenditures. 

PROPERTY. 

The library and cabinet of the Society, at a fair valuation, 
(based on the present market prices of scarce books, coins, 
etc., ascertained from recent sales of collections) , is worth at 
least $5,000. With trifling exceptions, this collection is all 
the result of donations, showing our facility for collecting a 
valuable library witliout expense to the state, if our incidental 
expenses are only paid. 

OUR ROOMS. 

Allusion has been made to the fact that we long since out- 
grew our present rooms, (in IngersolTs Block), and can use 
them now for little more than mere store rooms lor our col- 
lection. To procure new and larger apartments is an abso- 
lute necessity, and yet the question arises how can we do so? 
To rent rooms such as we ought to have, will cost from $''00 
to $500 annually, thus exhausting our entire appropriation, 
and leaving nothing for other expenses. And again, even 
if we secure hirger and more cheerful rooms, the advantage 
will be but small, unless we adopt some i)lan by which they 



MINNESOTA IlISTOEICAL SOCIETY. 



10 



can be kept open, and our library made accessible to the 
public. 

DUTIES OF SECRETARY AND LIBRARI.VX. 

Indeed, it has also become a necessity that this should be 
done. Hitherto, the duties of Librarian and Secretary 
have been performed gratuitously, or for a nominal com- 
pensation, ])ut the labors of the office have increased so 
rapidly for a year or two past, that no one properly qualified 
can be found, who is able to spare time from his business 
to perform those duties as they should be done. This 
arrangement cannot, thereat re, be longer depended on, 
A change in this matter is demxanded, and its importance is 
too vital to our success to defer the movement much longer. 
We ouglit to have the exclusive services of a competent 
Secretary and Librarian, whose time can be given to iiicreas- 
ing and caring for our collection, and attending to the cor- 
respondence and exchanges of the Society. Under such an 
arrangement, our collection would double in a year, our list 
of correspondents and contributors would greatly increase, 
w^hile, as far as the collection of material illustrative of 
the history of the State — and exhibiting faithfullj^ the an- 
tiquties, and the past, and present resources of Minnesota" 
are concerned, — which duty we are now charged with by 
statute, — we are losing most valuable time for want of some 
one to glean in that field, before the material is lost, and 
the actors v.lio can supply it have passed away. 

A LARGER APrROPRIATIOX NEEDED. 

But it is of course impossible to carry out such a plan 
without increased appropriations from the state. Our revenue 
from mcmber.^hip fees and dues yields us but little, and a 
generation or two may elapse before we have the wealth and 
popuIatit)u in this state to support such a society by mem- 
bership fees alone, or by the revenue from endowments. 
It is to the state, then, that we must look for our principal 
support, iind that support should bo one adequate to our best 



20 



AMiOJAL KEPORT OF Tlffi 



development and success, and worthy of the important 
objects of the society. 

THE SOCIETY A STATE INSTITUTION. 

The Historical Society is not a private corporation, nor a 
local institution. It is a Siati:^ institution — a department of 
State — recognized as such in its constitution and statutes, 
and as much so as its State University, its Agricultural 
College, its Normal Schools, or its eleemosynary institutions, 
all of which it supports liberally from its public funds. 
Membership in the Society is open to any citizen at a nom- 
inal sum. Our members receive no reward or fee for their 
labors. They are given for the benefit of the public — the 
people oi the state. Hence, in asking merely that our 
expenses be paid, we deem that we have a meritorious 
and worthy claim. 

NECESSITY OF A rUBLIC LIBRARY. 

With a s^'stem of public schools last rivaling those of 
eastern states, with an endowment of public land that must 
forever give cheap education to every child in the state, 
with universities and agricultural colleges to complete the 
work begun in the common school, no provision haslet 
been made for a gi-eat public library, under wise manage- 
ment and comprehensive regulations. And yet a public li- 
brary is a part of our system of education. It should con- 
tain works too rare and costly to be found in private libraries, 
and which are needed in the study of such branches of lite- 
rature, or history, or science, as individuals may be engaged 
in. It is not uncommon in the east for persons to make 
long journeys to consult works in libraries, or in pursuit of 
information to be only obtained in such places. And it re- 
mains for our own state to provide liere, where her legislators 
and officers and citizens can have access to it, such a library 
— one which, while furnishing works on almost every topic 
which may be generally found in libraries, shall also especial- 
ly illustrate the civil, military and ecclesiastical history of 



MINNESOTA HISTORTCAI. SOCIETY. 21 

our ovm state — its literature, the record and statistics of its 
growth, its uatural history, the memorials of its aborigines, 
and everything that can illustrate its past or present con- 
dition. 

THE STATE LIBRARY DOES NOT FILL THE WANT. 

True, the State has a library. But its collections have 
been chiefly limited to law books, and to state documents and 
statutes, for the use of the courts and the Legislature. 
These, of course, are valuable and necessary, but are not all 
that is needed. Yet under the present plan of its manage- 
ment, it is not probable that more will be done. It has no 
system for collecting miscellaneous, literary or historical 
works by donation, or by exchange. No effort is made to 
secure or preserve material illustrating the history, arclu\}ol- 
ogy, or condition of our own state, or of securing munuscript 
contributions on the subject. There is but one person, 
really, to care for the library, or feel interested in its suc- 
cess. Even the latter element ma}' be wanting, as fitness or 
experience for the post arc not always considered essential 
in appointments given as political rewards, while in the rota- 
tions that occur, no comprehensive plan for benefitiDg the 
library, extending through a series of years, can be carried 
out. 

WHAT AVE COULD ACCOMPLISH WITH MEANS. 

On the contrary, this Society is organized v,-ith peculiar 
facilities and opportunities for the collection and management 
of such a library as we have suggested. We have an Exec- 
utive Council of 25 members, chosen with peculiar reference 
to their experience and devotion to this subject, acting as 
trustees of its li])rary, and overseeing ils management ; with 
active members throughout the State constantly procuring 
contributions and material lor us, as well as corresponding 
and Honorary -Members, in almost every state and in Europe, 
sending us valuable donations. It is easy to see that we 
need only the means to enable us to amass a Library that 



22 



ANNUAL REPORT OF THE 



will be a pride to the St^to, and of value, directly and 
indirectly, to every citizen.* 

WE SHOULD HAVE ArARTMENTS IN THE CAPITOL. 

Even now our Library can be made of great value to the 
State, if placed in a position where it can be made more 
accessible to the public. Apartments can be prepared for 
cm* use in the Capitol with but little expense, and a slightly 
increased appropriation would also enable us to keep our 
Library constantly open. 

Another plan has been proposed that has also warmly met 
with favor, which is, to constitute the Historical Society 
the trustees, if it might be so termed, of the State Library ; 
to turn over the present collection to their care, under 
proper bonds and restrictions, and thus, by consolidating 
the two libraries, one line collection would be made. The 
sum now spent on both would liberally support it, and 
enable it to increase rapidly l)y tlic purchase of books. 

WHAT HAS BEEN DONE IN WISCONSIN. 

Precedents for such a course as this are not wantiusf. In 
Wisconsin the Historical Society library is kept in the capitol 

♦Whatever is clone, should be doue qidcJ:l>i, if our State ever expects 
to have a Library of value. Books on the early history of the country 
are fast becoming rare and the price greatly enhanced. A private letter 
just received from Judge Goodrich, one of our mem])ers, now Secretary 
of Legation in Brussels, says: If I have a friend in the Legislature. 

(and I t<hould feel sad if I had not.) please say to him. or tliem, that I 
" earnestly hope a ^ijera^ appropriation will be made for the Historical 
" Society. You should have now, an appropriation of .^5,000 to purchase 
*'rarc and old books for your Library — books upon the early history of 
" America. These books can only be luul here, in the oid world, and tliey 
"are here fast disappearing, and their cost is rapidly advancing. A 
<*bookui)on America that could have been purclia-ed for .Slo twenty 
"years ago, can now scarcely be hatl for A copy of /)r /;;•// '{C 

America, would now bring 82,000, and it could -have been had a few 
"■years ago for .s;)00. Agents of Historical Societies of the older States 
"are here, who buy from .$.^0,000 to .$100,000 worth of tliesc books; 
"and it grieves me to see these gems of tlie pa-^t >o rapidl}- falliui; 
"into their liaiids, and we not able to secure a dollar's worth. What 
"we do nuist be done quickly. Books purchased now will double in 
"value in a very few years," &c. 



MINlfESOTA HISTORICAL SOCIETY. 



23 



building — really coiistitutingtho miscellaneous portion of the 
state library, (there being a also a law library), and support- 
ed by the state at an annual expense of about $4,000. This 
liberal policy has enabled that Society to amass a library 
which, commencing in 1854 with 50 volumes, is now a fine 
collection of nearly 30,000 volumes, the third historical 
library in sjze in the United States. The state alone could 
not have done this, for it would have lacked the organiza- 
tion and executive management supplied by the Society ; nor 
could the Society alone have accomplished it, as it would 
have lacked the means. 

CONCLUSION. 

If we cannot place our Society on an enduring basis by 
such a measure as thi.^, enlarging its field and giving it at 
once prosperity and success, wo must secure means by some 
other method, or struggle along in our present cramped man- 
ner, losing golden years, during which so much could be 
done in collecting the materials for the history of our State, 
before it perishes. 

But irrespective of our success in securing this, we urge 
the members to redouble their exertions for the success of 
the Society. There is much to do. A large portion of the 
early history of our State is as yet unrecorded, or exists only 
in rude MSS. scattered about here and there, and liable to 
loss and destruction. The old pioneers, whose memory is 
the sole depository , of thousands of facts and incidents con- 
cerning the early history of Minnesota, are fast passing 
awa}^ and unless their simple story is recorded, it must for- 
ever be lost to us. We urge our members, then, to renewed 
diligence in securing this precious material, and to lose no 
opportunit}' to aid the Society by procuring tor it donations 
of any and all matter that may tend to illustrate the history 
and archivology of our state, and the West generally. 

St. Paul, j7n. 1, 18G8. 



24 

I 



ANNUAL RErOKT OF THE 



DONORS OF BOUND VOLUMES. 



Lawrence Talialerro, Pa., - - - - 34 

City of Bei'iramo, Italv, - - - - 11 

Gen. J. AVatts De Pcyster, X. Y., - - - 6 

F. A. Ilolden, Washington, - - - - 5 

B. W. Lott, St. Paul, - - - - - 5 

T. S. Parvin, Iowa Citv, - - - - 5 

W. H. Seward, Washington, - ' - - - 4 

Chauuey K. AYilliams, Vermont, - - - 4 

Cincinnati Ilist. So., - - - - - 3 

Smithsonian Institute, _ - - - 3 

Hon. Alex. Eamsey, St. Paul, - - - 3 

J. F. Williams, St. Paul, - - - - '3 

J. J. Knox, Washington, - - - - 3 

Chicago Hist. Society, _ - - _ 2 

N. H. Hist. Society,'' - - - - - 2 

CoL Wm. Crooks, St. Paul, - . - 2 

Robert Ciarkc; - - - - - - 2 

D. D. Merrill, St. Paul, - - - . 2 

Dr. A. K. Smith, Fort Snclling, - - - 2 

S. Hopkins Emery, Illinois, _ _ _ 2 



U. S. Naval Observatory, A. Bailey, Dillon O'Brien. 
C. H. Davis, C. K. Davis, John Disturnell, Prof. 
J. W. Foster, Rev. Geo. Gale, .Tohn 11. Hynson, 
Geo. W. Nichols, John S. Prince, E. Slocum, 
Oscar Stephenson, Chas. TroAvbridge, J. F. Tuttle, 
. Chas. Whittlesey and S. P. Jennison, one each, 17 

DONORS OF PAMPHLETS. 



G. W. Fahnestock, Philadelphia, - - - 365 

J. F. A\'iHiams, St. Paul, - - - - 102 

W. F. Phelps, AVinona, - - - - 63 

C. E. Mayo, St. Paul, - - - ' - 39 

Chaujicey K. Williams, Vermont, - - - 31 



]SIIX>rESOTA IIISTOIlTCxVL SOCIETY. 



25 



Geo. II. ^Morgan, St. Louis, . . - 30 

Chicago Hist. Society, - - - - - 29 

Dr. J. C. Rhodes, Stillwater, - - - 17 

Lawrence Taliaferro, Pa., - - - - 17. 

J. B. Chaney, St. Paul, - - - - 15 

City of I^eriiramo, Italy, - - - - 14 

Rhode Islaud Hist. Society, . - - 10 

Rev. J. F. Tuttle, LkL, - - • - - 10 

J. Brooks, Red Wing, - - - - G 

F. A. Holden, Washington, - - - - G 

E. D. Xeili, do - - - - 6 

J. L. Sibley, Cambridge, - - - - 5 

J. Watts De Peyster, X. Y., - - - 4 

Quebec Liter'y and Hist. Seciely, - - ' - 3 

John C.Terry, • - - - - 3 

U. S. Sanitary Commission, - - - - 3 

J. C. Hall, Minneapolis, - - . - 3 

T. S. Parviu, Iowa, - - - ^ - - 3 

American Antiquarian Society, _ _ - 2 

Rev. S. Hopkins Emery, Ills., - - - - 2 

W. B. Griswold, Mankato, _ . - 2 

James Starkey, - - - - - - 2 

Charles Whittlesey, Ohio, - - - - 2 

Mrs. G. H. Woods, Minneapolis, - - - 2 

Unknown, ------ 2 

Long Island Historical Society; ^Mercantile Library 
Association, Boston; X. II. Hist. Society: Ximiis- 
matic and Antiquarian Society, AVisconsin Hist. 
Society, Gen. C. C. Andrews, Robert Clarke, L. 
E. Fisher, Geo. Gray, A. Goodrich, Sherwood 
Hough, D. W. IIoyt,^T. J, King, J. R. Lucas, 
Rev.'^Thos. :MarslialI, Brantz Maver, A. Mitchell, 
T. IL Piesnell, A. J. Reed, Dr.^T. C. Schell, W. 
Hudson Stephens, C. C. Trowbridge, A. B. Wey- 
mouth, Chas. M. Wetherell, one each, - - 24 

DOXORS TO THE MUSEU.AI. 

Pictures. — By the City of Pjcrgamo, Crayon Portrait of 
Beltrami ; by Prot. Wm. F. I'lielps, Winona, two photo- 
graphs of events in the life of Washington; b}^ G. W. 
Fahncstock, 14 photograghic coi)ies of rare 31SS., portraits, 
prints, S:c. ; Maj. Lawrence Taliaferro, two portraits of 
Xicollet. 



CuKiosuiES. — Knot of a tree, shaped like a human face, 
4 



26 



ANNUAL REPOKT OF THE 



prcscDtecl by AVm. Moore, ^linneapolis ; by John S. Prince, 
piece of boiler of John Kumscy, ^vhich exploded Xov. 4, 
1864; by Senator Ramsey, a cane formed of wood from the 
dead line" at Andersonville ; by Maj. Taliaferro, his 
official letter seal, 1819—1849 ; by Gov. S. Miller, ballots 
cast at the first electoral colleire, in Minnesota; by Frank 
Slocum, piece of an oak tr^o, thirty feet from the ground, 
with a deer's horn imljedded in it ; by Chas. E. Mayo, curi- 
ously worm-eaten piece of a ship's keel. 

Arch.t:ology. — By William Armstrong, a flint arrow 
head; by Smithsonian Institute, a box of weapons, cos- 
tumes, &c., from, the Polynesian Islands ; by A. Van Yorhes, 
two pieces of aboriginal potLry. 

Papers, &c,, — By Dr. Schcll, a Japanese paper ; by Mrs. 
Dr. Post, co2:)ies of Englisli papers, 1815 to 1817 ; L. K. 
Fisher, copy of Yokahama (Japan) Times; Bufl*alo Patriot, 
June 18, 1822; James Hughes, Hudson, \Yis., tiles of the 
Minnesota Chronicle, 1849. 

Coins. — By Wm. Armstrong, Y'ashington Co., two silver 
coins, one a shilling of 15G3 ; by Dewitt C. Tousley, thirty- 
one copper coins of various countries. 

ManuscFvIPTs. — By Hon. Frank Steele, deed of Chippewa 
Point, l\Iinn., dated 1831, said to be the oldest deed in ^lin- 
sota ; by Dr. A. K. Smith, Fort Snelling, ^Meteorological 
Eeports, ]May to December ; by Lawrence Taliaferro, 216 
MSS. relating to Minnesota alTairs from 1819 to 1849. 

DONORS TO CABINET OF NATURAL HISTORY. 

Stuffed Birds. — By R. O. Sweeney, Pelicanus Amcr- 
icanus, ]\Iergus ^lorganser Scrrator, Colym))us Glacialis, 
Podiceps Crystatus — also, eight birds names not given; by 
Dr. H. H. Eamcs, Pelicanus Americanus ; by Dr. B. ^lal- 
tocks, fresh water Turtle, prepared. 

Minerals. — By Judge Wm. 'M. McCarthy, fossils in Mag- 
nesian Limestone; Dr. J. C. Ivhodes, Coi)per and other 
minerals fouiul in Stillwater; Rev. John Ireland, specimen 
of Irish Peat, and same from Indiana; by Dr. ^I. L. Pierce, 
Sulphurct of Iron, of the preteroid formation. 



MIXN-ESOTA HISTOKICAL SOCIETY. 



PERIODICALS RECEIVED AXD PRESERVED. 

QUAKTEULY. 

New England Historical and Genealogical 

Register, _ _ - Boston. 

Essex Institute and Hist. Collections, Salem, 
Pleraldic Magazine, - - - Boston. 

Iowa Hist. Society Annals, - - Iowa City. 



MONTHLY. 



Notes and Queries, 
Minnesota Teacher, - 
Historical Magazine, 
Western Book Seller, 
Davis Family Record, 
Farmer's Union, 



London. 
Owatonna. 
New York. 
Chicago. 
Meriden, Conu. 
i\Iinneapolis, 



WEEKLY. 



North 'VYcsterii Chronicle. 
Northfield Recorder, - 
St. Cloud Times, - 
St. Cloud Journal, - 
St. Peter Tribune, 
Mankato Record, 
Shakopee Spectator, 
Rochester Post, 
Brownsville Free Press, - 
Wflbashaw Herald, - 
Dakota County Union, 
Central Republican, - 
Shakopee Argus, - 
St. Charles Herald, - 
Wnseca News, 
]Mower County Register, 
Anoka County Press, 
Stillwater Messenger, 
Sauk Centre Herald, 
Free Homestead, 
Valley Herald, - 
Taylor's Falls Reporter, 
Owatonna Journal, 
Chatlield Democrat, - 
Argus, - - 



St. Paul. 

Northfield. 

St. Cloud. 

St. Cloud. 

St. Peter. 

Mankato. 

Shakopee. 

Rochester. 

Brownsville. 

AVabashaw. 

Hastings. 

Faribault. 

Shakopee. 

St. Charles. 

AVaseca. 

Austin. 

Anoka. 

Stillwater. 

Sauk Centre. 

Winnebago City 

Cha.^^ka. 

Taylor's Falls. 

OAN'atonna. 

Chatlield. 

Red Wing. 



28 



Minnesota South West, 
Mantorviile Express, 
Gazette, - 
Garden City Herald, 
Glencoe liegister, 
Lake City J^eader, 
Hennepin County Dssmocrat, 
Dodge County Kcpublican, 
Le Sueur Democrat, - 
Winona Eepublican, 
Con well's Xorth Star, 
Southern Miunesotian, 
Republican, 

Houston County Journal, 
Brownsville Free Press, 
Goodhue County Republican, 
Freeborn County Standard, - 



Blue ICarth City. 

^Mantorviile. 

Hastini^s. 

Garden City. 

Glencoe. 

Lake City. 

Minneapolis. 

Kasson. 

Le Sueur. 

Winona. 

.Minneapolis. 

Rushford. 

Preston. 

Caledonia. 

Brownsville. 

-Red AVin£i:. 

Albert Lea. 



niOM WISCONSIN. 



Superior Gazette, 
Prescott Journal, 
Polk County Press, 



Superior, Wis. 
Prescott. 
Osceola Mills. 



DALLIES. 



Daily Pioneer, 
Daily Press, - 
Daily Tribune, 



St. Paul. 
St. Paul. 

Minneapolis, 



All the iNIinnesota and Wisconsin publications are do- 
nated to the Society by the publishers. The others arc 
subscribed for. 



( 



DOMATIONS DESIRED -^WV. SOCIETY. 



1. J'oo/j.i of CL'cn/ niad, especially sueli as r«Mule to AiDfiir-an 
llist<iry, ami to the West in inirticular ; Jiioijraphie- ; ►Scientific, CJoo- 
graphical au'l Statistical works, etc. Wo particularly desire works on 
Minnesota Tiavels an<l ]\X].>loratioii.- : City Directories; Ordinanc- 
and Laws of Cities ; Maps ; Co])ies ^^'^ '^a»lier Territorial Laws and 
Session Jf)urQal8 of Minnesota, and those of Wisconsin Territory prior 
to 1849 ; and copicH of cvcrj hook prUifcd In Miiincs<jta , or elsewhere, 

\ written hy rositlents of this State. 

2. Pampfdcis of all tinrjs; Catalogues of Minnesota Colleges and 
other Institutions of Learning; Annual Reports of .Societies ; Sermons 
and Addresses delivered in this State ; Minutes of Church Conventions, 
Synods, or other Ecclesiastical Bodies of Minnesota ; and every otliir 

I Pamplilet relatiiiiz to this Siate, and eu--»'v\ Jierc. 

o. Fllr.-^ of }['> ,1 n'\<ofa Ncicsjjapo'S and ^/r/z/rrrinc-. especially com- 
plete volunii - iif pa-t years, or single numbers even. Publisliers ai -.- 
eai-nestly requested to contribute their publications re.„ailarly, ail ni 
whi(di will bo carefully preserved and bound. 
' 4. ^f'(f: r'':(,l< for Minncs:o^a Jfif^lur,/ : Old T^ettei-s, Journals, and 
I ]Ma!ius('! ipt Xarra lions of the Pioneers of Minnesota ; Original Paper- 
I on the Early MTistory and Settle'^" "?'! nf tin* Territoi-y : Adventures 
! and Conflicts daring the Indian AVar ; l^iographies of the Pioneers of 
j every County, eitlier living or deceased, together with their portraii- 
, an»l aulogr:i]di<. 

.">. C///M)w7;r.«? of all kinds for our Museum ; Coins; Medals; Paint- 
: ings; tiiiiis ; Engravings: Statues; Wai'lvclics; Autograph Letters 
: of di>r!i! . iii-lied persons, etc. 

i;. /',,'■/. lU)isfraflv(> of om- Indian 'J'r\b':t< ; theii* lli-ioiy, Chai"ae- 
teristie-., ileligion, <&:c.; Sketches of their pronuueni Chiefs, Oratois. 
and Warrj(us, together with contributions ol' Indian Weapons, Orna- 
; nients, Curio.-iues and Tni]>lrM-icnts. 

I 7. I ): (ivinr/s, J/fZ/yx. arnd (h.'^rrij)' Ions of ^ln'jir,if S^fnnnd-^ or 
■ i'b/ //>'' ^■ in the Slate ; their size and sliape, and descrii)tiou of any 
j articles found in ihiMU. 

S. jVi.nrrfds, *y/c'7/^, /'o>->.'f'^-, O/v.^^ ./\ 'nff-f ion.-f, and other speci- 
! mens relating t') the Natural History of ^Minnesota. 

i). ■ ]]"(' snUc'd from Jfisforlcal Sociclies and other K-arncd liodics, an 
interrhange vU" books an«l otb' T articles, [)roniising torci>ay suidid"avf>r- 
to th(> full exit Jii of our ability. 

AW' ti u->t il)al cvrry one receiving this circubir v> ill e i vc a gcnerci- 
. ri'sponsc li> the aiiove reiiut'sl-;. Coniniuiiication-^ or donations may 
; be addressed. siTuply:-- 

'• llISTOlilCAIi SOCIETY." St. Pai [ . 

All person.-, who send us donations will be jdaced on ov.v 
exchange li<t, and receive the PuVdicafions of tlio Society in return. 





ANNUAL REPORT 



OV THE 



AlINNESOTA 



HISTORICAL SOCIETY, 



1 1 



I ! 



READ AT THE ANNiiAL MEETING, 



JAX. 20, 18(]8. 



I.UX K TIil XF. BRIS, 



ST. PAUL: 
r u E s s r K J X t i x o. c o m r a n y 



0!) 18G8. % 

^j^gN3. . -e^o 



ANNUAL REPORT 

OF THE 

MINNESOTA 
HISTORICAL SOCIETY, 

READ AT THE ANNUAL MEETING, 

JAN. 20,_18G_8. ^ 



ILiUX E Teiicbris." 



§m,i %h\\\: 

IMIKSS PKINTING COMTAKV. 

18G8. 



0FFICEll'=5 FOR 1868. 



PRESIDENT. 

GOV. WILLIAM K. i\L4KSHALL. 

VICE-PRESIDENTS. 

1. MAJ. GEX. II. H. SIBLEY, 

2. A. II. CATIICAKT, 

3. REV. JOHN IIIELAND. 

SECRETARY. 

J. FLETCHER WILLIAIMS. 

TREASURER. 

PETER BERKEY. 

EXECUTIVE COUNCIL. 



REV. JOHN MATTOCKS, 

CAKT. R. BLAKELEY, 

S.Y. McMASTERS, D. D.,LL.D., 

HON. H. M. ]UCE, 

D. W. INGEKSOLL, 

JUDGE S. J. R. ]\IcMILLAN, 

D. A. ROBERTSON, 

HON. A. GOODRICH, 

HON. JNO. D. LUDDEN, 

DR. C. DeMONTREVILLE, 



CHARLES E. MAYO, 

GEO. A. HAMILTON, 

JAMES P. POND, 

WM. II. KELLEY, 

WM. B. DEAN, 

ROBERT 0. S^VEENEY, 

HENRY H. EA^rES, 

A. J. HILL, 

S. B. WOOLWORTH, 

And the oflicors of the Society. 



TEllMS OF MEMIJEllSIIIP, ETC. 



[Extract from the Constitutiou.] 

The Society shall consist of Active, CoiTCsponding aud 
Honorary Members. Active Members shall consist of per- 
sons residing in the State of ^linnesota. Corresponding 
Members shall consist of persons residing elsewhere, who 
feel an interest in the society and its objects, and are willing 
to aid it by representing it in their vicinity, aud procnriug 
donations for its library and cabinet. Honorary Members 
shall consist of persons distinguished for their literary or 
scientific attainments, particularly in the department of 
American history. 

Each Active Member shall, on admission, pay one dol- 
lar as an initiation fee, and one dolhir per year as annual 
dues. 

Any person, by paying the sum of twenty-five dollars at 
one time, may be elected a Life Member, and shall thereafter 
be free from the payment of annual dues. 



The rooms of the Society are at present in IngcrsoU's 
Block, Third Street, St. Paul. 

The Executive Councilmeets on the second Monday eveniug 
of each month. The meetings arc open and free lor all to 
attend. 



REPORT OF THE EXECUTIVE COUx\CIL. 



Ill presenting the thirteenth annual report of the Society, 
the Executive Council must, at th'^ outset, refer in terms of 
•undisguised gratification to its vastly improved condition and 
prospects. Never, during any previous year of the Society, 
have we made such rapid, solid, substantial progress as this 
year. Indeed, in some respects, we have accomplished more 
than in all the previous career of the Society. 

PROGRESS MADE. 

Our members have largely increased ; our library and cab- 
inet have almost doubled our exchange list has been enlarged 
and made to yield us valuable returns ; our fmanccs been 
greatly improved ; our list of correspondents and donors more 
than trebled ; our members greatly increased ; an interest 
and pride awakened in the Society among all classes of our 
citizens ; our clTcctivcness greatly increased by means 
of standing committees, who have been appointed for the 
first time this year ; through the repeated publication of our 
proceeding by the press of the stale, the name of tlie Histor- 
ical Society has become familiar to all our citizens, where a 
few months ago it was almost imknown ; while our meetings, 
once slimly attended and frequently without a quorum, arc 
now often too large for our limited rooms to accommodate. 

INCREASE OF THE LIIilLiRV. 

The rapid increase of the Library lias been one of the prin- 



\ 



6 



ANISTTJAL REPORT OF THE 



cipal features of the succc.: - r.lliulcd to. The additions to 
the library the past year far exceed those of a D V V e a r 
hitherto. During the 1867 there were added to it as follows : 
Bound volumes, 118 ; unbound volumes and pamphlets, 758 ; 
total, exclusive of duplicates, 876. Making the total num- 
ber of bound and unbound volumes now in the library 
about 3,300. This is in adJiLion to some 85 unbound vol- 
umes of magazines and serials, and 71 unbound volumes of 
state law^s and documents, the latter comprising a complete 
set from the organization of the territory. 

The comparative increase of tlic library for several years 
past may be gathered from the following statement : 



No. Re- 
ported in 

1858, - 

1860, 

1864, - 

1866, 

1867, - 

1868, 



Books, 

- 441 
623 

- '^26 
958 

-1,037 
1,155 



Pamphlets. 

148 

307 
1,236 
1,286 
1,378 
2,136 



Total in 
Library, 

589 
930 
2,062 
2,244 
2,415 
3,291 



Increase. 
289 

341(2 v*s) 
1,132(4 v's) 
182(2 y's) 
171 
876 



CHARACTER OF THE ADDITIONS. 

Of the above works, all were donated, except two vol- 
umes, costing $8.14. The gratifying increase of our libra- 
ry was accomplished without any special ellbrt. From the 
opening to the close of the year there was a constant stream 
of donations pouring in. 

AVhilc every liljrary, formed of donations, fuids a con- 
siderable proportion of its accessions of small value, we 
have been sinirularlv fortunate in avoidim^ this. With 
scarce an exception, all the accessions have been valuable 
and interesting, and among them arc several rare works, 
that could not have been purchased at an} price, because not 
in market. 

PRINCIPAL DONATIONS. 

From the city of Bergamo, Ital}', we have received twen- 
ty-five copies of their work on Beltrami, dedicated to the 



1724222 

MINNESOTA mSTOraCAL SOCIETY. 7 



Society^ including one magnif'^"^ntly bound presentation 
copy, . with autographs of the city ofllcers and corporate 
seal, together with a valuable crayon portrait of Beltrami, 
now framed and hanging in our rooms. G. W. Fahnestock 
presents us with several volumes on the Noilh American 
Indians, greatly adding to the value and completeness of our 
already fuic collection on that ^;u"'ijeot ; also, a copy of his 
elegant privately printed genealogy, the *'Wolii' Memorial ;" 
and a scrap book containing one hundred rebel odes, printed 
during the rebellion, and secured by liim at various times 
with great trouble and expense, some of them costing one 
dollar each ; besides a valuable collection of pamphlets re- 
lating to iVmerican History, nuiu'.^^iing 365. Col. Charles 
Whittlesey donates a large paper copy of his History of 
Cleveland. The venerable Major Taliaferro contributes 
thirty-four bound volumes, many of them valuable and'rare, 
seventeen pamphlets, and a most valuable collection of MSS. 
on early Minnesota History. From Major General J. Watts 
De Peyster, several rare old volumes and pamphlets. Capt. 
C. K. Davis presents " AnLupartial History of the Eebcl- 
lion and Civil Wars in England, during the reign of Charles 
the First" — a scarce and valuable work. Oscar Stephenson 
donates a collection of the Acts of the General Assembly 
of Virginia in force in 1794." Charles Trowbridge a copy 
of the first edition of that very rare work, Williams' His- 
tory of Vermont." By Col. Wm. Crooks, a copy of Nic- 
ollet's Report," also quite scarce, and needed to complete 
our department on early Travels and Explorations in Min- 
nesota. The Cinciu]iati Historical Society sends us several 
rare volumes on AVestern History, and the Chicago Histori- 
cat Society has been very liberal in its donations. Kobert 
Clarke, of Cincinnati, Dr. John H. Hynson, Dr. A. K. 
Smith, Chauncey K. Williams, E. Slocum, and others, 
have also conli-ibutcd rare and valuable works. 

Rev. Geo. Gale, F. A. Holdcn, D. W. Hoyt, c^c, have 
contributed their genealogies to our collection on that sub- 
ject, and Piof. T. S. Parvin several volumes on Iowa His- 
tory. 



8 



ANNUAL REPOET OF TIIE 



OUK rAMPHLET COLLIXTIOX. 

During the year our pamphlet collection has hccn largely 
increased, 758 having been donated, exclusive of duplicate?, 
by 52 donors, being eight times the number received last 
year. It is astonishing to us how little value is generally 
attached to these modest, unpretending pnblications. Under 
their ordinary looking covers is often hid the most precious 
historical material. They form, in the estimation of Webster, 

the elements of history." We urge our members and 
correspondents to increased diligence in rescuing them from 
destruction, and sending them to us. Our collection is 
already becoming valuable, comprising 2,146 jDamphlets and 
unbound volumes. There is scarcely one that is not a val- 
uable contribution to history, many of them being rare and 
interesting. The principal donors this year have been 
G. W. Fahnestock, 305, carefully selected, about 100 of 
which are war pamphlets," now so much sought after by 
collectors; J. F. Williams, 102; William F. Phelps, 03, 
on educational and scientific subjects ; C. E. Mayo, 39 ; 
Geo. H. Morgan, St. Louis, 30; Chauucey K. Williams, 
31 ; Chicago Historical Society, 30, &c. 

MAXUSCKIPTS. 

Our collection of manuscripts is also fast increasing. 
During the year we had a most important accession, of 210 
MSS., all donated by Maj. Taliaferro, consisting of copies 
of diaries kept by him at Fort Snelling, 1819 — 1849 ; auto- 
gi-apli letters of Gen. Taylor, Cass, Nicollet, Gen. Scott, 
Josiah Snelling and others, and numbers of letters contain- 
ing valuable material for the history of those days. 

PORTRAITS AND nCTURKS, 

In addition to the splended crayon portrait of Beltrami, 
before mentioned, llev. John Ireland has donated a liaiul- 
somely framed portrait of lU. Rev. Josc})!! Cretin, deceased, 
first bishop of St. Paul; and by Maj. Taliaferro, of I. X. 



MIXlsTESOTA HISTOKICAI^ SOCIETY. 



9 



Nicollet, copied from an ivoiy portrait prcseated by N. him- 
self to Mrs. Taliaferro. We have a number of portraits 
promised, which may soon adorn our walls. There are now 
artists in our State capable of executing the best oil por- 
traits, and we request of our old pioneers that they procure 
theirs and donate to us. 

Prof. Wm. F. Phelps also donates us two interesting 
Washington souvenirs, — a view of his headquarters at 
Trenton, N. J., 1777, and a facsimile of his celebrated 
letter of thanks to the white robed choir" of young ladies 
who <Treeted him with soni^s on his entrance to the same 
city in 1789. Both are framed and on our walls. AVe 
have also been promised by Il^n. H. M. Ilice, and Bishop 
Whipple, portraits of Indian celebrities of the State. 

THE MUSEUM AND CABINET. 

Important additions have also been made to the museum 
and cabinet of natural history. Mr. R. O. Sweeney, curator 
of the Natural History department, has steadily pursued his 
object of making a fall set of the birds and rcptilia, and, to 
some extent, the mammalia of our state. During the year 
be has prepared and added 14 handsomely staffed birds to 
our collection, besides other specimens. Dr. Mattocks and 
Dr. II. H. Eames, each present one. Several of these are 
our largest wild birds, pelicans, eagles, etc. 

The cabinet of minerals and shells has been considerably 
incrcascd by several donors, but owing to our limited room, 
we have no place to display them. 

Our collection of coins has received 37 additions, some of 
them rare and valuable, while our museum ot curiosities and 
archa^oloirv is slowlv aTowinir ; the fact that we have utterlv 
no room to display articles being a jiindrance to its more 
rapid increase 

A full list of donations, which we cannot find room to 
enumerate here, will be found in the appendix. Prominent 
among them is a large box of weapons, costumes, and do- 
mestic articles from Polynesia, collected by the Wilkes Ex- 
ploring Expedition, and donated by the Smithsonian Insti- 
2 



10 



AKNUAL REPORT OF THE 



tute ; a fragment of the boiler of the John Rumsey, (that 
exploded Nov. 4, 18G4, with such a fearful loss of life), 
thrown 800 yards, donated by lion. John S. Prince ; two 
remarkably fine pieces of aboriginal pottery, dug up 70 feet 
below the surfiice of the ground, by A. Van Vorhes, Still- 
water; an impression from the card plate of Gen. Washing- 
ton, used for invitations to his presidential lev^ees, dated 
179-." Col. H. Tiudall, of St. Paul, also presents a very 
fine birch barlv canoe, made by the Chippcwas, a valuable 
specimen, illustrating the life and customs of one of the fast 
disappearing races that ouce owned our soil. 

Our collection of state newspapers has already become an 
important and valuable feature of our library. During the 
past year a number of Minnesota publishers have been solic- 
ited to contribute their journals for preservation and bind- 
ing, and, in almost every instance have generously done so. 
We now receive and file, 4 quarterly ; 4 monthly magazines ; 
42 weekly papers, and 3 dailies, a list of which is given in 
the appendix. 

We have also been promised, and hope soon to receive, a 
very valuable lot of over 75 volumes of ^Minnesota papers, 
covering the period of the rebellion and Indian war, a period 
usually prolific of material for the history of our state, and 
during which, owing to the suspension of the Society, our 
own files were deficient. Added to our collection made pre- 
vious to that interregnum, this donation will give us full and 
unbroken files of most of the newspapers of the state from 
their establishment down to the present time. 

EXTENT OF OUK PRESENT COLLECTION. 

We have on our shelves over sevenly-fivc, and possibly one 
hundred volumes, (counting three years of a weekly paper 
one volume,) of our State papers, which should speedily be 
bound for their security against loss and dama^ro, and for 
facility of reference. Among them are files of St. Paui 



MmXESOTA HISTOItlCAL SOCIETY. 



11 



papers, renchiiig back to the i.'^suc of the first paper in the 
Territory, and almost unbroken to the present time. 

Wc oiiiiht really to characterize these as the most valua- 
ble part of our collections. They contain full and other- 
wise inacessible materials for the historian, biographer a'-id 
statistician, and will soon make our library the resort of 
students of every class. But few, veiy few persons pre- 
serve newspaper files. Hence, after a few years, a comple te 
set becomes very scarce and valuable. A library like our 
own is the proper place to find them, and we beg our mein- 
bers to secure and forward to us any volumes, or even odd 
numbers, of previous years, they may have, so as to make 
our set as complete as possible. We ought to have in our 
collection^ cf> copy of every paper ever printed in the sta^.e. 
and perhaps can have if our members exert themselves to 
accomplish it. It should be done now, as every year adds 
to the difficulty of obtaining the earlier volumes or num- 
bers. 

Steps should be taken by the Society to bind up our 
newspapers at once. It is estimated that $200 or $250 will 
l)e needed for this purpose. 

MEETINGS. 

During the year 1867, one annual meeting, tAvelve 
monthly, one special, (the Carver anniversary,) and one 
field meeting were held. It is worthy ot note that this w:\s 
the first year of our existence during Avliich not a single meet- 
ing of the executive council failed for the want of a quorum, 
and generally the room was crowded. The greatest interest 
has been manifested at these meetings of the Society, and 
the press of the city have given full reports of their pro- 
ceedings, thus keeping our members throughout the stare 
constantly informed concerning our progress. 

THE CAllVEK CENTENARY. 

On May 1st, 1807, the hundredth anniversary of the 
treaty of Jonathan Carver with the Xaudowessies [Sioux~, 



12 



AKXUAI. EEPORT OF THE 



held at the great cave." now within the limits of this city, 
was duly celebrated by the society, and was a most interest- 
ing occasion, being the first centenary of any event connec- 
ted with the history of our state yet celebrated. The mem- 
bers visited the Cave in the afternoon, enjoying the incident 
very highly. In the evening the society assembled at their 
rooms and listened to the reading of an interesting paper on 
the Life and Travels of Jonathan Carver,'' by Eev. John 
Mattocks. Other very interesting exercises followed, mak- 
ing the occasion a highly profitable one to those present. 
G. ^Y. Fahnestock, Esq., of Philadelphia, an honorary 
member of the Society, whose previous donations had been 
most liberal, was present, and generously offered to defray 
the expenses of publishing an account of the anniversary 
celebration, which offer was accepted and the pamphlet soon 
after printed and distributed. 

FIELD MEETING. , 

On September 25, the Society held a Field Meeting at 
Lake Minnetonka, 30 miles from the city, to explore the 
aboriginal mounds in that vicinity. The excursion was 
numerously attended and greatly enjoyed by the members. 
Two mounds were opened, the latter yielding by far the 
finest remains yet exhumed in the State, four complete 
skulls being found. It is proposed to continue these Field 
Meetings next season, and explore other tumuli at different 
points, under direction of the iVrchcelogical committee. 
They are conducted without expense to the Society. 

MEMBERS. 

During the year, there were elected thirty active mem- 
bers, seven honorary, and fourteen corresponding. The 
whole number now on our roll is 210. The gentlemen 
elected are all persons taking a deep interest in our Society, 
and many of them, both before and since their election, 
have made us valuable donations. 

There have been no life members elected for several 



MINNESOTA HTSTORICAL SOCIETY. 



13 



years. lu 1856, without much cfTort, a number of Life 
Memberships, ($25 each,) were sold, and it is believed that 
the list could be largely increased uow by wealthy and 
liberal gentlemen who have since become residents, thus 
securing a fund for the purchase of books, binding, &c., 
or to constitute a permanent endowment, the interest of 
which only should be used for those purposes. 

NECROLOGY OF THE YEAK. 

During the year 1867, only two members of the Society 
died, Hon. Chas. A. Warner, of Chaska, and Socrates 
Nelson, of Stillwater. Mr. ^."'•^nruer was a member of the 
Executive Council from 1864 to 1867, and while in the Legis- 
lature, took a deep interest in the Society. A biography, 
to be placed among our material for future publication, is 
in preparation. 

Mr. Nelson was one of the oldest memi)ers of the Society, 
having joined on its organization, in 1849. An obituary, 
prepared by one of its members, has been published. 

PUBLICATIONS. 

The eighth number of our Annals, (the third of the new 
series,) was issued in February last, and at once distributed 
to members and sister societies. It is a neat pamphlet of 
eighty pages. The first series arc now exhausted, and we 
have no copies on hand. 

EXCHANGES. 

From our sister societies we have received numerous 
favors, acknowledged in the list of donors elsewhere. 
During the year, our exchange list has been largely increas- 
ed, and now embraces almost every society in the country. 
By direction of the Executive Council, the Secretary trans- 
mitted twenty numbers of our last annals to the Smithsonian 
Institute for foreign exchanges, from which returns have 
already been received. 



ANmJAL REPORT OP TflE 



Nearly every State whiob lias a Historical Society grants 
the same quantities of its publications for exchanges. Feel- 
ing the want of material of this kind, application was made 
by the Secretary to the State officers for such documents. 
Adjutant General Yan Clcve generously donated iii'ieen 
coi^ies of his report and Secretary Rogers fifteen copies 
of the Executive Document^. We are also indebted 
to Governor Marshall, Auditor Mcllrath, M. II. Dunnell, 
and others, for similar favors. ^ 

PAPERS READ. 

During the year, five ori:^'I:.cil papers were read by mem- 
bers, as follows : The Pre-xVdamite Man," by Dr. H. II. 
Eames ; Life and Travels of Jonathan Carver," by Eev. 
John Mattocks ; The Ancient Indian ]Mounds and Fortifi- 
cations," by Col. Wm. H. Nobles ; " Biography of Eev. L. 
Gaultier," by liev. Johu Ireland : and " Memoir of Lemuel 
Bolles," by John D. Ludden. Two of these have already 
been published — the paper on Carver, in our Carver pamphlet, 
and the memoir of Father Gaultier by the Northwestern 
Chronicle. 

WORKS ON MINNESOTA. 

Our collection of works on Minnesota, and of works 
printed in this State, steadily increases. Four bound vol- 
umes and a number of pamphlets, printed within the year, 
were received, as well as a large number issued in prior 
years. We now point with pride to over fifty bound vol- 
umes and 200 pamphlets, relating exclusively to our State, 
and we hope ere long to have every book and })amplilct ever 
printed in ^Minnesota, or elsewhere, relating to it. Our suc- 
cess in this direction already is gratifying. We have the 
finest collection of works on our own State within its borders. 
When, last summer, a gentleman from the Fast inquired at 
the state library for information on Minnesota, a gilt edged 
copy of Xeill's History," and Bond's ^linnesota and its 
Resources," (1852), were all that could be found on the sub- 



MIiranESOTA IIISTOEICAL SOCIETY. 



15 



ject. On our shelves, however, the visitor will find copies 
of Hennepin, Carver, (several editions), Le Ilontan, Charle- 
voix, Beltrami, Pike, Long, Perrot, Nicollet, and others — 
works rare and valuable, and scarcely to be had at any price. 

^ MANUSCEIPT TAPEES ON MINNESOTA. 

We have also among our MSS., much valuable material 
on Minnesota history, that should ere long be printed, if our 
means permit. Our members and others are continually 
adding to our stock of material, and several have now in 
preparation valuable and important papers, such as sketches 
of the early settlement of tor'. s and counties of the state, 
biographies of the early pioneers, histories of companies or 
regiments engaged in the Indian war or the rebellion, ac- 
counts of Indian massacres and battles, adventures in the 
early settlement of the territory, etc., etc. ; all of which will 
be of inestimable value in a few years, when the events and 
actors of to-day shall all have passed into history." 

. ' ARCHiEOLOGY. 

The committee on Archaeology have had under considera- 
tion the subject of the ancient artificial earthworks — 
*'mounds" — of our state, thinking that such remains, from 
their liability to destruction by the progress of settlement, 
required their first and most earnest attention. The means 
of the Society permitting but the most trilling expenditures, 
no surveys have been made, and but little explorations or 
excavations into the mounds have been made. However, in 
order to obtain general information of localities where earth- 
works of the kind exist, and descriptions of their character, 
a circular was printed last August, and widely distributed. 
Though but little has liitlicrto been done in this field of in- 
quiry, yet it is hoped that within a few years, if moderate 
means are placed at tlie disposal of the committee, accurate 
information will have been obtained of the positions and 
character of the remains of the mound-builders of this re- 
gion, and many relics collected of their implements, rude. 



ANISrUAL IlEPOKT OF THE 



though they are, compared to those of Ohio and the Lower 
Mississippi. 

SCIENTIFIC. 

Some progress has been made by the Society in procuring 
scientific information of value to the state. At the instance 
of a member of the Society, oue of the engineers of the 
Northern Pacific Eaikoad, Mr. Anthony Jones, made careful 
astronomical observations for the purpose of ascertaining the 
latitude of St. Paul, and also the variation of the magnetic 
needle at that point and St. Cloud. The results were as 
follows : 

Sept. 21, 1SG7 — Variatiou of needle at St. Paul by greatest elongation 
of Polaris — 11 cleg. 22 min. E. 

Sept. 23, 18G7— Latitude of flag-siaff on Capitol Building, St. Paul, by 
meridian altitude of Polaris— ll deg. 5G min. 13.5 sec. X. 

Oct. 17, 18G7— Variation of needle at St. Cloud, by equal altitudes of 
Polaris — 11 deg. 02 inin. E. ■ 

It would be very desirable, in addition to the above, to 
have the difference of longitude (time) between this city, at 
least, and Milwaukee or Chicago, which could be done by 
means of concerted signals by the electric tclegrapli, and it 
is to be regretted that the liberal ofi'er of Col. Graham (now 
deceased,) made over four years ago, was not accepted by 
the Legislature or City Council, or by the private action of 
prominent citizens themselves. His offer was, that if the 
mere traveling expenses of himself and two assistants were 
paid, he would that winter determine the geographical posi- 
tions of St. Paul, Stillwater, and any other points that might 
be desirable. 

Dr. A. K. Smith, U. S. A., of Fort Snelling, has prepared 
and presented to the vSociety monthly reports of tlie meteor- 
ology of that post, carefully and elaborately drawn up, and 
which will be of great ultimate value. 

IJELTKAMI, AND HIS NATIVE CITY. 

A pamphlet concerning one of the early explorers of Min- 



MTK^^'ESOTA HISTORICAL SOCIETY. 



17 



ncsota, Constautine Beltrami, printed at Bergamo, in the 
north of Italy, many years since, accidentally came to the 
notice of Mr, A. J. Hill, of this Society, then in the service, 
and temporarily stationed at Washington. Desirous of 
learning more concerning Beltrami, he addressed a letter to 
the chief ^Magistrate of Bergamo. The letter was handed to 
Siguor Gahriel Rosa, the author, editor of the Provincial 
Journal of Brescia, who kindly sent several copies. Soino 
further correspondence occurred in reference to the papers 
of Beltrami, which so gratified the city council of Bergamo, 
by showing an interest in their townsman in so far off a land 
as Minnesola, they resolved to collect together such biograph- 
ical notices and letters as they eould, and the result of their 
action is shown in the handsome volume dedicated to this 
Society, and the picture before noticed. A letter of thanks, 
written by the President of this Society, elegantly engrossed 
on parchment, was sent to the municipality of Bergamo 
through the Department of State. 

OUR FIXAKCES. 

The total receipts of the year from the state, including the 
balance remaining from last year's appropriation, was $781. 
This has been expended as follows : 



Rent, ----- 


- $150 00 


Printing, - - - - 


250 00 


Salaries, - - - - 


- 100 00 


Postage and Express, 


25 00 


Stationery, _ - - - 


- 10 00 


Books and ^Magazines, 


30 00 


Furniture and Shelving, 


- 85 00 


Debts incurred in previous years, 


50 00 


For the Cabinet andiNIuscum, 


- 25 00 


Fuel, Lights and Sundries, 


20 00 


Balance unexpended, - 


- 55 00 




$781 00 



The small appropriation made l)y the Stale, has been caro- 
3 



18 



ANNUAL llEPORT OF THE 



fully Lusbanded, and we have never accomplished so much 
on the same sum as this year. 

There is yet due from the state, five years' appropriations, 
•from 1859 to 1864, (less $300), which should have been 
made under the act of Marcli 1, 185G, appropriating $500 
annually to the Society, but which were not made at tlie 
time, as the State was stru^rcrliii j: under financial embarrass- 
ments, and the Society did not press their payment. As 
the State is now able to liquidate this arrearage, which 
amount is legally due the Society, it is to be hoped that the 
whole, or part of the amount, ($2,200), will be cancelled 
this 3'ear. Perhaps a better plan would be to receive it in 
installments of $500 annually ; thus, (in addition to our pres- 
ent annual appropriation) securing to us a revenue of $1,000 
annually, which amount would enable us to meet all desired 
expenditures. 

PROrERTY. 

The library and cabinet of the Society, at a fair valuation, 
(based on the present market prices of scarce books, coins, 
etc., ascertained from recent sales of collections) , is worth at 
least $5,000. With trilling exceptions, this collection is all 
the result of donations,' showing our facility for collecting a 
valuable library without expense to the state, if our incidental 
expenses are only paid. 

OUR ROOMS. 

Allusion has been made to the fiict that wc long since out- 
grew our present rooms, (in Ingersoll's Block), and can use 
them now for little more than mere store rooms for our col- 
lection. Tj procure new and larger apartments is an abso- 
lute necessity, and yet the question arises ho\v can wc do so? 
To rent rooms such as we ought to have, will cost from $."500 
to $500 annually, thus exhausting our entire appropriation, 
and leaving nothing for other expenses. And again, even 
if we secure larger and more cheerful rooms, the advantage 
will be but small, unless we adopt some plan b}^ which they 



MINNESOTA IIISTOEICAL SOCIETY. 19 

can be kept open, and our library made accessible to the 
public. 

DUTIES OF SECRETARY AND LIBRARIAN. 

I 

Indeed, it has also become a necessity that this should be 
done. Hitherto, the duties of Librarian and Secretary 
have been performed gratuitously, or for a nominal com- 
pensation, but the labors of the office have increased so 
rapidly for a year or two past, that no one properly qualified 
can be found, who is able to spare time from his business 
to perform those duties as they should be done. This 
arrangement cannot, therefuic, be longer depended on. 
A change in this matter is demanded, and its importance is 
too vital to our success to defer the movement much lono'er. 
We ought to have the exclusive services of a competent 
Secretary and Librarian, whose time can be given to increas- 

ins" and cariu<r for our collection, and attendino; to the cor- 
es o ' o 

respondence and exchanges of the Society. Under such an 
arrangement, our collection would double in a year, our list 
of correspondents and contributors would greatly increase, 
while, as far as Ihe collection of material illustrative of 
the history of the State — and exhibiting fliithfullj^ the an- 
tiquties, and the past, and present resources of Minnesota" 
are concerned, — which duty we are now charged with by 
statute, — we are losing most valuable time for want of some 
one to glean in that field, before the material is lost, and 
the actors who can supply it have passed away. 

A LARGER APPROPRIATION NEEDED. 

But it is of course impossible to carry out such a plan 
without iiicreasedappropriations from the state. Our revenue 
from membership fees and dues yields us but little, and a 
generation or two may elapse before we have the wealth and 
population in this state to support such a society by mem- 
bership fees alone, or by the revenue from endowments. 
It is to the state, then, that we must look ibr our principal 
support, and that support should be one adequate to our best 



20 



ANJSrUAL REPORT OF THE 



development aud success, and worthy of the important 
objects of the society. 

; THE SOCIETY A STATE INSTITUTION. 

The Historical Society is not a private corporation, nor a 
local institution. It is a State institution — a department of 
State — recognized as such in its constitution and statutes, 
and as much so as its State University, its Agricultural 
College, its Xormal Schools, or its eleemosynary institutions, 
all of which it supports liberally from its public funds. 
Membership in the Society is open to any citizen at a nom- 
! inal sum. Our members rccc'vo no reward or fee for their 

I , labors. They are given for the benefit of the public — the 
' people ol the state. Hence, in asking merely that our 

expenses be paid, we deem that wx have a meritorious 
and worthy claim. 

NECESSITY OF A PUBLIC LlBKAllY. 

AYith a system of public schools fast rivaling those of 
eastern states, with an endowment of public land that must 
forever give cheap education to every child in the state, 
with universities and agricultural colleges to complete the 
work begun in the common school, no provision has 3 et 
been made for a great public library, under wise manage- 
ment and comprehensive regulations. And yet a public li- 
brary is a part of our system of education. It should con- 
tain works too rare and costly to be found in private libraries, 
and ^\'hich are needed in the study of such brandies of lite- 
rature, or history, or science, as individuals may be engaged 
in. It is not uncommon in the east for persons to make 
long journeys to consult works in libraries, or in pursuit of 
information to be only obtained in such places. And it re- 
mains for our own state to provide here, where licr legislators 
and oflicers and citizens can have access to it, such a library 
— one which, while furrnshing vrorks on almost every topic 
which may be generally found in libraries, shall also especial- 
ly illustrate the civil, military and ecclesiastical history of 



MINNESOTA IIISTORICAI. SOCIETY. 21 



our own state — its literaturc, the record and statistics of its 
gi-owth, its natural history, the memorials of its aborigines, 
and everything that can illustrate its past or present con- 
dition. 

THE STATE LIBRARY DOES NOT FILL THE WANT. 

True, the State has a library. But its collections liave 
been chictly limited to law books, and to state documents and 
statutes, for the use of the courts and the Legislature. 
These, of course, are valuable and necessary, but are not all 
that is needed. Yet under the present plan of its manage- 
ment, it is not probable that .uiore will be done. It has no 
system for collecting miscellaneous, literary or historical 
works by donation, or by exchange. No effort is made to 
secure or preserve material illustrating the history, archaeol- 
ogy, or condition of our own state, or of securing manuscript 
contributions on the subject. There is but one person, 
really, to care for the Hilary, or feel interested in its suc- 
cess. Even the latter element may be wanting, as fitness or 
experience for the post are not always considered essential 
in appointments given as political rewards, while in the rota- 
tions that occur, no comprehensive plan for benefiting the 
library, extending through a series of years, can be carried 

out. i 

WlfAT WE COULD ACCOZ^IFLISII WITH MEANS. 

On the contrary, this Society is organized with peculiar 
facilities and opportunities for the collection and management 
of such a library as we have suggested. We have an Exec- 
utive Council of 25 members, chosen with i)cculiar reference 
to their experience and devotion to this sul)ject, acting as 
trustees of its library, and overseeing its management ; with 
active members throughout the State constantly procuring 
contributions and material for us, as well as corresponding 
and Honorary IMembers, in almost every state and in Europe, 
sending us valuable donations. It is easy to see that we 
need only the means to enable us to amass a Librarj' that 



22 



AIsTNUAL KEPORT OF THE 



will be a pride to the State, and of value, directly and 
indirectly, to every citizen.* 

VfE SHOULD HAVE APARTMENTS IN THE CAPITOL. 

Even now our Library can be made of great value to the 
State, if placed in a position where it can be made more 
accessible to the public. Apartments can be prepared for 
our use in the Capitol with but little expense, and a slightly 
increased appropriation would also enable us to keep our 
Library constantly open. 

Another plan has been proposed that has also warmly met 
with favor, which is, to constitute the Historical Society 
the trustees, if it might be bu termed, of the State Library ; 
to turn over the present collection to their care, under 
proper bonds and restrictions, and thus, by consolidating 
the two libraries, one fine collection would be made. The 
sum now spent on both would liberally support it, and 
enable it to increase rapidly by the purchase of books. 

WHAT HAS BEEN DONE IN WISCONSIN. 

Precedents for such a course as this are not wantinir. In 
Wisconsin the Historical Society library is kept in the capitol 



* Whatever is clone, should be done quickly, if our State ever expects 
to have a Library of value. Books on the earl}^ history of the countiy 
are fast becoming rare and the price greatly euluinced. A private letter 
just received from Judge Goodrich, one of our members, now Secretary 
of Legation in P>russels, says: "If I have a friend in the Legislature, 

(and I should feel sad if I had not.) please say to him, or them, that I 
" earnestly ho])c a ^i jera? appropriation will be made for the Historical 
" Society. You should have now, an appropriation of .$5,000 to purchase 
"rare and old books for your Library — books upon the early history of 
"America. These books can only be had here, iu tlie old Avorkh and they 
"are here fiist disappearing, and their cost is rapidly advancing. A 
"book upon America that could have been purcliascd for .$15 twenty 
"years ago, can now scarcely be had for $100. A co^y DcJiri/ s 

America, would now bring $2,000, and it could have been had a few 
"years ago for $300. Agents of Historical Societies of the older States 
"arc licre, who buy from $50,000 to $100,000 worth of these books; 
"and it grieves me to see these gems of the past so rapidly falling 
" into their hands, and we not able to secure a dollar's worth. What 
"we do must be done quickly. Books purcliased now will double in 
"value in a very few years," &c. 



MINNESOTA HISTORICAL SOCIETY. 23 



building — really constitutiagthc miscellaneous portion of the 
state library, (there being a also a law library), and support- 
ed by the state at an annual expense of about $4,000. This 
liberal policy has enabled that Society to amass a library 
which, commencing in 1854 with 50 volumes, is now a fme 
collection of nearly 30,000 volumes, the third historical 
library in size in the United States. The state alone could 
not have done this, for it would have lacked the organiza- 
tion and executive management supplied by the Society ; nor 
could the Society alone have accomplished it, as it would 
have lacked tlie means. 

CONCLUSION. 

If we cannot place our Society on an enduring basis by 
such a measure as this, enlarging its field and giving it at 
once prosperity and success, we must secure means by some 
other method, or struggle along in our present cramped man- 
ner, losing golden years, during which so much could be 
done in collecting the materials for the history of our State, 
before it perishes. 

But irrespective of our success in securing this, we urge 
the members to redouble their exertions for the success of 
the Society. There is much to do. A large portion of the 
early historj^ of our State is as yet unrecorded, or exists only 
in rude MSS. scattered about here and there, and liable to 
loss and destruction. The old pioneers, whose memory is 
the sole depository of thousands of facts and incidents con- 
cerning the early history of Minnesota, are fast passing 
awa}', and unless their simple story is recorded,' it must for- 
ever be lost to us. We urge our members, then, to renewed 
diligence in securing this precious material, and to lose no 
opportunity to aid the Society by procuring tor it donations 
of any and all matter that may tend to illustrate the history 
and archivology of our state, and the West generally. 

St. Paul, Jan. 1, 18G8. 



24 



ANmrAL KEPORT OF TUE 



DONOES OF BOUND VOLUMES. 



Lawrence Taliaferro, Pa., - - - - 34 

City of Bergamo, Italy, - - - - 11 

Gen. J. Watts De Peyster, X. Y., - - - 6 

F. A. Holden, Washington, - - - 5 

B. W. Lott, St. Paul, - - - - - 5 

T. S. Parvin, Iowa City, - - - - 5 

W. H. Seward, Washington, - - - - 4 

Chauncy K. Williams, Vermont, - - _ 4 

Cincinnati Hist. So., - - - - - 3 

Smithsonian Institute, ^ - - _ 3 

Hon. Alex. Pamsey, St. Paul, - - - 3 

J. F. Williams, St. Paul, - - ^ ^ 3 

J. J. Knox, Washington, - - - - 3 

Chicago Hist. Society, - - - - 2 

N. H. Hist. Society ,^ - - - - - 2 

CoL Wm. Crooks, St. Paul, - . - 2 

Robert Clarke, - - - - - - 2 

D. D. Merrill, St. Paul, - - - - 2 

Dr. A. K. Smith, Fort Suelling, - - - 2 

• S. Hojikins Emery, Illinois, - - - 2 



U. S. Naval Observatory, A. Bailey, Dillon O'Brien, 
C. 11. Davis, C. K. Davis, John Disturnell, Prof. 
J. W. Foster, l^cv. Geo. Gale, John H. Hynsou, 
Geo. W. Nichols, John S. Prince, E. Slocum, 
Oscar Stephenson, Chas. Trowbridge, J. F. Tuttle, 
• Chas. Whittlesey and S. P. Jennison, one each, 17 

DONORS OF PAMPIH.ETS. 



G. AV. Fahnestock, Philadelphia, - - - 3G5 

J. F. AVilliams, St. Paul, ... - 102 

W. F. Phelps, Winona, - - - - 63 

C. E. Mayo, St. Paul, - - - ' , 

Cliauncey K. AVilliams, Vermont, - - - 31 



MINifESOTA HISTORICAL SOCIETY. 



25 



J. B. Chancy, St. Paul, 
City of Bergamo, Italy, 
Khode Island Hist. Society, 



Geo. H. Morgan, St. Louis, 
Chicago Hist. Society, - 
Dr. J. C. lihodes, Stillwater, 
Lawrence Taliaferro, Pa., 



- 17 

15 

- U 

10 

- 10 



30 
29 
17 



Rev. J. F. Tattle, Ind., 
J. Brooks, Red Wing, 
F. A. Holden, AYashington, 
E. D. Neill, do 
J. L. Sibley, Cambridge, 
J. Watts lie Peyster, N. Y., 
Quebec Litcr'y and Hist. Seciety, 
John C. Terry, 
U. S. Sanitary Commission, 
J. C. Hall, Minneapolis, 




6 
6 
6 
5 



T. S. Parvin, Iowa, - - - - - 3 

American Antiquarian Society, - - - 2 

Rev. S. Hopkins Emery, His., - - - - 2 

^y. B. Griswokl, Mankato, - . - 2 

James Starkcy, - - - - - 2 

Charles AYhiltlcsey, Ohio, - - - - 2 

Mrs. G. 11. Woods, Minneapolis, - - - 2 

Unknown, ------ 2 

Long Island Historical Society ; Mercantile Library 
Association, Boston; X. H. Hist. Society; Numis- 
matic and Antiquarian Society, Wisconsin Hist. 
Society, Gen. C. C. Andrews, Robert Clarke, L. 
E. Fisher, Geo. Gray, A. Goodrich, Sherwood 
Hough, D. W. Hoyt,* T. J. King, J. R. Lucas, 
Rev. Thos. Marshall, Brantz jNIayer, A. Mitchell. 
T. H. Presncll, A. J. Reed, Dr. T. C. Schell, W. 
Hudson Stephens, C. C. Trowbridge, A. B. Wey- 
mouth, Chas. M. Wetherell, one each, - - -4 



Pictures. — By the City of Bergamo, Crayon Portrait of 
Beltrami; by Prof. Wm. F. Phelps, Winona, two photo- 
graphs of events in the life of Washington ; by G. 
Fahncstock, 14 photograghic copies of rare ]\ISS., portrairs, 
prints, &c. ; Maj. Lawrence Taliaferro, two portraits of 
Nicollet. 



DONORS TO THE MUSEUM. 



Curiosities. — Knot of a tree, shaped like a human fi\ce, 
4 



26 



A^nsrUAL REPOKT OF THE 



presented by AVm. Moore, ^Jinncapolis ; by John S. Prince, 
piece of boiler of John Eumsey, which exploded Nov. 4, 
1864 ; by Senator Eamsey, a cane formed of wood from the 
dead line" at Andersonville ; by Maj. Taliaferro, his 
official letter seal, 1819—1849 ; by Gov/S. Miller, ballots 
cast at the first electoral college, in Minnesota; by Frank 
Slocum, piece of an oak tree, thirty feet from the ground, 
with a deer's horn imbedrlod in it ; by Chas. E. Mayo, curi- 
ously worm-eaten piece of a ship's keel. 

Akciij:ology. — By William Armstrong, a flint arrow 
head; by Smithsonian Institute, a box of weapons, cos- 
tumes, &c., from the Polynesian Islands ; by A. Van Yorhes, 
two pieces of aboriginal pottery. 

Papers, &c., — By Dr. Schell, a Japanese paper; b}^ Mrs. 
Dr, Post, copies of English papers, 1815 to 1817; L. E. 
Fisher, copy of Yokaharaa (Japan) Times : Buflalo Patriot, 
June 18, 1822; James Hughes, Hudson, AVis., files of the 
Minnesota Clu'onicle, 1849. 

Coins. — B}^ Wm, Armstrong, Washington Co., two silver 
coins, one a shilling of 1563 ; b}^ Dewitt C. Tousley, thirty- 
one copper coins of various countries. 

Manuscripts. — By Hon. Frank Steele, deed of Chippewa 
Point, Minn., dated 1831, said to be the oldest deed in Miu- 
sota""; by Dr. A, K. Smith, Fort Snelling, Meteorological 
Peports, May to December : by Lawrence Taliaferro, 216 
MSS. relating to Minnesota aflairs from 1819 to 1849. 

DONORS TO CABINET OF NATUILVL HISTOKY. 

Stuffed Birds. — By R. O. Sweeney, Pclicanus Amcr- 
icanus, Mergus ]Morganser Serrator, Colym])us Glacialis, 
Podiceps Crystatus — also, eight birds names not given ; by 
Dr. H. H. Fames, Pclicanus Americanus ; by Dr. B. Mat- 
tocks, fresh water Turtle, prepared. 

Minerals. — By Judge Wm. McCarthy, fossils in ^Ing- 
nesian Limestone ; Dr. J . C. lihodcs, Co]")per and other 
minerals found in Stillwater; Rev. John Ireland, specimen 
of Irish Peat, and same from Indiana; by Dr. M. L. Picree, 
Sulphuret of Iron, of the preteroid formation. 



MFN^N'ESOTA HISTORICAL SOCIETY. 



PERIODICALS RECEIVED AND PRESERVED. 



QUARTERLY. 

New England Historical and Genealogical 

Register, _ - - Boston. 

Essex Institute and Hist. Collections, Salem, 
Heraldic Magazine, - - -• Boston. 

Iowa Hist. Society Annals, - - Iowa City. 



MONTHLY. 

Notes and Queries, - - London. 

Minnesota Teacher, - - - Owatonna. 

Historical Magazine, - - New York. 

Western Book Seller, - - Chicago. 

Davis Family Record, - - Meriden, Conn. 

Farmer's Union, - - - Minneapolis, 



WEEKLY. 



North "^^cstern Chronicle, 
Northfield Recorder, - 
St. Cloud Times, - 
St. Cloud Journal, - 
St. Peter Tribune, - 
Mankato Record, - ; 
Shakopce Spectator, 
Rochester Post, 
Brownsville Free Press, - 
Wabashaw Herald, - 
Dakota County Union, 
Central Republican, - 
Shakopce Argus, - 
St. Charles Herald, - 
Waseca News, 
jMower County Register, 
Anoka County Press, 
Stillwater jNIessenger, 
Sauk Centre Heraid, 
Free Homestead, 
Valley Herald, - 
Taylor's Falls Reporter, 
Owatonna Journal, 
Chatfield Democrat, - 
Argus, - 



St. Paul. 

Northfield. 

St. Cloud. 

St. Cloud. 

St. Peter. 

Mankato. 

Shakopce. 

Rochester. 

Brownsville. 

AVabashaw. 

Hactnigs. 

Faribault. 

Shakopec. 

St. Charles. 

Waseca. 

Austin. 

Anoka. 

Stillwater. 

Sauk Centre. 

Winnebago City 

Chaska. 

Taylor's Falls. 

Owatonna. 

Chatileld. 

Red Wing. 



28 



ANOTAL REPORT OF THE 



Miunesota South AVest, 
Mantorviile Express, 
Gazette, - 
Garden City Herald, 
Glencoe Eegister, 
Lake City Leader, 
Henucpin County Democrat, 
Dodge County ]\cpublican, 
Le Sueur Democrat, - 
Winona Republican, 
Con well's North Star, 
Southern Minnesotian, 
Republican, - - 
Houston County Journal, 
Brownsville Free Press, 
Goodhue County Republican, 
Freeborn County Standard, - 



Blue Earth City. 

Mantorviile. 

Hastings. 

Garden City. 

Glencoe. 

Lake City, 

Minneapolis. 

Kasson. 

Le Sueur. 

Winona. 

Minneapolis. 

Rushford. 

Preston. 

Caledonia. 

Brownsville. 

Red Wing. 

Albert Lea. 



FROM WISCONSIN. 



Superior Gazette, 
Prescott Journal, 
Polk County Press. 



Superior, Wis. 
Prescott. 
Osceola Mills. 



DAILIES. 



Daily Pioneer, 
Daily Press, - 
Daily Tribune, 



St. Paul. 
St. Paul. 

Minneapolis, 



All the Minnesota and Wisconsin publications are do- 
nated to the Society by the publishers. The others are 
subscribed for. 



MINNESOTA HISTORICAL SOCIETY. 

MEMBERS. 



•HONORAEY. 

Judge Asa Owen Aldis, St. Albans, Vt. 

George Bancroft, is'ew York. 

Chas. I. Bii.sluiell, Xew York. 

Gen. J. AVatts I)e Peyster, Tivoli, Xew Y'ork. 

Dean Dndle}-, Boston. 

G. W. rahnostock, Philadelphia. 

Rt. Rev. T. L. Grace, St. Paul. 

Dr. P. V. liaydcn, Washington. 

Prof. Joseph Henry, do 

E. D. Jranslield, Cincinnati, 

• Gen. R. B. Marcy, U. S. A., St. Louis. 

Sig. Gabriele Rosa, Brescia, Italy. 

I. Daniel IJupp, Philadelphia. 

Gen. II. S. Saiiford, Brussels. 

Hon. Wm. II. Seward, Washington. 

John L. Sibley, Cambridge, Mass. 

Dr. J. V. C. Smith, ..Boston. 

Maj. Lawrence Taliaferro, Bedford, Pa. 

Rt. Rev. Henry B. Whipple, Faribault. 

CORRESPONDING. 

Rev. Wm. Barry, Chicago. 

Samuel Bonczct, Apalachicola! 

Rev. John Black, Fort Gany. 

Richard C. Bardick, Fort Garry. 

Thomas Clark, Superior, Wis. 

Judge David Cooper, Nevada. 

Rev. B. F. Crary, Saint Louis! 

Lyman C. Draper, Madisou, Wi^. 

Gen. Setl) Eastman, U. S. A Washinatou 

F. A. lloldfu, do 

James Hughes, Hudson, Wis. 

Hon. J. K. Ingersoll, Fhiladt-lphia. 

Dr. B. Knickerbocker, Fort Ransom, D, x. 

John .lay Knox, '••.Washington'. 

Dr. I. A. Lai)ham, '. Milwaukee. 

Joseph Lemay Pembina. 

Ex. Gov. Strplicn Miller, Philadelphia. 

' James ilills, Pittsburijh. 

Hon. J. W. North, Knoxville, Tenn. 

S. B. Olmsted, Texas 

Prof. T. S. Parvin, Iowa Citv.* 



30 ANKUAJj REPORT OF THE 

Dr. Chas. A. Tope, St. Louis. 

Eev. S. E. Eiggs, Bcloit, Wis. 

Alex. Eoss, Fort Garry. 

Gen. J. 11. Simpson, U. S. A., Washington. 

rrederick Somers, New York. 

Dr. A. K. Sraitli, U. S. A., Fort Snelling. 

Henr}' Stevens, London, .Eng. 

C. C.Trowbridge, Detroit. 

Eev. J. F. Tuttle, D. D., Crawfordsville, Ind. 

CoL Chas. Whittlesey, Cleveland, 0. 



ACTIVE MEMBEES. 

LIFE. 

Wm. L. Ames, St. Paul. 

Simon W. Arnold Isew York. 

D. A. J. Baker, Eoseville. 

Wm. L. Banning, St. Paul. 

J. W. Bass, do 

Geo. L. Becker, do 

Peter Berkey, do 

William Branch, do 

John B. Brisbin, do'' 

J. C. Biirbnnk, do 

John M. Castuer, do 

A. H. Cathcart, do 

O. E. Co-wles, Chicago. 

Wm. Constans, St. Paul. 

C. P. Daley, New York.' 

Gen. N. J. T. Dana, Sau Francisco. 

James Day.* Minneapolis. 

Lyman C. Dayton, St. Paul, 

D. W. C. Dunwell, Montana! 

Erastus S. Edgertou, St Paul 

A. S.Elfelt do 

Chas. D. EJfelt, do 

J. L. Farwell, do 

Wm. H. Forbes, do 

Frederick Freudeureich, do 

Alpheus Fuller, Fort Eandall. 

David Guerin, St. Paul. 

Vetal Gucrin do 

Geo. HadtUld, M. D., Cincinnati. 

A. F. Eowcs, St. Peter. 

B. F. Iloyt, St. Paul. 

Jno. E. Irvine, do 

Harwood Iglchart, Annapolis, Md. 

N. W. Kittson, St. Paul. 

A. L. Larpenteur, do 

W. G. Le Due Hastings. 

Henry F. Masterson, St. Paul 

J. C. Martin, Chica-o'. 

Henry L. :Moss St. Paul. 

Gov. Win. E. ]\Larshall do 

Charles A. Morgan, do 

Judge E. ]». Xelson, do 

Eev. E. D. Keill,.. WashiuLrton. 

John Nicols, V-\u\ 

L. M. Oliver, '..Canada'. 

Parker Paine, gt ' p.^^l" 



* Died since the Report wa.s completed. 



MINNESOTA HISTORICAL SOCIETY. 



31 



C. J. Pcttys, San Francisco. 

J. P. Pond, St. Paul. 

John S. Prince, * do 

Hon. Alexander Ramsey, do 

J. C. Ka^l^ey, do 

John Kandall, do 

Hon. Edmund liice,...'. do 

D. A. IxobertsoD, do 

Daniel Piohrer, do 

J. S. Sewell, do 

Gen. H. H. Sible}-, do 

Truman M. Smitli, do 

John B. Spencer. '. do 

Franklin Steele, do 

Geo. W. Sweet Sauk Kapids. 

Moses C. Tuttle, St. Paul. 

T. J. Vaiden, Ripley, Tenn. 

Isaac Van Etten,, St. Paul. 

John Esaias Warren, Chicago. 

J. E. Whitney, St, Paul. 

M. S. Wilkinson, Mankato. 

Chas. L. Willis, St. Paul. 

/ James M. Winslow, do 



Samuel E. Adams, Monticello. 

Dr. A. E. Ames, Minneapolis. 

Jared Benson, Anoka. 

Judge John M. Berry, Faribault. 

R. Blakeley, St. Paul. 

Joseph R. Brown, Lake Traverse. 

Rev. L. Caiilet St. Paul. 

Col. E. A. Calkins, do 

Henry L. Carver, do 

Charles Cavileer, Pembina. 

J. B. Chanev St. Paul. 

O. A. Churchill, Little Falls. 

Geo. Culver, St. Paul. 

C. K. Davis, do 

Wm. B. Dean, do 

Dr. C. Dc Moutrcville. do 

Hon. Ignatius Donnelly, Hastings. 

Hon. M. H. Diinncll, St. Paul. 

Heurv IL Fames, do 

E. F.'EIv, do 

A. Falkenshiold, do 

Thomas Foster, Hastings. 

Dr. Lewis H, Garrard, Frontenac. 

Hon. Chas. D. Gillillan, St. Paul. 

Hon. A. Goodrich, Brussels. 

G. A. Hamilton St. Paul. 

Alfred J. Hill, do 

Hon. Henry Hill, Grcenleaf. 

Hon. Wm. Holrombe, Stillwater. 

Sherwood Hougii St. Paul. 

N. Huktt, Oneota. 

D. W. IngorsoU, St. Paul. 

Rev. John Ireland, * do 

Ricliard Ireland,.. do 

S. P. .lennivon 

Wm. H. Kelloy, " do 



32 



ANNUAL REPORT. 



Henry M. Knox, St. Paul. 

J. K. Lucas, do 

Juo. D. Luddcn, do 

Dr. T. T. Mann, Cottage Grove. 

Win. M. McCarthy, St. Paul. 

A. McElrath do 

Rev. J. McGolrick, . ; do 

S. Y. McMa.^ters, D.])., do 

Judge S. J. 11. McMillan, do 

RevT Thomas ]Nrarshall, Mankato. 

Dr. Brevrer Mattocks, St. Paul. 

Rev. John Mattocks, do 

Chas E. Mavo, : do 

H. Z. Mitchell, St. Cloud. 

J. C- Montfort, St. Paul. 

Dr. J. II. iMurphy, do 

Socrates Xclson,* Stillwater. 

Hon. Dan'l S. Norton, AVinona. 

John P. Owens, St. Paul. 

Prof. Wm. P. Phelps, Winona. 

Dr. M. L. Pierce, St. Paul. 

Dr. J. C. Phodes, Stillwater. 

Hon. Henry M. Kice, St. Paul. 

Col. Heni-y C. PtOgers, do 

Dr. A. Sieguuret, Henderson. 

G. Sidney Smith, St. Paul. 

Col. John H. Stevens, Minneapolis. 

Chas. D. Strong, St. Paul. 

R. O. Sweeney, do 

Hon. Henry A. Swift, St. Peter. 

James W. Taylor, St. Paul. 

Jno. C. Terry, do 

A. Van Vorhes, Stillwater. 

Wm. Wallace St. Paul. 

Chas. A. Warner,* Chaska. 

J. A. Wheelock, St. Paul. 

Rev. T. Wilcoxsen, Hastings. 

J. Pletcher Williams, St. Paul. 

Juo. D. Wilson, do 

Judge Thos. Wilson, Winona. 

S. B. Woolworth, St. Paul. 

Prof. B. P. Wright, do 

Chas. Zimmerman, do 



* Died 1S67. 



i / 

i DONATIONS DESIREH BY THE SOCIETY. 



1. JiOoLs oj rffi'i/ liud, espC'Cially .-^iR-li as relate to Aiiiciitan 

' History, and to the AVest in particailar ; JJioL^n-aj^liiv- : ><-iontitie, (h'<>- 
I grapliical and Statistical works, ike. AVe particularly dtsirc work.- on 
' Minnesota Travels ajid Explorations: City IJ)irect<"'ri''- : Ordinance- 
and Laws of Cities ; Maps ; Copies of the earlier Territurial Law.-; and 
Session Journals of Minnesota, and iiiu.-uof Wisconsin Territory prior 
to 1849 ; and copi's of o't n/ boolc p'''^^*^^^' Minnc-'' fo, or elsewhei'e, 
; written by residenis of tin's State. 

2. .Par/ipJilcf--i of ell kinds; Catalogues of Minno-ora Colleges and 
oilier Institutions of Learning; Annual llei)orts of Societies; Sermons 
and Addresses delivered in this State; Minutes of Church Conventions. 
Syno<ls, or other Ecclesiastical Bodies of Minnesota : and every other 
rani])h]ct relating to this State, aii'l ' • 'here. 

o. Fil.r.-< nf ^fin>:r.<of(L XtArsijajiers and Magazine'^, especially com- 
plete volumes of j)a<t years, or single numbers even, l^ublishers are 
earnestly re(]uested to contribute their publication- regularly, all of 
whicii will be carefully preserved and bound. 

-]. jfatcr'fiJs for Miuiicsota J£iiloi>/ : Old Letters, Journals, and 
Manuscri2:>t ZSTarrations of tlie Pioneers of ^finnesotr*. ; Original Papers 
on tlie Eal'ly Jli.-tory and Settleniem of the Terriiory : Adventures 
and Contlicis during the Indian War; 3>iograj)hies of the Pioneers of 
every County, either living or deceased, together wirli their portraits 
and autographs. 

5. Ci</'/ox/7/':.3 of all kiiids for our r>ruseuui ; Coins; Medals; Paint- 
ings; Portraits; Engravings; Statue.-; V^ar Pielics; Antograph Letters 
of distii!gui>hed persons, etc. 
; (,). Faci.i Vb'iirof'a-c of otrr Indirra Tribc.< ; their History, Charac- 
teristics, Religion, tVc.; Sketches of tJieir pji'ominenr Chiefs, Orators, 
and Warriors, together with contributions of Indian Weapons, Orna- 
ments, Curio,-.! ties and Implements. 

7. J)r(iiri]i(js;^ Jf(/p.s, and dc^icriptlons of Ai^'Acnt ^founds or 
Fiirlif'-fifiou-< in the State ; t heir size and sha})e, and d< scrij>tion of any 
articles ftnind in them. 

S. 3firirr(fJs, ,S7/^ //.s-, 7- o.sx//.s-, Orr.^, J'rfrifacfion-^, and other speci- 
mens relating to the Natural History of Minnesota. 

{). We ^oUclf from IlUtorical Sociciics and other iiarned Bodies, an 
interchange of books and other article-, j>romising to r^ j>ay such favors 
to tlic full extent of our ability. 
I We trust that evt'ry one receiving this circular wiil vive a generous 
response to tlie above rciiuests. Communications or viunations may 
be addressed, simplv ; — 

"HISTOBICAL SOCIETY," Sr. Pai l. 

JC-.;r All j)ersons who send us doiuitions Mill be ]daced on our 
; exchange list, and n ceive the Publieations of the Soci-. ty in return. 



ANNUAL REPORT 



OF THE 



Minnesota Historical Society 

TO THE 




Read and adopted at the Anntial Meeting of the Society^ 
jfaituary iith, 1S69. 



ST. PAUL: 
PRESS PRINTING COMPANY 
1S69. 




OFFICERS von 18G9. 



FKESIDENT : 

GEO. A. HAMILTON. 

VICE PKE.'iJ DENTS : 

1. GEN. H. H. SIBLEY, 

2. GOV. AVM. E. MARSHALL, 

3. REV. JOHN IRELAND. 

SECRETARY : 

J. FLETCHER WILLIAMS. 

TREASURER : 

ALFRED J. HILL. 



EXECUTIVE COUNCIL 



Rev. John Mattocks, 

Capt. R. Blakeley, 

Rev. S. Y. McMasters, D. D. L. L. 

D. W. Ingersoll, 

Charles E. Mayo, 

D. A. Robertson, 

Hon. E. F. Drake, 

Rev. F. T. Brown, D. D., 

James J. Hiil, 

A. H. Cathcart, 



Jno. D. Luddeu, 
.James P. Pond, 
D., Wm. H. Kelley, 

Dr. R. 0. Sweeny, 

S. B. Woolworth, 

Dr. B. Mattocks, 

J. B. Chanc)', 

Prof. B. F. Wright, 

Peter Berkey, 
And the ollicers of the Society. 



KEPORT OF THE EXECUTIVE COUNCIL. 



The year just closed has been one of such signal prosperity 
"to this Societ}^ that it must always remaiji marked in its 
annals. Even the gratifying progress, thitherto unequalled, 
made by the Society in 18G7, referred to in our last annual 
report in terms of just pride, has been far exceeded by tho 
growth of the Society the past year, in every element of suc- 
cess and progress, until it has now attained an influence and 
■capacity for usefulness, promising for the future, and a just 
f?ource of pride to all our citizens, who now cheerfully ac- 
knowledge its value and importance. 

Five years since, at the reorganization of the Society, we 
had but 82G volumes in our Library. To day it numbers 
over 6,000, bound aud unbound. Such rapid growth is 
almost without parallel, while the present rate of increase 
indicates that in u few months our Library will be the largest 
in the State, as it is already the most valuable. A year ago, 
too, we were meeting in our cramped, dark, illy ventilated 
rooms on Third Street, a mere closet, where our collection 
was packed and piled away in utter confusion. Now, we 
have these commodious, neatly furnished and cheerful apart- 
ments, where our Library and Cabinet is ihoroughl}^ arranged 
and accessible to the public, and so well displayed, that, as 
one of our city i):ipers expressed it — *'it scarcely seems like 
the same societ}-." 

THE LIBRARY. 

During the year 18G8, there were added to the Libuay 
1,1.75 bound vulumos, and 1,101) p;im[)hlcts and unbound 
volumes ; making tho total number of bound volumes now 



ANXUAI> liEPOKT OF THE 



in the Library, 2,380 ; boiiiul and unbound together, 5,962.. 
The progress of the Lil)rary since tlie reorganization of the 



Society in 


loOo, IS best shown by the 


tollowinii: 

o 


table ; 


Ko. Reported in 


Books. 


Pamphlet?. 


Total In Library 


1864, 


826 


1,236 


2,062 


1866, 


- 958 


1,286 


2,224 


1867, 


1,037 


1 ,378 


2,415 


1868, 


- 1,155 


2,136 


3,21)1 


1869, 


2,330 


3,632 


5,962 



It will thus be seen that during the year 1868, our bound 
volumes more than doubled^ T.'hile our i)am[)hlets also in^ 
creased over 66 per cent. 

PRINCIPAL DONORS AND DONATIONS. 

This increase has princi[)a]ly ])ecn of works of a character 
especiall}' suited to our Library, and comprising among thcci 
many very rare and valuable volumes. 

The principal donor the past year was Dr. George AV. 
Fahnestock, of Philadel[>hia, whose sad and untimely death- 
last month, lends an additional interest to the record of his 
munificent gifts to this Society. During the past year we 
received from him altogether 252 bound volumes, and 503 
pamphlets; together with a number of pictures, curiosities, 
<tc., the whole forming l)y hir the largest and most valuable 
donation the Socict}' has yet received from one individual. 
Among them are a number of rare and valuable works on west- 
ern history, long since out of print and didicult to obtain. Car- 
ver's Travels, Drake's Cincinnati, I^reckenridije's Louisiana, 
and others being of this class. The larger part of the col- 
lection, is composed of works on Tennsy Ivania, piii-chased 
exprcssl}' for this Society by Mr. Fahnestock at the sale of 
the famous ^'Hazard Collection." Among them are a lull 
set of the Pennsylvania Colonial Records and reniis\ Ivani:^ 
Archives, 28 volumes; Journals of the Senate and House 
of rcnnsylvania, from 1803 to 1858 ; Journals ot the Mu- 
nicipal bodies of Philadelphia, 34 volumes; a full set of 



MINNESOTA HISTORICAL SOCIETY. 



5 



'Hazard's ^'Register of Pennsj'lvaiiia," 16 volumes; Exccii- 

"tive Documents of Pennsylvania, 17 volumes; seven bound 
volumes of" the Freeman's Journal," 1808-1814 ; 12 bound 
volimies and several unbound volumes of Hunt's jNIercbants' 
Mao:azine, etc., etc. Tiiese works filled five large cases, the 
freight ($50) being generously prepaid by Mr. Fahnestock. 
In his letter accompanying them he says : *' It was my design 

■to send you a collection of works illustrating Pennsylvania 
History ;" and as such it forn^s a valual)le department in our 
Library. Mr. Fahnestock's almost princely generosity — no 
less in this instance than in many others — must cause his 

.name to be always held in grateful remenjbrance by this 
Society. 

From Hon. Alex. Ramsey and Hon. I. Donnelly, we have 
•received repeated favors in the distribution of public docu- 
ments, m.iuy of them of unusual value. Joel Munsell, of 
Albany, j^rescnts us with one bound and sixty-tw^o unbound 
volumes. Frcm Dr. R. O. Sw^eeny we have received 31 
bound and 196 unbound volumes. From Charles F. Johu- 
Bon, 11 bound volumes. From Robert Clark, Cincinnati, 
his recent valuai)le reprint, " Boquet's Expedition," and 
three other choice volumes. Rev. E. D. Neill, of AVash- 
iugtou, former Secretary of this Society and historian of 
^our State, kindly remembers us with his tw^o recent inter- 
esting volumes, "Terra ^Nlariae," and the Fairfaxes," 
together ^Yith 30 pamphlets and man}^ antiquarian matters. 
John J. Knox, Esq., of Washington, also lays us under 
obligations for re[)eated donations of official documents and 
^ other similar gifts. J. A. Stees, of St. Paul, presents 24 
bound and 30 unbound volumes, all relating to Boston. 
L. C. Pixby, Esq,, of Anoka, contributes 11 volumes of 
choice literature; AV. E. Wilson, Esq., 7 do.; Rev. J. 
Marvin, 6 do. ; and A. J. Hill, Esq., 5 do. From C. E. 
Mayo Ave have received 7 bound and 6 unbound volumes; 
.and from J. F. Williams 32 bound and 137 unbound vol- 
umes. Gen. J. Meredith Reed, of Alban3', and Thomas 
W. Field, of Brooklyn, each have our thanks for rare pri- 
•vately printed volumes. The venerable Major Taliaferro, 
.Indian Agent at Fort Snclling from 18 PJ to 18 PJ, also do- 



6 



ANNUAL PtEPORT OF THE 



nates 7 bound and 4 unbound volumes, with valuable MSS. 
and other donations. Capt. R. I>lakeley presents two rare 
works on the history of Illinois, and George A. Hamilton, 
Esq., I on the same subject, which with two volumes from 
Col. D. A. Robertson, form valuable additions to our de- 
partment of Western history. Daniel Rohrer, of St. Paul, 
has donated 6 bound volumes of Minnesota newspapers; 
Orville Brown 5 do., and Col. J. P. Owens 1 do. From 
the State of Rhode Island we have received 10 volumes; 
from the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania, 20 do. ; and from 
the Surgeon General of the United States, 6 quarto volumes 
of the very valuable publications of his oflice. 

DONATIONS FROM SISTER SOCIETIES. 

We must also return our ofrateful acknowlediianents to 
several sister societies for liberal donations. The Buflalo 
Historical Society sends us 18 volumes of P>uffalo City Di- 
rectories, almost a complete set, and 10 unbound volumes. 

The Pennsylvania Historical Society donates 9 bound and 
S unbound volumes, (a complete set of its own valuable 
memoirs,) together with a fac simile of the celebrated 

Wampum Belt" of Peun's Treaty. The JNIassachusetts His- 
torical Society sends 7 volumes of its proceedings. The 
American Antiquarian Society also donates 4 volumes of its 
Transactions, and almost a full set of its pamphlet ])r()ceed- 
ings. We are also indebted to the ]\Iaiue Historical Society 
for a set of its collections, 6 volumes ; to the Wisconsin 
Historical Society for Vol. V. of its collections (unbound) ; 
and to the New Jersey Historical Societ}^ 1 do. We have 
also received from the Chicago Historical Society several 
pam[)hlets, and from the Chicago Academy of Sciences their 
^^r^l volume of Memoirs. The Kssex Institute and the Iowa 
Historical Societies have also regularly coiitril)uted their 
quarterly publications. From the Smithsonian Institution 
we have received Vol. XV of their Contributions to Knowl- 
edge, and their annual report for 18(^7. The Parliamentary 
Lil)rary of Canada a'^o donates a volume, and the Ro3 al 



MINNESOTA lirSTOPJCAL SOCIETY. 



7 



Library, Hague, 4 volumes of the Memoirs of the Royal 
Society of Northern Autiquaries. 

Of the publications of many of the above societies, and 
others, we have full sets, and hope that ere long we may 
have in our Library a complete set of the publications of 
every learned society in the United States. 

OUR PAMPHLET COLLECTION. 

, Our pamphlet collection is growing rapidly, having in- 
creased more than two-thirds the past year. It now num- 
bers about 3,630 separate publications, with but few excep- 
tions choice and desirable, ^-ome of its departments are 
especially complete, and when our bindiiig fund becomes 
established, a number of these should be thoroughly classi- 
fied and bound up, thus making them more accessible and 
useful. We are pleased to notice an increased value set 
upon these publications, though our Librarian still rescues 
many from the paper mill, Many people appear to think 
that because they are bound in cheap, temporary covers, 
their contents are not as valuable as thoui^h clothed in more 
expensive style — but by all scholars and antiquarians their 
value and importance as materials for history is fully recog- 
nized. We again urge on our friends and members to dil- 
ligently gather up documents and pamphlets of all kinds, 
and contribute them to our collection. Each — no matter 
how apparently humble and valueless noio, has a value in 
such collections as ours, and in a few years may be worth 
its weight in gold. 

The principal donors this year are G. W. Fahnestock, 
500; A.L. Mann, N. Y., 3<^8 ; K. O. Sweeny, IDG ; J. 
F. Williams, 137; Joel Munsell, 62; E. D. Neill, 34; 
American Anticpiarian Society, 28, t^-c, with al)out 250 se- 
cured by exchange and purchase. 

MANUSCRIPTS. 

Our Manuscript Department has received many valuable 
additions the past year. Maj. Taliaferro, in addition to the 



8 



ANNUAL RErOKT OF THE 



valuable MS. volumes on c:irly ^liunesota history doDatcd 
last year, sends us another ot the same scries — an Indiaa 
Agent's payment list, cjntaiiiiiig a roll ot several thousand 
Indians made at a payment at St. Peters, in 1832" — curi- 
ous as a specimen of Indian nomenclature. From the same 
donor we have received an Orderly Book of the war of 
1812, of a body of troops stationed at Sackett's Harbor. 
Geo. R. Stuntz contributes a carefully written paper on the 
geology ot Northern Minnesota. J. F. Williams donates 
some Kegimental rolls and descriptive books, militar}' jour- 
nals, scrap books, c^c, purchased at tjie sale of a deceased 
officer's effects. In this connection may be mentioned a 
passport given by Benjamin Franklin while Minister at 
Paris, in 1784, with his auto^^a-aph — a prized relic, donated 
by Dr. E. E. Braun, of Fort Kipley, who found it in the 
garret of a house rented by him in Charlestown, ^Nlass. 
From K. J. Dukes we have received a commission signed by 
Gov. Shirley in 1758, and from B. F. Hoyt, a poll list of 
St. Paul at an election hold in 1850. But by far the most 
interesting and valuable of the additions to this Depart- 
ment, is the original manuscript of Abraham Lincoln's ]Mes- 
sage to the Senate of the United States in 18(33, relative to 
the Sioux barbarities in this State — valuable from its con- 
nection with an important period in our State history, and 
interesting as a memento of the lamented and truly great 
martyr. It is accompanied by several other autographs of ^Ir. 
Lincoln, together with manuscripts referring to the same. 
They are the gift of Kev. E. D. Neill, one of the private 
secretaries of Mr. Lincoln, who found them among his pa- 
pers after his death, and obtained permission from Mr. Lin- 
coln's heirs to present them to this Society. In the same 
portfolio with these MSS. lies an autograph letter of Hon. 
Stephen A. Douglas, presented by 1. V. D. Heard, Esq. 
In glancing at them, one involuntarily thinks of the great 
debate between the two deceased statesmen in 1858, and tho 
still more memorable presidential contest two years subse- 
quent. Truly " historical " are these valued autographs of 
two men who bore such an important part in the great 
events of the past ten years. 



MINNESOTA HISTORICAL, SOCIETY. 
NEWSPAPERS. 



9 



Our success in seciirinir bound files of newspapers the past 
year, has been very gralit ving. At the date of our hist report 
we had only 27 bound volumes of newspapers. Now 109 
are upon ouj- shelves — certainly a flattering increase. Among 
the bound files added, are six volumes of the weekly and 
daily Minnesotian and daily Democrat, 1851-2-3-4-5, pre- 
sented by Daniel Kohrer, Esq., while Col. Jno. P. Owens 
donates the weekly Minucsotian for 1851-2-3, the whole 
adding greatly to our collection of the earlier Minnesota 
papers. G. W. Fahneslock presented uo less than 30 
volumes of Pennsylvania nc^v - ;)..pers, among them a file of 
the Freeman's Journal during the war of 1812-15, Hazard's 
Eegister ot Pennsylvania, 1() vols., and the U. S. Statiotical 
Register, 5 volumes, &c. Orville Brown, Esq., lately pub- 
lisher of the Central Republican at Faribault, has kindly 
donated 5 bound volumes of that paper, from 1858 to 186(3. 
We have also in our collection 22 bound volumes of the 
N. Y. Daily Tribune, 184:8-1855, and 9 volumes of the Xew 
Yorker (of which paper the Tribune was the successor) 
presented by Judge E. R. Nelson, who purchased them ex- 
pressly for this Society, of a person offer ing them for sale, 
at a cost of $100. In addition to the above Ave have had 
bound ll3 volumes of the later Saint Paul papers, so that our 
news])aper collection already has become quite large and 
valuable for so young a society. Persevei'ance in this one 
direction ^vill, in a few years place in our Eibrary huiulreds 
of bound newspaper files, making a collection of the greatest 
value. Our un!>ound liles are also rapidly increasing. Hon. 
John B. Biisbiu has donated 9 volumes of the Daily Pioueer 
and ^linnesotian (1857-8-9). J. F. Williams presents a 
file of the Press for 18G1, and J. B. Bell, the advertising 
agent, a number of volumes of agricultural and other pnj)ors. 

\Vc are still receiving four daily papers, and every weekly 
paper in the State with but two or three exceptions, all dona- 
ted by the publishers. This very generous action on the 
part of j)ersons illy able, in many instances, to afford it, is 
rapidiv |)Iacing our Society in possession of a verv extensive, 
2 



10 



AKiTUAL HKPORT OF THE 



coiupletc and valuable collortion of our State papers. With 
the exception of a short time that our Society was **sus- 
pencled" dunng the war, our (iles reach hack to the first issue 
of ahnost every paper printed in the State prior to 18G1. 

The Society should not longer delay the binding of our 
large collection of newspapers. We have now from 75 to 
lOM volumes that should be boir.id ai once, both for security 
from damage, and facility ot reference. In their present 
condition they are almost valueless. At least $200 will be 
needed for this purpose. They will form when bound, a 
collection of the greatest value to the people of our State. 

THE VALUE OF A .\EVȣrAPEll COLLECTION. 

Indeed, their value and importance as materials for histo- 
ry, cannot be over estimated. Chronicling current events 
and topics, they form almost the sole record ot thousands of 
facts that are not preserved, and cannot be preserved, in any 
other shape. What else so shows the very *'torm and 
pressure of the times?" How can the historians of next cen- 
tury write the story of the great civil contlict without patient 
study of the newspaper collections in our public libraries? 
How can the historian of our own State record its wonder- 
ful career without these very materials we are so strenuously 
urging our members to enrich our collection with ? Every 
step of our State's progress from the organization of the 
Territory, its settlement and development from a wilderness 
hUo a pr()S})erous commonwealth — its varijnl [)olitical hisio- 
ry — the saddening story ol its Indian war, and the brighter 
record of its share in the war for the Union — are all to be 
found only in the newspapers we are so diligently colleeting 
and so carefully preserving. 

Even now they are referred to oftener than, any other de- 
partment of our Library, and we are gratiti«,'d to know that 
they have proved, in some instances, of the very highest 
value and use to parties desiring them as legal evidence of 
various kinds. The titles to i)r()perty, and the descent of 
estates, arc very frequently ba>ed on advertisements of mar- 
riages, deaths, business partnerships, probate and mortgage 



MINTSTESOTA HISTORICAL SOCIETY. ' 11 

notices and other personal and legal advertisements found 
in newspapers. There is scarcely an issue of an obscure 
country paper which does not contain, among its advertise- 
ments, or among its local items, information that years hence 
may affect the property, or perhaps the reputation and even 
the li))erty of some citizen. Such instances occur very fre- 
quently, as every newspaper publisher knows. On several 
occasions lawyers have made long journeys f;'om the interior 
of the State to find, in our newspaper collection, proof worth 
to them perhaps the weight in Ijank notes of the vohime 
containing it. Of some papers published in years gone b}', 
we have the only files in existence. But few beside the pub- 
lishei's of a paper preserve files, and even those are frequent- 
ly destroyed by fire. Hence in a few years files become 
very scarce. It seems therefore a duty to make our collec- 
tion of State papers as complete as possible. Will not our 
members and other citizens use evorj^ endeavor to secure 
them for us ? 

THE CABINET. 

Our Cabinet still continues to receive accessions of value 
and interest. Cai)t. Charles J. Stees donates the flag pre- 
Bcnted by the ladies of St. Paul to Co. G , Sixth :^linn. 
Regt. in 1.S62 — a prized memento of that great struggle in 
which the young men of our State bore their full shnre. 
Aborigiiial pottery, I'cmains of tliat mysterious race which 
3nhal)ited our soil ])rior to the present Indian tribes, have 
been contributed by George S. Lynch, A.Richardson, Rev. 
S. R. Kiggsand Dr. A. I. Comfort, of Fort AVadsworth. 
Charles A. Peterson also presents us with an interesting 
relic of the "Mound Puilders" — a huge stone axe dug out of 
a large mound near Vasa, Minn., being found buried near a 
skeleton of gigantic size, which crumbled to pieces on being 
exposed. Jt is i^y far the linest implement of the Mound 
Builders we have secured, and unmistakably connects 
that singidar race Avith the * 'stone age." Maj. Long, con- 
nected with Gen. Warren's river surve}', also contributes a 
Bmaller implement of stone, found near La Crosse ; and 



12 



A^TNUAL KEPORT OF THE 



Chas. E. Mayo and Wm. Aimslroug some fine arrow beads 
found in Washington County. From Wm. Grul^e we have re- 
ceived what must always be looked on with the greatest in- 
terest— more so as years elapse — the veritable Scalp oj Little 
Crow, the renowned Sioux chieftain and leading spirit of 
the bloody massacre of 18()2. It is tanned^ and thus in a 
measure imperishable, and is certainly a curious memento 
of that dark period in onr State history. Three fine 
curiosities and relics fi 'om the historic field of Gettysburg 
were also donated by ex-Gov. Aliller. They consist of 
fragments of shells, grape shot, limbs of trees with bullets 
thickly imbedded, &c., all handsomely mounted. G. W. 
Fahnestock donated, at the time of his large gift of books, 
■50 pieces colojiial and continental money, assorted by States, 
a valuable and choice collection. A number of varieties of 
rebel currency and bonds have also been received. 

Our collection of Indian relics, stone weapons and remains 
•of the aboriginal tribes, is becoming valual)le, but is still far 
too deficient for a State in which these curiosities so abound. 
They are very frequently found, but are generally sent by the 
■finders to their friends East, and ultimately go to enrich 
private or public cabinets in other States, leaving our own 
meagerly supplied. Certainly, with such facilities for col- 
lection as this State affords, we should have one of the finest 
^rchailogical cabinets in the country. Will not our citizens 
feel local or State pride enough to enrich a cabinet in their 
own State with such curiosities as they may lind? 

MAPS, CHARTS, ENGRAVINGS, (fcC. 

Our map and chart department has made some advance. 
We have now a copy of almost every map of Minnesota, or 
of the North West region, of which Minnesota is a part, 
from the days of Hennepin down ; and curious many of 
them are. Other rare ma[)s and chiuts have also been re- 
ceived from 11. B. Galusha, Charles F. Johnson, Cr. W. 
Fahnestock and others. The most curious is one donated 
hy Thomas 11. Wynne, of Kichmond, Va. It is a fac sim- 



MINNESOTA IIISTOIIICAL SOCIETY. 



13 



ile on copper, engraved in 1819, of the map of Virginia 
in Capt. John Smith's ver}' rare work of 1620. 

I. D. Rui)p, of Phihidelphia, honorary member, has, by 
request, donated a fine ])h()tographic portrait of himself. 
A handsomely framed portrait of G. W. Fahnestock, which 
must always be looked on with interest, was donated ])y the 
Secretary, to whom Mr. F. had presented it. From the 
Pennsylvania Historical Society we have received an en- 
graved fac simile of Penn's Wampum Belt. Some of the 
engraved portraits in our collection have also been framed. 
John McCloud, Jr., has presented three framed daguerreo- 
types of old buildings in St. Paul, two of them now de- 
stroyed by fire. 

. OUR EXCHANGES. 

I 

Our system of exchanges with sister societies and other 
public libraries, has been steadily extended the past year, 
with great advantage to us. At the last session of the 
Legislature the printing law was amended, so as to give to 
the Society a few unbound copies of each of the public 
documents of the State. These have proved valuable to us 
as exchanges, but we have been compelled to have them 
bound fiom our own funds before we could use them as 
such. Some other works, relating to our State, have been 
secured by purchase, to use in presenting to societies which 
have kindly sent us their publications. Jf the Legislature 
would amend the })rinting law, so as to have all State docu- 
ments given to us half-bound, their value as exchanges 
would be much increased. 

THE SEAL OF THE SOCIETi', 

Among the donations the past year must be noticed the 
handsomely engraved Seal of the Society, which Judge A. 
Goodrich, one of our life members, now Sccretaiy^ of the 
Belgian Legation, caused to be exe(5utcd in Brussels at his 
own expense, as a gift to the Society. 



14 ANNUAL REPOP.T OF TIIE 

OUR m-AV KOOMS. 

Allusion was made to the gi-atifying fact that since our 
last annual report, we have been provided by the State with 
suitable apartments in the basement of the State Capitul. 
The last Legishiture made an appropriation for this purpose, 
and soon after the work was commenced under direction of 
the Governor. In October last we took possession of these 
apartments, which are certainly very suitable to our wants. 
They are 24 by 48 feet in size, with an II foot ceiling, well 
lit by four large windows, and in every way pleasant and 
commodious. They are supplied with fuel and gas by the 
State, while neat glazed shelving has been provided for our 
more valuable books. Another room, attached to it, has 
been plainly shelved oiY for the storage of our public docu- 
ments, unbound books, and newspapers. Thus the probable 
increase of our Lil)rary for several years to come is provided 
with accommodations. By the above liberal and enlightened 
legislation, the Society has been placed in better circum- 
stances than ever before. The rooms are central, and so 
much more accessible to the public than before, that our 
Library has been consulted by more citizens ihe past three 
months, than in as many years previously, while in our old 
rooms. The improvement has added to the permanent value, 
as well as the appearance and comfort of the building, and 
the wisdom of the move has been fully vindicated. 

But we are as yet deprived of much of the advantages of 
the location, by the fact that no arrangements have been 
made whereby the rooms can be kept open, and our Library 
thus made accessible to the public during stated hours. Our 
librarian is as yet only such in n;ime, no compensation being 
attached to the ofllce, and his ov/n occupation has of course 
prevented him Irom keeping the rooms open at any regular 
hours. Thus far the Janitor of the Capitol has kindly shown 
visitors into the room, but the number is so rapidly increas- 
ing, it has become too great a tax on his time to do this 
gratuitously. Some arrangement should be made at once, 
whereby free access of the public to our Library can be se- 
cured during certain regular hours. 



MINJSTESOTA HISTORICAL SOCIETY. 



15 



rUBLICATlONS OF TIIK SOCIETY. 

During iho past two years wc have })een compelled to 
forego the publication of our valuable and important manu- 
script materials for history, our funds being needed for more 
ursfent uses. The issue of our * 'Collections" should be 
resumed ere long, as our citizens arc thereby encouraged to 
contribute historical papers that ma}^ draw forth treasures 
of material for the history of our State. There are two 
examples of the successful results of this : the Iowa Historical 
Society, which publishes a quarterly magazine devoted to 
securing' and publishing scraps of Iowa history; and the 
Wisconsin Historical Society, \\hicli is allowed to print 150 
pages a year at the expense of the State, three of the annual 
pamphlets (being consecutivel}^ P'^ged) forminir a volume. 
We have still on hau l, however, a quantity- of the pamphlets 
forming our second \ olume of collections. 

IN SIEMOIilAM — G. W. FAIINESTOCK. 

Reference has already been made to the sudden and 
untimely death of Geo. W. Jb'^ahnestock, of Philadelphia, — 
Honorary member of this Society — which occurred on the Gth 
of December in the awful steaUiboat disaster near AVarsaw, 
K}'. Mr. Fahnestock was born in Chambersburg, Pa., Sept. 
23d, 1823, but liv. d most of his life in Philadelphia. He 
was reared in aiiluence, and inherited a large fortune. 
Possessed, it seci.ied from his boyhood, of literary and anti- 
quarian tastes, this enabled him to gratify them, and he spent 

most of his time in the collection of books and pamphlets 

especially the latter - and at the time of his death liad one 
of the iinesi private collections of pamj)hk'{s in the country, 
amounting to 85,000. Mr. Fahnestock spent about a year 
in Saint l^iul in ](S()()-7, for the bonelit of his wile's health. 
He visited our rooms very frerjucntly while hei'e, and felt a 
great interest in this Societ} , and made us many very hand- 
some and valuable donations, amounting in all to al)out 300 
bound volumes, 1,000 pami)hlets, a large number of curios- 
ities, pictures, c^c, besides gifts in money, the whole 



]6 ANNUAL KEPORT OF THE 

amounting to over $1,000 ?ii v.iliic. Mr. Fahnestock was 
one of the mo^t liberal and generous of ' men. He was con- 
stantly making lai'gc donations to charitaMe and religious 
purposes, and to public institutions, and seemed to take 
pleasure in using his wealth for the good of others. Uniting 
solid virtues to pleasing graces of person and polished man- 
ners, his modest worth, UDaflV'cted simiilicity of character, 
christian phihuithropy, and systematic benevolence, made 
bim universally beloved. His death — which caused the most 
siucere sorrow among his large circle of acquaintances in 
every part of the country — v/as appropriately noticed at a 
meeting of our Society on Dec. 15th, when a written memoir 
was read, and several membcis pronounced fitting tributes 
to the deceased. In his death our Society has lost its most 
generous patron. It had been his intention — expressed to 
intimate Iriends at Philadelphia, as well as to members uf 
this Society — to leave to it by will, a liberal bequest; but 
before he could arrange his aflairs so as to do this, he was 
suddenly and untimely cut off. 

THE FINANCES OF THE SOCIETY. 

The receipts and expenditures of the appropriation made 
to the Society by the last Legislature, are given in the re- 
port of the Treasurer, the vouchers therefor accompanyic^f 
the same. The small amount of means placed at the dis- 
posal of the Society has been carefully hu>banded, and used 
to pay merely the current expenses of the Society. For 
actual increase of the library, we have ex[)ended only $42. SO 
in purchasing books, and $1-1 in binding — a portion of the 
latter being tor our exchanges. 

A BINDING FUND NEEDED. 

. One of our ])rincii">al wants is a fund for"l)indiiig. Throe 
hundred dollars expended in that ditection now would bind 
a large proi)ortion of our newspapeis and pamphlet serials, 
thus placing on our shelves fully three hundred bound vol- 
umes. After this first expenditure, quo hundred dollars 



V 



MINNESOTA HISTOIMCAL SOCIETY. 17 



per aiinum will bind up all the accuiuulations from year to 
year. Perhaps a permanent luiul for thi^ purpose could be 
raissd by subj^cription, or the sale of life memberships. 
Fifteen hundred dollars invested in securities would yield 
about one hundred dollars per annum — enough, it is esti- 
mated, for our wants in that direction for several years. 

A Fir.E-riiOOF BUILDING. 

Nor should we lose sight of the fact that in a very few 
years we will require a fire-proof building for our Library. 
These now commodious apartments, at the present rate of 
increase of our Library, will scarcely accommodate us longer 
than six or eight years, and unless the Capitol should be 
enlarged — of which there is little probability — we will again 
be compelled to remove to more commodious quarters. 
Besides, it should be borne in mind that our present rooms 
are uot strictly fire-proof, though very secure, and the risk 
of losing our valuable collection is considerable. At pres- 
ent, while it consists of only a few hundred volumes, in a 
room easily accessible, on a ground floor, it could be readily 
saved in case of fire ; but with its increase also increases 
the danger and the loss, if destroyed. 

We should therefore take early and energetic steps to- 
wards the erection, on the lots owned by the Society ad- 
joining the Capitol, of a fire-proof building sufficiently large 
to accommodate at least 50,000 volumes. Such a build- 
ing, if built without any unnecessary ornament, but merely 
with reference to strength and security, could probably be 
erected for $20,000, a sum which we certainly ought to be 
able to raise, and should lose no time in commencing. In- 
deed, one of our oldest members has already ollered to give 
$1,000 towards such a building, provided the balance shall 
be raised by subscription, and when completed, to donate to 
the Society a most valuable collection of St. Paul newspa- 
pers, from the first issue of the Pioneer, 20 years ago, to 
the present date. Will not this generous oiler, made volun- 
tarily, call forth a response from other members of the So- 
ciety? The subscriptions might be made payable in five au- 
3 



18 



ANNUAL REPORT OP TILE 



imal instiilmcnts, for instance, thus being comparatively 
easy of payment — the fund in the meantime being invented 
in some interest-bearing securities. We believe we have 
man}^ wealthy and liberal citizens who would take pleasure 
in contributing to the erection of a fire-proof building for 
the Society, which would at once be a monument to their 
liberality, and a blessing to posterity. 

INCREASED APPROPrvIATIOXS NEEDED. 

We again urge upon the Legislature the necessity of 
somewhat increasing the annual appropriation to our Society. 
Five hundred dolhirs isscare^ly sutficient to pay the ordina- 
ry current expenses of the Society, conducted in the mjst 
economical manner. It allows us almost no means to in- 
crease our Library by purchase or binding, and none to 
secure the care and attendance of a properly qualified olHcer 
to discharge the duties of Secretary and Libiarian, which 
seems now the prime wnnt of the Society. A slightly in- 
creased allowance would many fold increase its ctiecti\ e- 
ness. 

Wisconsin has for several 3'ears allowed its Historical 
Society from $4,000 to $5,000 per year, and Iowa now gives 
its Historical Society the sum of $3,000 per annum. One 
thousand dollars is the least sum ^Minnesota should think of 
giving its Societ^^ 

The State would largel}^ be the gainer by this course. 
Our Library could be increased rapidly, and would soon be- 
come the largest and most valuable in the State. Every 
book, pamphlet, picture, SiC.^ in our col'-oction is in one 
sense State pro])crty. The Society cannot sell, give away, 
or convert to the use of its members, a single cent's worth 
of its ellects. If it dissolves, the State becomes the posses- 
sor of its collection. We are but the trustees to accumulate, 
preserve and nianage, for the beueiit of the jieoj^Ie of ^lin- 
nesota, a Library, Cabinet, v.V:c., and to collect material for 
the history of our State. 

Xo other Library, or Society in the State docs, or can, 
occupy the field which we do, or perform the work ^vhi^.•h 



MIXNESOTA IIISTOIIICAL SOCIETY. 



19 



"vvc propose to do, iind our liaudsomc success the past year 
on very limited means, is but an earnest of what we could 
accomplish, with enlarged resources. 

A rURCHASIXG FUND NEEDED. 

While we can accumulate by donations many vabiable 
works, it is only by purchase that we can pursue the col- 
lection of works in any particuLar department, and *'sort 
up," if the phrase may bo allowed, our Library generally. 
AVo should have at once $1,000 to complete our collection 
on ^ycstern history and early explorations in Minnesota — 
already very valuable, but needing a number of books for 
which calls arc irequently made. The works we desire are 
not in any pu1)lic Library in the State. Such a re[)roach 
ought no lonirer to exist, especially as the State is now 
abundantly a!>le to remedy it. By no better hands than 
those of this Society, could the funds for that purpose be 
expended. Among our members are a number of gentle- 
men of life -long experience and constant practice in the 
collection of books, and the appropriation would be made 
to yield the largest returns. There are many other reasons 
why this Society would be the proper custodian for such a 
trust, but we need not enumerate them here. 

THE DANGER OF DELAY. 

It should be done, too, without delay. The old pioneers 
of the Stale, from whom we expect to obtain the most val- 
uable material for its earl}' liistory, are year by year disap- 
pearing, and we are thus losing what no industry or outlay 
hereafter can rt plaee. J->ooks, too, on the early histoiy of 
the country, are fast being garnered into the many lino private 
and pul)lie lil.uai ies which the rapid increase of wealth and 
intelligenee, in this country are causing to spring up every- 
where, and this will not oiil\' render sueh books very scarce 
and dillieult to ol)tain, but will d()ul)le or treble their price. 

For other reasons, too, it is full time the work was com- 
menced. We have now in this State a population of nearly 



20 



ANNUAL REPORT OF TIIE 



half a million. In another c^^c:idc it is safe to say a million 
persons will chvell in Minnesota. For the education of these 
coming hosts in our schools and university, the most liberal 
provision has been made. A great public library, wisely 
managed, is as valuable and necessary a portion' of our edu- 
cational system as normal schools, or an university — and let 
not those who come after us, call us to account for neirleclino^ 
its timely and proper accumulation. Hence, it is not so much 
for the men and women of this generation, as of those to 
come, that we are discharging this duty, of accumulating 
here a well managed library, rich in every department of 
learning; combining not only the materials for the history 
of our State, its statistics and ihc annals of its progress, but 
those of our country generally, and above and beyond this, 
the treasures of its philosophy and science, ot its art and its 
poetry, and in fine, the lore of every age and every people. 



St. Paul, Jan. 11, 1860. 



MESTNESOTA HISTORICAL SOCLETT. 



21 



LIST OF DONOHS TO LIBRARY— 1868. 



Bound 
Vols. 



Pamphlets. 



Thomas ]>owcr, St. Paul 

J. H. lUniesoD, Ann Arbor, Mich 

H. Bokmn. Tennessee 

K. Bhikelev, St. Paul 

B. C. Burdick, Red River 

Cliicago Acad. Sciences 

Chicag-o Historical Society 

J. B. Chancy, St. Paul 

H. A. Castle, St. Paul 

Commonwealth of Pa 

Robert Clarke, Cin., 

Hon. ]y:riatius Donnelly, Wash 

Dr. C. H. S. Davis, Merlcleu, Conu.... 

Samuel G. Drake, Boston 

Benj. Drew, Chelsea, Mass 

Essex Inst 

Rev. S. H. Emery, Illinois 

Richard Eddy, Philadelpliia 

Geo. W. Ealinestock, Philadelphia 

Thomas W. Field, Brooklyn 

F. W. Frink, Faribault 

H. L. Gordon, St. Cloud 

R. B. Galu.^lia, St. Paul 

Hon. Geo. Gale, Galesville, Wis 

Alfred J. Hill, St. Paul 

Charles Hairi^ertv, St. Paul 

F. B. Hubbell, Troy, N. Y 

Horatio Gates Jones, Philadelphia 

Cliarles F. Johnson, St. Paul 

J. Jl. Kloos, Sauk Rapids 

J. A. Kicster, ]Uue Earth City , 

Wm. H. Kelley, St. Paul 

Henry M. Knox, St. Paul , 

John Jay Knox, Washinirton , 

Dr. I. A. Lapham, Milwaukee 

Jno. D. lAiddcn, St. Paul 

Prof. O. C. Marsh, Yale CoUe-e 

W. }L Mitchell, Rochester, Minn 



4 


29 


18 


14 


11 






2 
7 




2 


2 


1 


1 


2 


1 . 






2 




20 


20 




2 


2 


10 










2 




1 




1 


2 


1 


1 




252 


500 


1 






10 




4 


2 


1 


1 




5 


8 


3 




2 




1 




14 






3 








1 


1 


10 


2 


17 




1 


1 


7 




5 




3 


7 


6 



22 



AIO'UAL REPORT. 



* . . Bound 

Vols. Pamphlets. 

Massachnsetts Historical Society 7 

Rev. J. Marvin, St. Paul 6 

Dr. Brewer Mattocks 1 1 

IIou. W. P. Murray, St. Paul '.. 1 1 

Joseph Mc(^loud, St. Paul 1 

Dr. T. T. Maun, Cottage Grove 11 10 

Joel MunselU Albany."..." 1 G2 

Maine Historical Society 6 

Alfred Moore, St. Paul 3 

Naval Observatory, Was]iin;L'"ton 1 

Rev. Echvard D. Xeill, \Va<liiDi,non 2 32 

New Jersey rii^torical Society :.. 1 

Prof. Benjamin Pierce, Wasbinijtou 1 

Parliamentary Library, Canada 1 

Pennsylvania Historical Society 9 8 

J. P. Pond; St. Paul .* 3 

Prof. Wm. F. Plielps, AVinona 105 

Hon. Alex. lianisey, Washinirton 10 6 

Gen. J. :Meredith Kead, Albany 1 

State of Pljode Island 10 

D. A. Robert-oil, St. Paul 4 

Daniel Rohrer, St. Paul 6 

Hon. H. M. lace, St. Paul 1 

David Ramaley. St. Paul 7 

Gabriel Rosa, Brescia, Italy 2 

R oy a 1 L i In-a ry , Hague 4 

D. H. Ruckcr. Quartermaster General ' c 

Saint Paul Library 1 

Dr. J. H. Stewart', St. Paul 20 

Gen. Ira Spauldius: 4 

lion. E. Geo. Sqail^r, N. Y 1 

Dr. S. J. Sawyer. X. Y 3 

Dr. J. V. C. Smith, N. Y 3 

Smithsonian Institute, Washington 1 

Dr. E. H. Smith, St. Paul . . . . 6 

Surgeon General U. S., Washington 6 

John A. Stees. St. Paul 24 30 

Dr. R. O. Sweeny. St. Paul 31 19g 

Rev. J. F. Tuttle, Crawtbrdsville, Indiana 7 

Herman Trott, St. Paul . 3 

Jno. C. Terry, St. ]\'iul 1 

Maj. Lawrence Taliaferro. Bedford, Pa 7 4 

J. Fletcher Williams, St. Paul 32 137 

W. L. Wilson. St. Paul 7 

J. A. Willari!. Mankato 10 

Wisconsin Ili-tcMical Society 4 

Col. Charles Whittlesey, Cleveland 2 

Prof. J. Wynian, Harvard Colleire 1 

Lieut. E. M. Wood, West St. Paul 1 



DONATIONS miMD M THE gOSIBTY. 



1. Booh'! of ern-ru l-ind, especi;illy such as relate to American n:?t'";r; . 
and to tlie West in particular; Biogi'aphies ; Scicntltio, GcograpbiiMl ai.a 
Slatistical \s orl:-, vvn, \\> pariu 'uuio-j aoir;.' works on ML'jnosota Travels 
and Explorations City Directories; Ordinances .and La^vs of ( ' 
Mnp<; Conies of '.f!--? oi^rlier Territorial La^A's and Sos-^ioii Jonv 
Minnesota, auU ti.orse 01* S^''jieou.S}u Territory prior to io40; and r 

r-:i\r-j booT: pnnt.'A i,i jfiiLnesof". I :''.-■.» t!io<-.; jvl;^ ' . ■s(;\vlicr?. . 
by resident"? of tli^s Stat'.;. 

2. ■• PamphUta of o.n kinds: C j. • !.•..•:•.-••.; ...1 
In^titutionj^ of Learning; An-"".'-^ -r, ^j^. <;f,cjeties: Sermons r- 
dresses delivered in tills State; Minu{:es of Church Conventions, S". 
or other EcciesiasLicai isouies of Mmn'.'iota: and every other P; '. 
relaiiug to thi.-? State, as M-ell as pamphlets on all subjects publi^'! 
ivhere. 

o. .Files of jlinnesota JSVivspapcrs mid 3Ia^a::ines, especially co' 
vo]u)ue> of pa^-; y.\'irs, or single nursibers even. Pubiisiiers are ea: 
requested tu c^'Utribute t]ieir^pu'}lica*:ious regularly, all of which . 
carefully presc-rvod and boiiau. 

4. Materials f>r Ninnf.sot.a U.istorii : Oid Letl^;r3, Journals, and : r:v ; 
script Narrations of the Pioneers of Minnesota; Original Papers 
Early History ajjd Seitlement of the Territory; AdvL-nturos and C'.. 
diirin^^; the Indian W;ir; J-jiogTsphles of the Pioneers of every Cou:i:; 
eit her iiviu:^ or deceased, together v.'lLh their portraits and autoirra: '. - . 

.5. Curio^lrie^ of all ivindvS for oi-r niusenm : Coins; Medals ; Pai- : 
Portraits: K.-irraviugs : ol ;• " -; Auto:^raph Letters ^ 

tinguirdied pers;>ns, etc. 

G. F'icCs ill ay:f}-atii-e of our I'K n Trib-:^: Xiicir History, Character! 
^ics. Iier!.-:!un, ice; Sketches of their prominent Ciiiefs, Orators, a 
\Va3 riors, to.£;ei her with, coutribulions of Tud'.aii V>'(. -n:)iis, Ornanser.i- 
Cur ositles arid Implements. 

7. V/'e sodrii froTii Ilifi.'nvical ^o'ii':.ii'-s. and other learned Bodies. Pu' 
lie Lihruries, Colleges, ic., an iut''rchai];.;i> of boo'cs and other .' ' 
promising %o repay such favors to the full extent of (-ar al.dlity. 

^Ve trust t ving this circular will give 

resp'Onse to ti!'. . v. ; Comnmnications or donatioi!> . 

ad'.b ossed, simolv ; — 

*' HISTORIC riY," 

St. Paul. 



l-T;^'' All persons V. I;... v ;:.,: , . . ... \ (.a. <,i.:r 

!i>t , and reeieve the PMbJications of the i5oeiely in return. 



ANNUAL REPORT 

OF TUH 

Minnesota Historical Society 

TO TUfi 

LEGISLATURE OF MINNESOTA, 
FOR THE l^AR 1869. 




Read and adopted at the Annual Meeting of the Society^ 
yanuary lo, 1S70. 



SAINT PAUL: 
PRESS PRINTING COMPANY. 
1870. 



OFFICEllS Foil 1870 



REV. JOHN MATTOCKS. 

VICE TRESIDKNTS. 

1. JUDGE A. OOODKICII, 

2. HON. E. E. JDKAKE, 
S. J. P. POND. 

SECRETARY, 

J. rLETCHEE WILLIAMS. 

TREASURER. 

ALEEED J. HILL. 

EXECUTIVE COUNCIL. 



PRESIDENT. 



G. A. Hamilton, 
Rev. John Mnttocks, 
Capt. R. P.lal^cley, 
Rev. Dr. Brown, 
J. B. Cbjiney, 
Hon. E. F. Drake, 
A. J. Hill, 
James J. Hill, 
Rev. J. Ireland, 
William H. Kclley, 
Ex-Governor Marshall, 
Dr. B. Mattocks, 
Gen. H. H. Sibley, 



Charles E. Mayo, 
Rev. Dr. McMasters, 
J. P. Pond, 
Dr. R. 0. Sweeny, 
J. F. Williams, 
James W. Taylor, 
Dr. J. B. Phillips, 
Col. John L. Merriam, 
Dr. A. Falkenshiold, 
Judge A. Goodrich, 
Jud2:e Jno. M. Berry, 
Dr. T. D. Simonton. 



REPORT OF THE EXECUTIVE COUNCIL. 



At the close of twenty years of its corpw^atc exi^l( ;ice, 
the Society ineets this evening under auspices more favorable 
than have ever surrounded it on a similar occasion. Its op- 
erations the past year have been crowned with a larger 
degree of .success than we seemed warranted in hoping for 
at our last annual nieetins:. The action of the Lci^islature 
of 18G9, in placing at our disposal more enlarged means than 
we had received prior to that time, has produced the most 
gratifying results in the increased usefulness and prosperity 
of the Society, and resulted m placing it on a basis where 
its futuj-e success is ensured. Indeed, the year just closed 
may be said to be the first one of our career so fiu*, in which, 
having secured the desiderata of good rooms, suflicient 
means, and the services of a Librarian to attend to the busi- 
ness of the Society, we have been able to properly perform 
the work for which the Society was organized. 

THE LIBRARY. 

The rapid increase of the Library, is one of the most 
encouraging features of the success noted above. During 
the year 1861), the accessions to it were as follows : 

Bound Volumes, 801; Pamphlets, 2,090; Maps and 
Pictures, 55; MSS., 24 ; Files of Papers, 52; Curiosities, 
etc., 68 ; Coins, 31 ; making a total of 3,181 dilfcrent articles 
added to our collection during the year. 

The sources from wlience the bound volumes were received 
arc : 

P\'om Donations, 65U ; from Purchase, 100; from Bind- 
ing, 47 ; from Exchange, 55. 



4 



A2y^'UAL KKPOKT OF THE 



The relative increase of the Librar}' since the reorgauiza 
lion of the Society in 18(54, hns ])Gen as follows : 



No. Reported la 


Bookii. 


Pamphletfl. 


Total lu Library. 


X t) l-> t: J 


826 


1,236 


2,002 


i8Gr,, 


- 958 


1,286 


2,224 


1867, - 


- ' 1,037 


1,37S 


2,415 


18G8, 


- 1,155 


2J36 


3,291 


1869, - 


2,330 


3,632 


5,962 


1870, 


-3,191 


5,72-2 


8,913 



FKIXCIPAl. PURCHASES. 



The purchases for our Libiary the past year amount to 
over one hundred volumes, &t^cnrcd at a cost of about $420. 
This amount would have been larprely increased, had not un- 
expected expenses which it became necessary to provide for, 
considerably cut down our original estim^'tes. The pur- 
chases have been made in the most systematic and careful 
manner. We have endeavored to secure : first, books 
relating to Minnesota ; second, to the history ;iud topography 
of the Northwest and AVcst ; and lastly, general American 
history, especially the more old and rare works, which are 
becoming more scarce and valuable every year. Arrange- 
ments were made by which we receive regularly the cata- 
logues of all principal dealers in rare works, and those out 
of print," not only in this country, but in England and Ger- 
many. AVe thus secure our choice from the principal book 
marts of the world. These are carefully searched by our 
committee, the libri desiderati noted, and our orders made 
up after careful study. Our Library Committee is composed 
of gentlemen of extensive bibliographical experience, and 
^^e point to the results of their labors the past year with no 
small satisfaction, regretting only the somewhat limited 
means we were able to place at their disposal. 

Among the principal works purchased are : a complete 
set of the New England Historical and Genealogical Kegis- 
ter, 20 volumes; Dean's History of Civilization, 7 volumes; 
Historical Collection^ of Louisiana, 5 volumes; Lewis and 
Clarke's Travels, 3 do ; Kalm's Travels, 3 do ; Peter Force's 



MIXXESOTA IIISTOKICAL SOCIETY. 



5 



Historical Tracts, 4 do; three volmnes of Schoolcraft's 
works (completing our set of his writings) ; Feather.^ton- 
haiigh's " Canoe Voyage up the INTinnay Sotor," 2 volumes; 
La llontan's work (edition of 1735) ; Sabin's Bibliotlieca 
Americana, 15 parts;. I inlay's Topography ; Henry's Travels 
in North America ; Tanner's Narrative of Captivity; " Ro- 
raance of Indian Life," and "Dakota Legends," the 
two works written by Mrs. Mary Eastman while residing at 
Fort Suelling; Atwater's Tour; Francis Parkman's three 
works, Jesuits of North America," Pioneers of Franco 
in the New A\'orld," and " Discovery of the Great "West"; 
Ross's *'licd Kiver Settlement;" AVcst'.- work on t!ie same 
subject, and Simpson's Discoveries on the North Coast of 
America ; Lanman's Canoe Voyage in the Wilderness," etc. 
A few of the elegant reprints, by W. P. Lunt, of Boston, 
of rare work< on New England history, and some local his- 
tories, have also been purchased. 

DONATIONS. 

The donations the past year have fir exceeded, in number 
and value, those of any previous year. 

The principal one is the gitt by Lord Romilly, " Master of 
the Rolls" of England, of 217 volumes of the publications 
ot the Rolls Oilico, containing the most important and inter- 
esting historical MSS. in the archives ot Great Britain. Tliis 
desii-able gift, obtained through the friendly aid of His Ex- 
cellency, J. L'»throp Motley, our .Minister at the Court of 
Saint James, is the largest and most valuable one which the 
Societ}" has yet received at one time. Quite a proportion of 
the books arc folios and quartos, and nearly all contain fac- 
similes of the original A[SS. from which the i)rinted text was 
copied, with translations and notes by eminent scholars. 
Latin, Norman, Anglo-Saxon, \Velch, Gaelic and Irish 
Chronicles and State [)apers all appear here, and there is 
scarce a volume which is not of the highest historical value. 
But few sets ot these works iirc to be found in the public 
libraries of America. Mr. .Motley, in his letter amiouncing 
the donation, says : "I congratulate the Society on this 



6 



AKNTJAI. EKPOKT OF THE 



valuable contribution to its Lii)raiy, many of the works be- 
ing already rare, and all ot tiicin important." Tha Society 
must ever feel grateful to ]Mr. Motley for bis good offices in 
securing, and to Lord Rouiilly for his generosity in making, 
this very valuable and much appreciated gilt to our 
Librar\ . 

A fitting companion to the above valuable set of archives, 
is the gilt by Gen. Henry S. Sanlord, an Honorary Member 
of this Society, of a copy of the recently published fac simile 
of the *'Don)esday Book" of William the Conqueror, in 
two volumes. The hi.storic interest attached to this, the 
oldest manuscript in the Archives of England, as well as its 
intrinsic value (having cost the donor about $140 j, must 
cause it to be always highly prized. Nor will it be regarded 
here with any less antiquarian interest than by the English 
themselves, nor examined for ancestral names with less 
success, when it is remembered how large a proportion of 
our people are tracing their genealogies back through cen- 
turies of English history. A public library must be collected 
in a cosuKjpolitan spirit. In the world of literature, there 
are no distinctions of nationality. AYhile we are neces- 
sarily much restricted to the collection of American history, 
we do not design to forget how intimately it is connected 
with that of a land which is undeniably, in more than one 
sense, our ** mother country." 

Dr. Samuel A. Green, of Boston, has been the donor, 
during the year, of 50 bound volumes and nearly 1,000 
pamphlets; Dr. Edward Jarvis, President of the American 
Statistical xVssociation, contributed (J volumes and 100 i)aui- 
phlels on statistical subjects. Eroni the estate of Dr. Geo. 
W. Eahnestock we have received 12 volumes, laid aside by 
him prior to his death. Daniel S. Durrie, F^sq., of Madison, 
AVis. , contributes 4 bound volumes and 27 unbound volumes 
relating to that State. Robert Clarke, of Cincinnati, sends 
4 of his valuable ** Ohio Valley Historical Series"; and 
Joel Munsell, of Albany, two books anrl 34 pampliK'ts from 
bis press. Dr. Pruyn, of Albany; licv. Dr. Vinton and 
"Wm. S. Appleton, of Boston ; Rev. Djrus CI irke, r>onson 
J. Li'ssi:ig, the eminent historian, and others, have contrib- 



' MINNESOTA IIISTOUICAL SOCIETY. 



7 



utcd valuable historical works. Among the other contribu- 
tions from our own citizen^ vro may note : three rare old 
works from Judge A. Goodrich (one printed in 14'J2) ; 
from Ivev. John Mattocks, 9 va]ual)le volumes of " Revolu- 
tionary" newspapers, and several un!)ound files; from Geo. 
A. Hamilton, 28 volumes ; Edward Sawyer, 33 volumes ; 
• J. F. Williams, 20 do ; Dr. R. O. Sweeny, 10 : etc., etc. 

From the State of Massachu setts we have received 29 vol- 
umes ; from the Regents ot the State Univer&ity of Xew 
York, 15 volumes; from the Department of the Interior, 33 
volumes; from the Quartermaster General of U. S. A., 15 
volumes; and from the Adjutant General of llliuois, 8 vol- 
umes. We are also indebted to Senator Ramsey and Hon. 
E. M. Wilson, for sundry pul^^ic documents. In all, over 
150 difierent persons and institutions have contributed gifts 
•duiing the past year. 

FROM OTHER SOCIETIES. 

From our sister societies we have received favors which 
we gratefull}^ acknowledge. The Historical Societies of 
Massachusetts, Xew Jersey, Pennsylvania, Georgia, Ohio, 
Wisconsin, Iowa and Chicago, and the Essex and Peabody 
Institutes, the Boston Public Library, and others, have all 
laid us under obligations for their publications, in whole or in 
part. Our system of exchanges has been greatly extended 
the pabtyear, and now includes several European societies, 
whose publications are regularly received. 

NEWSPAPERS. 

The most gratilying success has rewarded the special ef- 
forts put forth by the Librarian to })crfect our liles of early 
Minnesota newspapers. During the past year, the mas.-^ of 
unbound papers which had been accumulatiug for several 
years, was carefully assoited into volumes, and such as wero 
perfect were sent to the binder. Unremitting eflbrta were 
also made to perfect the inc()m[»lete liles. Circulars were 
widel}' distributed, asking for donations of old copies — even 



8 ' ANNUAL KEPORT OF THE 

of a single number. From small lots received from time to 
time, we are rapiilly compl^ tin^ our earlier volumes, and 
will soon have au unrivaled collection of our State news- 
papers. 

Since our last annual report, we have received by gift, 
exchange and purchase, 46 unbound volumes of Minnesota 
papers, 21 of which have been com[)leted sufficient to bind. 
The principal donation to this Jjpartmeut during 18G9, was 
by Rev. Jno. ^Nhxttocks. It consists of 7 bound volumes of 
papers published during the Revolutionary War, and a few 
years subsequent, with several unbound files covering the 
period from 1780 to 1816, the whole forming a very valua- 
ble gift. G. W. Farrington has coiitril)uted 3 bound volumes, 
and Gen. Sibley 1, of earij .".linnesota papers, and J. D. 
Lnddcn, 5, unbound. 

We are now receivicg and carefully preserving nearly 60 
newspapers of our State, generously contributed by the pub- 
lishers. Whenever sufficient for a volume accumulates, they 
are bound up, and thus in a short time, our newspaper col- 
lection will be one of the most valuable sections of our Libra- 
ry. By no other institution m the State is such care taken 
to collect and preserve these most valuable records for histo- 
ry ; nor, at this day, can an}' collection at all rivaling ours 
in conipletcness be amassed, even with unlimited means. 

Some progress has also been made in binding our news- 
papers, partly through the generosity of an Honorary 
Member of the Society, Henry B. Dawson, Esq., publish- 
er of the Historical Magazine, who oflered that if ten mem- 
bers would subscribe to that work, at $5 each, he Avould 
donate the whole amount to the Society as a fund to aiel in 
binding. The amount was secured, and the money applied 
to the piu'pose indicated. This is the tirst gift of money 
which has been received for a special purpose, and it is to 
be hoped it may be the tore-runner of many generous dona- 
tions. 

PAMPHLETS. 

Our Pamphlet collection has received large and valuable- 



MINXESOTA TirSTOIirCAL SOCIETY. 



additions the past year. In all, 2,000 have been received, 
makini; our whole iiunihor 5.722. The lar<^est accession 
was the gift of Dr. Samuel A. Green, of Boston, numbering 
985 documents, mimy of them old, rare, and of great value. 
From Geo. A. Hamilton we liave received 127 ; from J. F. 
Willitims, 02 ; Chicago Historical Society, 108 ; Dr. Edward 
Jarvis, 107 ; Gov. .Marshall, 22 ; Judge 11. F. Crowell, ; 
D. S. Durrie, 27; Joel >r!in- -M, 31; IrvmgTodd, 51, &c. 

During the year our pamphlets have been carefully classi- 
fied into divisions by subject, and arranged into volumes of 
suiiable size, with a durable wrapper, and carefully labelled, 
so that a i)amphlct on any subject contained in the collection 
can be readily found. 

MAPS AND ATLASES. 

Our collection of Maps, Charts and Atlases, has also receiv- 
ed important accessions during the year, 38 in all having been 
added, some of them curious and interesting. Provision 
should be made soon for the bindins: of some of them into 
volumes, or properly mounting them. The principal gifts 
this year have been, G. W. Fahnestock, 10; R.Blanchard, 
Chicago, 5 ; Silas Chapman, Mihvaukee, 6 ; J. F. Williams, 
7; Kev. J. Mattocks, 1 map and 1 atlas, both rare; ^Vm. 
H. Chase, 1, Oic. 

MANUSCRIPTS. 

^A considerable nun^ber of MSS., valuable for hi^-torical 
pur})0.-es and as antiquarian curiosities, have been secured 
the past year. Louis F. Fisher, Esq., presents a MS. of 
one of Edward Everett's State papers, neatly bound. From 
Capt. Thos. 11. Pressnell, of the First Regiment, a Rebel 
Orderly Book, cai)tur( d on the Peninsula ; and from Mrs. 
C. ]v. Davis, a similar memento of the late strife, secured in 
Arkansas. (). IWown, of Mankato, gives ns the Pay Roll 
of a Texas Cavalry Company. I. N. Cardozo contii))utes 
the recor<l book of Hk; ''Pioneer Guard," the first volunteer 
militarv com[)ariy in the St;ite, splendidly emblazoned ; and 
2 • 



10 



ANNUAL RErOirr OF THE 



from members of **II()pe Engine Conipuny Xo. 1," the first 
fire engine Ci>m[)any forincel \u Miniiesotii, we have reeeived 
the old record l)ooks of that association. Capt. J. K. Ar- 
nold contributes the original order tor the execution (jf the 
thirty-eight Indians at Mankato. Dr. Simonton, H. L. 
Moss, and others, old legal documents of last century. From 
Lieut. Albert Lea. (an early explorer of Minnesota,) Rev. 
S. 11. Kiggs, S. M. Thomp-on, J. W. Furber, and others, 
we have received MSS. relating to Minnesota history : and 
from O. E. Garrison, of St. Cloud, a ]\Iemoir of the Geog- 
raphy and Topography of Stearns County. 

1 

THE CABINET. 

Some accessions of interest have also been made to the 
Cabinet during the year just closed. Among the "histo] ical'* 
relics and curiosities received, is a bayonet used at the Battle 
of Lexington, by the grandfatlier of J. B. Chancy, of our 
Society, from whom we received it ; the rope on which 
Chaska, one of the thirty-dght Indian murderers was hung, 
presented by Capt. Arnold ; the ballots used in the first 
Electoral College of Minnesota, in 1860, by J. C. :^rcClure, 
of Red Wing; a ticket to the Impeachment Trial of A. 
Johnson, from Senator Eamsey, &c., &c. Very fine stone 
implements and pottery of the "Mound Builders" have also 
been received from several citizens. (See "Archaeology.") 
Rev. G. H. Pond contributes some singular "medicine" 
relics of the Dakotahs. Bvt. Col. Alexander Chamber-^, U. 
S. A., donates a bone of a Mastodon Glganleus, a huge 
specimen, indicating by comparative anatomy, that the 
animal must have Ixhmi fiReen feet in height ! For the com- 
fort of our Eastern friends designing to settle in this State, 
however, we remark that these animals do not now exist in 
Minnesota. * 

Gov. Marshall has also presented the head of an enormous 
bison, killed by himself and other gentlemen in Dakota last 
July, prei)ared in a very lifelike and artistic manner, cuu- 
stituting one of the main curiosities of our rooms. (lov. M. 
also contributed the body of a Lynx^ killed a few weeks 



MINNESOTA IIISTOIilCAL SOCITKY. 



11 



since near this city, the last relic, probably, of the " bow- 
ling " wilderness which but a shoi l time ago j?in rouiuled the 
fiite of the very building in which we arc now assembled. 
We have had this animal pi'cpared in a very lile-like manner. 
A collection of minerals, 28 in number, has been received from 
Judge Crowell, and coins from T. II. Pressnell, J. B. 
Chancy, J. P. Pond, Geo. A. DuToit, F. A. Von Tagen, 
and others. Continental and Coi^foderate Currency from A. 
Moore, W. II. Caine, Sam'l. Sloan, of N. Y. ; and C. Hunt- 
ington. Old papers and documents from J. AV. Prince, E. 
D. iSeill, Chas. Mclntyre, O. Brown, and others. 

MSS. FOR PUBLICATION. . * 

Unremitting eflorts have been made to discover and pro- 
cure original manuscripts touching on the early history of 
Minnesota, with a view to their publication by the Society. 
During the present year, several of much interest and value 
have thus been secured. The discovery, in France, of the 
MS. of Penicaud, one of the ])arty of Lc Sueur who spent 
the winter of 1700-1 in a stockade at the mouth of the Blue 
Earth Kiver, and its purchase (nt the instigation of Pev. E. 
D. Neill) by the Library of Congress, was the means of our 
securing much additional light on the early French Forts in 
Minnesota. A copy was secured of all that portion con- 
cerning this region, which bus been carefully translated by 
a member of the Societ}^, and furnished with a copious pre- 
face by Mr. Neill. We have also secured from Mrs. Van 
Cleve, Ptcv. S. P. Piggs K. D. Neill, and others, valuable 
papeis on ^Minnesota history, and have been promised by 
Lieut. Albert M. Lea, who traversed a portion of the State 
in 1835, a valuable MS. memoir on the region as it then ap- 
pealed, written at the tinie by him. One ot the main objects 
of this Society is to publish memoirs of this nature, but at 
present we are totally without means to do so. AVe press 
this subject to the attention of the Legislature, and ask that 
the Society be authorized to have printed by the State 
Printer, a pamphlet of about 150 pages, to contain the 
manuscript materials for history now on hand. 



12 



ANXUAL 1;KP0RT OF THE 
TIOOMS LIB1:ARY work, ETC. 



The very pleasant rooms provided for our use in the State 
^Capitol a few months ago, liave proved a great aid to our 
success. Since April 1 , they have been constantl}' o[)en, and 
oiir Librarian has been in Jittendance during the usual busi- 
ness hours about the Capitol. Several thousand visitors have 
been received since that time, the Liljrary catalogued, 
arranged, and put in order, the pamphlets arranged in vol- 
umes, and our large collection of newspapers assorted and 
prepared for binding. Over 5v.O letters on business ot the 
Society have liecn written, and aid given to a large number 
of persons seeking statistical or historical information in our 
Library. Already our rooms are becoming crowded, and 
Diore space would be desirable now. If our Library in- 
creases much moix', it will be imperatively necessary. 

FINANCES. 

With great care and judicious management, the appropri- 
ation granted by the last Legislature has been made to meet 
all our expenses, and our success is an evidence that the 
trust has been well administered. Investigation into our 
expenditures is desired, that we may show how carefully 
and creditably we have used our means, with an e3'e to the 
best and most tavorable results. 

V 

ARCHEOLOGY. 

During the past year, the Committee on Arrlueology have 
assiduously continued the collection of diagrams and surveys 
showing the location and position of mounds and other earth- 
works in the State, and desii^n continuing this portion of 
their labors until every group of tumuli is noted ami map- 
ped. For want of means none have been opened or exam- 
ined by the committee the past year, but we are greatly in- 
debted to several gentlemen who have done so at their own 
expense, and communicated to u^^ a careful re[)ort of the re- 
sult. Especially would we mention in this connection Dr. 



MINNESOTA 11 ISTOKICAL SOCIETY. 



13 



A. I. CoQifoit, U. S. A., of Fort Wadswoith, (uow atForl 
Randall), \vlio examined a number of mouiid-s, and scht us 
the result of hi^ careful investigations, besides contributinir 
^ a fine collection of aboriginal pottery, to be distributed to 
other societies. We must also return acknowledgments to 
Dr. A. ]5arnai d, of Leech Lake, Geo. C. Lynch, J. P. Cot- 
ton, and C. M. Boyle, of St. Paul ; Messrs. Jcwettc^ Howe, 
Deputy U. S. Surveyors, Nathan Butler, and others, for 
survey s made and other valuable aid. We have also secur- 
ed fine specimens of stone axes and other implements from 
Hon. B. D. Spiague, of Rushford, E. Berreau, Capt. A. \V. 
White, and others. Altogether, the resnlts of the year's 
labors in this direction have been very encouraging. This' 
Society is now almost the only cne in the west which is giv- 
ing any syj^tematic attention to the collection of data on the 
above subject, and ere long it must place us in possession of 
a large mass of valuable information. 

NEED OF ENDOWMENTS. 

While the liberal grant of the State aid has been the 
means of giving us an enlarged snccess, and for the present 
is almost our sole means of accomplishing anything, wc 
must not neglect every proper effort to secure an endowment 
for our Society commensurate with its wants. A systematic 
effort, if need be, contem})lating years of jmi'cmitting atten- 
tion, should be commenced and ])ersistently kept up, to se- 
cure it. Its accom})lishment has been hoi)ed f jr by some, 
from the liberality of wealthy eastern gentlemen, but this 
should not be relied on. Scarcely once in a generation do 
M'cstern institutions receive such a gift, while so many east- 
ern competitors importunately stand between them and the 
source ol bounty. B e juust look lo our own cilhcns tor the 
endowment wc should have. The rapid increase of wealth 
in our State the past five or six years, indicates tiifit the 
reliance will not [)rove unavailing, if our citizens, who are 
able, will but perform their part. Lidced, among our own 
membershii) we should be able to secure a considerable 
endowment. Suppose that each of our members provides 



AXNTUAL P.KPOIIT OF THE 



for a bequest to the Si)cioty, of a sum aniountiug to an aver- 
ago of $200 each — certainly a low averaL'e. In the course 
of another generation this wouhl ho realized hy the Sociity, 
thus securing tor it the hand>onic sum of $30,000, the in- 
come of which would very nearly su[)port it. And there are 
hundreds of men of means in our community, not members 
of our Society, yet who should also esteem it a privilege to 
provide ])y k'gacy, for the gifl -fa portion of their means in 
the endowment of an institution like this, which with means, 
can accomplish a work for succoedinir generations which ihe 
latter must gratefully appreciate. How r)etter than this can 
any one leave a monument to his memory, " more cndiiring 
than brass ?" 

It is wisdom on our part, tv.o, to bear constantly in cr.iia 
that in a very few years we must provide a building f^^r our 
Library, ample in its dimensions, and perfectly fire proof. 
For the present we are well enough provided in this resp> : ot, 
but are rapidly approaching a time when these apartmci^is, 
or, indeed, an\- apartments wliich can be provided for us in 
the Capitol (unless it should be enlarged) will be wholly 
unsuitable. We must, therefore, sooner or later, have a 
building of our own, for the permanent deposit of our treas- 
ures of history, art and literature, for all time to come. 

OUR LIBKAKY ITS VALUE. 

To provide this seems a duty which we owe to the public. 
\Vc are gratified in believing that our Library must always 
be the most valuable in the State, and will very soon bocume 
the largest. The very perlect system for its increase wliioh 
we have adopted, and the wise regulations for its manage- 
ment, justify this prediction, as they cannot fail to comnurjd 
the conlidence of all, making us ihe reci[)ient in future of 
large and valuable gills from appreciative tViends and patrons 
of such Societies. 

Indeed, already our Library has some departments worthy 
of mention for their development. Our collection of nev. s- 
papers has been before mentioned. Our Minnesota alcove 
contains now almost every work that directly or remotely 



MnrXESOTA illSTOUICAL SOCIETY. 



15 



bears on that subject. Our collection of publications of 
historical and learned Societi M'itli a liltle more eOort, 
can be made complete. Of western history \vc have an al- 
cove that rewards the outlay of trouble and means in its 
collection, by the array of rare and valuable works on that 
subject. 01 ]^ritish and American Archives and State 
Papers, particuhirly the former, we have several hundred 
volumes, all of histoiical iiitcrc.^1, and some dillicult to ob- 
tain. Our Genealogical collection (and which en passant^ 
we might remark has been more studied than almost any 
othei") is ra[)idly assuming importance. In Ccdonial Records 
and Archives of various States, and State Scieuiific and Sta- 
tistical publications, we have so far progressed that we can 
reasonabl3- hope soon to compieie our collection. In Bibli- 
ography, an invabiable adjunct of every Library, we have 
made some })rogress. While in New England history, in 
works on our Indian races, in Mngazinos and Serials, and 
early travels and explorations in America, we have reason 
to feel encouraged at our accumulations. 

In one department, on the contrary, we are yet quite 
deficient. We refer to works on Slavery and the Rebellion. 
As yet we have onl}- a few, out of the hundreds which have 
been publislied on that subject. Some special eflort should 
be made by our meuibers to collect works or i)am[)hlets on 
this sui)jcet, as they must always be largely enquired after. 
A considcralde proportion of every public or private Library 
hereafter formed, must consist of woi'ks bearing on this 
grandest, most interesting and eventlul portion of American 
History. 

CONCLUSION. 

i 

Allusion was made, in opening, to the fact that the Society 
has now com[)leted twenty } ears of its existence. Orgariized 
when the " elements of empire " here were rude and chaotic, 
the po[)uIation small, and the community poor, its early 
progress was slow and unpromising. Indeed, when reor- 
ganized in 18G1, from which time we ought to date our rea 
existence, it had but 8v00 volumes in the Library, and those 



10 



ANA UAL K}:P0HT. 



of minor value. Now we look around witli gratification on 
our well-rilled shelves, containing nearly 3,2U0 carefully- 
selected volumes, and to the succe.sstul o[)erations of the 
Society the past 3'ear. Still restricted by want of means in 
our movements, we are encouraged as we look back with 
mmgled pride and gratitude over the past, and see what we 
have accomplished ^\ ith patient labor and hopefulness. Let 
us now feel assured that our S > :iety, havii]g passed its in- 
fancy, is prepared with a strength and maturity of organiza- 
tion to advance at still more rapid i)ace to the position of 
usefulness and influence to which its objects and aims entitle it. 
The experience of the past gives us additional confidence in 
hoping that onr future may deserve, even more liberally 
than it has yet received, the support and encouragement of 
the public, and that we may soon rival similar institutions in 
the older States and more wealthy c(>mmunities of the.East. 



St. Paul, Jan. 10, 1870. 



ANNUAL REPORT 



OF THE 

Minnesota Historical Society, 

TO TltE 

LEGISLATURE OF MINNESOTA, 
FOR THE YEAR 1S70. 




Read a)id adopted at the A7i?!ual Meeting of the Society^ 
yanuary 9. 1.^71 . 



S A I N T F A U L : 

PRESS P I N TING C O M F A N Y. 
1S7I. 



/ 



OFFICE nS FO R 1871 



PRESIDKNT : 

CAPT. RUSSELL BLAKELEY. 

VICE PRr.HlDKNTS : 

1. GEN. HENRY IL SIBLEY, 

2. REV. F. T. BROWN, D, D. 

3. ROBERT O. SWEEXY. 

SECRET A IIY : 

J. FLETCHER WILLTA^^S. 

TREASUKEU : 

ALFRED J. HILL. 



EXECUTIVE COUNCIL: 



George A. Hamilton, 
Rev. John ^lattocks, 
Capt. R. I^lnkcley, 
Rev. F. T. Brown, D. D. 
J. B. Chancy, 
Hon. E. F. Drake. 
A. J. Hill. 
James J. Hill, 
Rev. John IreLand, 
Win. II. Kellcy, 
Ex-Gov. W. ]{. Marshall, 
Dr. Brewer Mattocks, 
Gen. H. H. Sibley, 



Charles E. Mayo, 
Rev. S. Y. McMasters, D. 
J. P. Pond, 
R. O. Sweeny, 
J. F. Williams, 
James W. Taylor, 
Col. John L. Mcrriam, 
Dr. A. Falkenshield, 
Judg:e xV. Goodrich. 
Judge John M. Berry, 
Dr. J. B. Phillips, 
Dr. T. D. Siinonton. 



REPORT OF THE EXECUTIVE CO UNCI L. 



In presenting the annual report uf the Society's operations 
and pr«»grcss lor tho year 1870, the Executive C(»uncil Ii:ive 
a very j)leasant duty to perform. The continued success of 
the Societ}^ in accomplishing the objects of its organization, 
are certainly gratifying to its members, and satisfactory to 
the citizens of the .State. Commencing its work in the ruder 
days of our Territory, then a frontier region almost without 
population, it lias kept pace with the progress and success 
of the commonwealth ; sharing, too, its reverses and seasons 
of despondency, yet never yielding its ground, until now it 
has become one of our n)ost respected public institutions — 
one that has an)ply demonstrated its u^sefuiuess, and repaid 
the confidence and jnitronage of the public. 

I he past year has been especially marked as one of real 
progress in our work. Our Libraiy has increased, not only 
in the number of its accessions, but what is better, in their 
vjilue and usefulness. Our list of" correspondents and donors 
has also been greatly enlaiged and extended, and our system 
of exchanges made to yield inci'easing fruits. 'J'he ])u))lica- 
lion of another Pait of our Collections, has greatly aided 
us in this re>pect, and introduced us to the notice of many 
of the best histcrical scholars in our country. In ^horL, our 
Society, amid the discouragements of the i>ast, has now at- 
tained a rank in whicli it can rival successfully muny similar 
institutions in older States, and is helping to introduce the 
name of oVJinnesota a))road, and sustain tho asserted intelli- 
gence and liberality of our people. 



ANIS-UAL REPOIIT. 



THE LlliKAIiY. 

Many accessions of value and interest have been made to 
our Library since our last report, and its continued rapid 
growth is a matter of pride to its managers. During the 
year 1870, tiiere were received as follows : Bound vol- 
umes, 826; Pamphlets, 1,633: MSS., 16; Photographic 
portraits and views, 9 ; Engravings, 17 ; Curiosities, 89 ; 
Maps, 25; liles of papers, 74; making a total of 2,693 
articles added to our collection during the year. 

The sources from whence the bound volumes were receiv- 
ed are ; from donations, 347 ; from, exchange, 342 ; from 
purchase, 106; from binding, 31. 

The following table exhibits the increase of the Library 
for several years past : 



No. report- Total in 

ed iu Books. Pamphlets. Library. 

18C4 : 82G 1,230 2,0G2 

18G0 958 1,286 2,22-t 

18G7 1,037 1,378 2,415 

1868 1,155 2,136 3,291 

1869 2,330 3,632 5,962 

1870 3,191 5,722 8,913 

1871 4,017 7,301 11,318 



PURCHASES. 

The very limited sum which the Council was able to place 
at the disposal of the Library Committee, the gentlemen com- 
posing that Committee have laid out to the best advantage. 
Our endeavor has been to secure principally the woi'ks relat- 
ing to the Xorthv.'cst, and Valley of the Mississippi — espec- 
ially the older and rarer works, which are becoming scarcer 
every year, and are even now dillicult to ol)tain. Among 
the accessions to this class we may mention, Letlres Edifian- 
tes el Oxtrictises, (1780) 26 vols ; Voyiuje da Baron la Hon- 
^au, Amsterdam, 1705; Tanner's Xarrattve of Indian Cap- 
tivity; Burke's European Settlements; Foster's yorthern 
Voyages; Voyage a la Louisiane, by — D — . [Sabin says, 
** Baudry Des Lozicrs."j ; \\'ynne's /Jritish Emjyire ; Moll's 
do; Sagard's Grand Voyage dn Pays des llurons; Iielat-.ons 



MINNESOTA HISTOIilCAL SOCIETY. 



de la Louisiane, &q. Several v;i!ruiblc works ou the Hudsou 
Bay region have also been secured, — Ross's Red River Set- 
tlemeni; Statement resjjecting Red River Settlement ; Robson's 
Six Years Residence in Hudson's Bay, Howse'sCree Gram- 
mar; Milton and Cheadle's 2^. W, Passage; Martin's Hud- 
son Bay Territories^ &c., being of this class, which we de- 
sign to continue until complete. 

Several rare old atlases of America have also been secured, 
and a few works on Bibliography, making our collection on 
that subject quite good. A few volumes of early travels and 
explorations in the Northwest have also been purchased, and 
some of the early French voyages to Louisiana. 

In all, 106 volumes havC been purchased, at an average 
cost of $1.67, a low average, in fact, considering the rarity 
and high price of some of the works. The total amount ex- 
pended for books, and subscriptions to periodicals and book 
clubs, was $237.11, — scarcely a fifth of the sum we should 
have had for this purpose. 

DONATIONS. 

Many of the gifts of the past year are valuable and inter- 
esting, and while no one donation, perhaps, is as large and 
valuable as some mentioned in our last reiiort, the a^^^-reL'^ate 
number of donors far exceeds that of 1869, while many of 
the gifts are desirable and choice. We have space, howev- 
er, to note only a few ot the most important. 

Dr. Samuel A. Green, our valual)le Corresponding ]\Icm- 
bcr at Boston, whoso large gifts of last year were noted 
then, again heads the li.'^t, his generous hand having con- 
tributed 'I'o bound volumes and ^64 pamphlets, chiefly on 
American history. Senator Ramsey contributes 43 bound 
and 117 unbound volumes, mostly choice public documents, 
among them the Tribute of Nations to Abraham Lincoln,'' 
and G vols, of the valuable and elaborate reports of the Paris 
Ex})ositiun. Hon. J. J. Knox, of the Currency Bureau, 
has secured for us vols, ot ihe more valuable statistical re- 
l)orts of Congress, and from the Dej)t. of the Interior we 
have received 47 volumes ol Conirressional Documents. All 



6 



AXNUAL liEPOKT. 



the foregoing enrich a tlepai t'^iont of Amorican arcliivul his- 
tory and stati^-tics which every pul)lia library niu>t iiave, and 
all arc desirous of renderini^ eoniplete. Our own collecli"ii 
is. becoming ini[)ortant, and is frequently eoubulted. Hon. 
William Locliren, of Minneapolis, contributes 23 volumes 
of the ^Missionary Herald, and Jiev. E. 1). Xeill, now ra 
Dublin, Ireland, 3 vols, of t^: Annals of Faith, all contain- 
ing numerous letters and reports of early Protestant and 
Catholic missionaries to what is now Minnesota — iniportar.t 
materials for our State Jlistor)^. The Q lartermaster Gen'l 
of the U. S. Army sends 4 Jvolls of Honor," com[)leting 
the full set of 25 volumes — a sad roll indeed, containing the 
names of literally hundreds u[ iLousands of the martyrs to 
liberty who perished in the hite strife, and whose remaiiiS 
now rest m our national cemeteries. Koberl Clarke, of Cin- 
cinnati, contributes 5 volumes, being the continuation of his 
very valuable " Ohio Valley Historical Series/' Dr. F. B. 
Hough, the eminent statistician .)f New York, a valuable col- 
lection of documents on &i;itistics and social science, and 
Wm. S. Appleton, of Boston, another of his splendid pri- 
vately printed genealogical works. The Seabury Mission 
Library of our own State sends in exchange 41 volumes, 
mostly theological. Other considerable donors are: A. J. 
Hill, 22 volumes; Charles A. Cutter, of Boston, 12; J. F. 
Williams, 12; ^^'m. H. Giant, 11 ; Andrew Boyd, Aibany, 
N. Y., 10. The j)rincipal gifts of pam})hlels are mentioned 
under that head. Gen. C. C, Andrews, our Minister to 
Stockholm, also sends a gill ol much interest, being a nearly 
complete set of specimens of Ne\vs[)apers of Sweden ai:d 
Norway, bound in two volumes — a fine collection of journai- 
istic literature ol a countrv that is contributing: so much ol 
the human sea" now llov^ing into our own State. One of 
these papers, the I'^uuifnarks Vos/jm, is the most northerly 
paper i)rinted in the world ! It is published at Hamuierfest, 
in Norway, the iartlu^t rioili)crn settleniciit in Europe, on 
the shore of the Arctic Ocean, — a point, indeed, so near the 
north pole, that the *' midnight sun.," graphically described 
by travellers theie, is a common feature of the latitude. 
A more lull list of donors accompanies thi.> report, and in 



MINNESOTA HISTORICAL SOCIETT. 



7 



referring to it, the Society returns, in general and in par- 
ticular, its warmest thanks for tlie interest manifested by 
the donors. 

PAMPHLETS. 

In unbound volumes and pamphlets we have made rapid 
progress, 1633 being added to lliat section of our library, 
many of them . interesting and valuable. Our total number 
number now is 7301. A part of these are ready for bind- 
ing, and all, with the exception of a few received very late- 
ly, arranged in tcmpoi-ary volumes. Dr. Sanuiel A. Green, 
of Boston, is the ])rincipal donor this year, having sent us 
864. Senator ]^amse3^ and the j:..-?fccx (Mass.) Institute each 
■contribute 117. Addison Van Name, Esq., Librarian of 
Yale College, has sent us 75 pamphlets, catalogues, address - 
cs, reports, Slc, of that institution, making quite a complete 
history of the same for about half a century Dast. Other 
principal contributors are, Joel Munsell, 36 ; Dr. F. B. 
Hough, '22; Prof. \V. F. Piielps, 50; Gov. H. Austin, 20; 
Hon. R. C. Winthrop, of Boston, 18; Irving Todd, 21; D. 
S. Durrie, 16, &c. We again solicit contributions of every 
kind to this department. 

^ NEWSPAPERS. 

If one departineut of oui- work, more than another, re- 
ceives the attention of our librarian, it must be that of col- 
lecting ^Minnesota newspapers. Our state journals are thus 
rapidly becoming one of the most valuable sections of our 
library. We now receive almost every paper and magazine 
printed in Minnesota, over 70 in number, generously donated 
by their publishers; and these files arc rapidly forming an 
iinequaled collection. Eilbrts, with some sucev.-s, have been 
made to secure the earlier volumes of some of these jour- 
nals, which we did not -obtain at the time oi their publica- 
tion; and in some cases have secured the only existing tiles 
of them. The unsurpassed historical value of these volumes 
.is being daily demonstrated, and the time must soon come 



8 \ ANNUAL KEPOliT. 

' when the people ol this State will feel thankful that the now 
too lightly valued chronicles "t our times have been collect- 
ed and preserved by some one knowing their value in the 
future. The efforts made by the Miunesota Editorial Asso- 
ciation to secure a reliable history of the press of each 
county in the State, has shown that of many earh' journals not 
a file is known to be in existence. Much history not other- 
wise recorded than in these faitliful chronicles of the times, 
has thus perished. A gentleman from Southern Minnesota, 
enquiring at our rooms a short time ago for a file of an early 
territorial journal, (of which we had but an imperfect set), 
stated that if a complete lile were in existence, it would be 
worth thousands of dollars to the people of that community 
in settling the titles to properl^y alone. Impressed with the 
value of our efforts to save these ephemeral records, the 
Editorial Convention, at its session in 1869, resolved that 
the collection now being made by this Society was *'an hon- 
or and benelit to the craft," and worthy ot their aid ; and 
every publisher in the State was ui-ged to make our Library 
the depository of one complete tile of his paper. 

We are still binding up our papers into durable volumes, 
as fast as our means permit, so that at no distant day 
that department alone will compare favorably with the accu- 
mulations of older societies in other states. 

The principal gifts to this section the past year are : by 
Geo. W. Moore, 1 bound volume; James J. Ilil!, a com- 
plete file of thp. yew JValion, printed at Winnipeg during 
Kiel's Rebellion ; curious or ancient copies of papers have 
been contributed by Gov. Austin, Gen. Hancock, Chas. A. 
Manny, and S. S. Eaton. 

MArS AND ATLASES. 

By purchase and gifts wo have considerably increased our 
Map and Athis de[;artinent. Among the [)urolia>es we note 
Popple's Map of the British Empire in America^ folio, 
1733, with a most curious ma[> of the region now calK'd 
Minnesota and Wisconsin ; Scnex's Compltut ^Ulas, folio, 
1725 . with another eqmUly curious map of this region. Xu- 



MINNESOTA HISTOl'JCAL SOCIflTT. 



9 



merous smaller maps and charts in other works also pertain 
to the French and British periods of our history. We hope 
to continue adding the rude and early attempts at the cartog- 
raphy of this region to our collection, until it shall illustrate 
the full progress of geograpical discovery and exi)loratiou, 
from the earliest date down to the present time. They are 
of great historical value, and are always a choice portion of 
every historical library. Moaiuime we are making diligent 
efforts to collect every map of our own State, and portions 
of the same, that has ever been published. Tiie engraved 
map of every town and county in the stale should be in our 
portfolios. Gifts of valuable maps and charts have been re- 
ceived from Gen. G. K. Warren, Geo. 11. Stuntz, the West- 
ern Land Association, A. J. Keed, S. S. Breed, B. A. 
Mann, W. R. Wood, Philip S. Harris, M. Groif, and others, 
and a fine MS. geological map or chart of this State, from 
Mr. W. D. Huribut, of Rochester. 

MSS. 

Some interesting manuscripts have been secured the past 
year. Two of these are framed autographs ot Washington — 
one a mditary letter written during Braddock's disastrous 
campaign, while ^Vashington was a Major of Virginia militia ; 
the other during his second presidency, and addressed to 
Tobias Lear, his private secretary. They were the gift of 
Hon. Walhice ]>. AVhite, now of Washington city, but who 
was in 1 819-50 a resident and territorial otHcer of Minnesota. 
J)v/^\. O. Sweeny :dso secured lor us two other Washington 
autographs, business })apers, not historically valuable, but at 
least interesting. Hon. Alex. Ramsey also sends three 
MSS. on our northern [Minnesota boundary, and J. W. 
Prince an ancient deed. Capt. E. S. Cox contributes a laud 
patent, date I'^Sl-^, with the autograph of President Monroe. 

CABINET. 

Owing to our limited space, we have been forced to omit, 
for the present, the collection of specimens purely illu^tra- 
2 



10 



ANNUAL }iErOKT. 



ting natural history, and confine om- Cal>inet and Museum 
solely to hi>tori(al and archieological curiosities. Of these 
we have secured a ninnher, all vahiablc and curious. Of 
costumes, -sveapcuis, sacred medicine" relics, and other mat- 
ters pert;iinir.g to our fast disappearing Indian trihes, wo 
have received gratifying additions; and if our friends and 
patrons will make a little elloi t to procure for us such speci- 
mens of th.s nature as they can obtain possession of, we will 
soon secure a cabinet that will illustrate every portion of the 
customs and religion of our Minnesota Indian tribes, and 
wipe out the rei)roach mentioned by eastern tourists, that 
our State had done ncjthinicto collect these memorials of the 
once owners of her donniin. Rapidly such relics and curios- 
ities arc being exported from the State by travelers, to enrich 
collections abroad. Shall not our own State have the pref- 
erence ? 

To this department Capt. E. St. Julian Cox contributes 
an ornamental head-dress, once worn by Little Crow ; J. M. 
Davis, of Superior, a small birch bark canoe ; stone weapous 
have also been received Ironj Geo. C Lynch, a specimen of 
wampum Irom Chas. eT. Wright, of xMinneapolis : and a carved 
bone weapon Irom Di'. AV. W. Sweney, of Red Wing. 

Dr. S. also presents us with an(jiher curiosity, ol much 
interest. It is a gun bai re! of tln^ style called ''Queen Anne's 
arm," dug up at Barji Hlufi', n^-ar Krd ^^'ing, three feet un- 
der groujid, over which a huge tree had grown, indicating 
by its age, the la}>-c <>f .-i fid I century since the gun was 
})laced there. How, ov by whox^ hand this old lashioned 
weapon n\ a.^ thus hitlden, "a hundred years ugo," is mere 
conjectnie — perhaps by some of tiie earl\' ex])lorers, or vo}*- 
ageurs before the da\ s (;f , Jonathan Carvei*. The lock of the 
gun \n;i-^ full cocked. Tnliaps its owaei" made it iTady for 
use, but was stricken down by s')me eiu iny before he could 
Ubc it. 

We have also received fro:!i Dr. C. Hill, ol Tine Island, 
a cnriou>ly iuleigrown limb ol' a trt e; trcnn Kev. Jc^hn h'c- 
land, ^[)e^imens ol lava from Mt. ^'esuviu^; from Dr. S. D. 
Flagg, a curiously woven garment, found on a IVruvian 
mummy ; and Irom llvv. K. D. Neill, Dublin, lieland, a stone 



MINNESOTA HISTORICAL SOCIETY. 



11 



aboriginal weapon, foiii;(l in an Iii^h bog, romarkably simi- 
lar rn shape and material to tho^e found in this.State. Coins 
and numismatic specimens have been received from Hon. 
E. F. Drake, E. L. Fryer, J. B. Chaney, F. E. DuToit, 
Chas. J. Iloadley an«l others. 

engravi?:gs. 

A few engravings, photographic views, portraits, etc., all 
relating to this State, have been secured. Messrs. Stoner & 
Ruger, of Madison, Wis., the publishers of lithographic views 
of Minnesota cities, have sent eight of their views. J. C. 
Wise, of jNIankato, and J. Tl ompson, of Anoka, each con- 
tribute one; Prof. J. L. Noyes, of Faribault, two framed 
])hotographs ; Thomas Bower, of St. Paul, OLie do. 

ARCn^r.OLOGY. 

We are still industriouilv collectius: all the facts and in- 
formation possible regard ing the aboriginal tunmli, and earth- 
works in this State. The most valuable cont:ibution to our 
stock of archaM)l()gical information during the year, was the 
lengthy and elaborate report of Mr. C. H. Baker, civil en- 
gineer, now of Philadelphia, on the rifle pits (so called) on 
the upper MississipjM Kiver, near Red Cedar River. This 
was the tirst scientilic examination of these earth works, 
which though long known to many persons, (one of whom, 
]\Ir. T. B. ^^'alker, of Minneapolis, had reported them to the 
Society) have not been mentioned in the books of any of the 
explorers. Mr. leaker's paper was purely topographical, and 
it would be desiiable to have any traditional account of these 
works, (which S(yme think compaiatively recent) that may 
exist. For briefer descriptions of ancient iuniuH^ we are in- 
debted to lion. !>. D. vSpiague, of Uushford ; F. A. Atwatcr, 
ot the St. V. c'i P. R. R. ; E. I^m leau, of the St. P. c^' S. C. R. 
R. ; and to Messrs. Cfeo. R. wSluulz, Charles J. Wright, and 
O. E. Garrison, U. S. Dejuity Surv(>yors, for similar in- 
formation, noted by them during recent explorations. 



12 



ANNUAL KEPOKT. 



EXCHANGES. 

Our system of exchanges with other societies and institu- 
tions is constantly increasin^^, and now forms a prominent 
source of our accessions. W^e "^ratefuUv acknowledii-e valu- 
able gifts from a nutnbor of societies in Europe and Ameri- 
ca, euumerited in the ai)pendix. We have distributed to 
them, in addition to our own publications, such works and 
documents relating to this State as we could obtain, and in 
this we have been generously aided by individuals and insti- 
tutions who have placed at our disposal quantities of their 
publications. We are std! endeavoring to extend our ex- 
change system, and will no d. ibt, include in time nearly all 
the societies and learned bodies of this cjuntry, and many 
in the Old World. 

PUBLICATIONS. 

The small appropriation made by the last Legislature to 
enable us to continue the issue of our Historical Collections, 
was the means of securing the publication of Part 1, Vol. 3, 
a neat octavo book of 138 pages, its contents are not sur- 
passed in variety and interest by any i)revious issue of the 
Society, while in typographical execution it is certainly su- 
perior to any of them. It was well received by our mem- 
bers, while the press of the State, and literary reviews in 
other States, -^vith scarce an exception, gave it the most flat- 
tering notices. From other Societies also, and from histo- 
rical scholars elsewhere, we have received gratifying approval 
of its interest and value. It has been the means of securing 
us already considerable returns in the way of exchanges. 

The first vohune of our Collections, i-.sued in five parts of 
various dates, from 1850 to I6r>i), is now exiiausted, and we 
have not a copy left. Xumerous requests have been made 
for it b}' our corres[)ondents, and Societies in exchange witli 
us, and its re-]jublication seems demanded. It contains many 
valuable papers, and as those having our later volumes are 
desirous of securing that also, its issue will be advantageous 
to us in many ways. 



MIXKESOTA HISTOIUCAL SOCIETY. 



13 



The design ot these Collections originally was to secure 
and publish material for the History of Minnesota. Many 
incidents and facts ot a valuable nature, throwing light on 
obscure points, are as yet unrecorded, and exist only in the 
memory of our old pioneers. These pioneers are rapid Iv 
passing away, and unless we soon secure their reminiscences 
and contributions to our early history, it will be too late. 
Especial exertions must l)e made, tberef<jre, to secure papers 
of real interest and value, and print them in our Collec- 
tions, which we hope to continue from year to year. Nu- 
merous promises have been made us by early settlers to 
record their personal ex[)eriences of frontier life, and we 
hope they will not [)rocrastinate until it is too late. While 
this Society is expected to secure such narratives, and is 
anxious to do so, our success, of course, depends on the 
efforts of those who hold these materials for^ history. And 
if posterity censures us for not securing them, we must place 
the sin of omission where it belongs. To the pioneers of the 
State we again say, do not longer delay giving us your re- 
cord of the early days of ^linnesota. You can each contri- 
bute valuable facts, that perhaps no other one now living 
may know. And to our members generally, we appeal lo 
secuie the MSS, ot deceased pioneers, which, in many oases 
are valuable, but may only become wasted or lost in time, 
by unappreciativc liands. 

PASSING AWAY. 

Death has indeed been busy the past year among onr pio- 
neers, most of whom were men)bers of this Socic-ty. Five ot 
the^sc ceaacJ their lite-work during 1870. Hon. I). S. N\n-t(jr., 
one of our Senatoi s in Congress, a i)u})lic olHcer of marked 
ability; P^x-Lieut. Gov. Wm. Holcombe, an early pior.eer 
of the St. Croix \^alley, a man of great j)urify of ch;irarter ; 
Kev. T. il. Cres.^ey, a clergyman whose pioneering mis-ii;n- 
ary labors made him widely known to the settlers in almtst 
every hamlet on our prairies and in our forests ; Vetal 
• Guerin, almost the founder ot St. Paul, and at his death i:s 
oldest living settler ; and more representatively the true pi,>. 



11 



ANNUAL KEPOilT. 



neer than all, Joseph 11. Biowii, who at the time of his death 
was the oldest living white settler of Minnesota, and identi- 
fied with it for over torty years. A memoir of his eheeker- 
ed and eventful life is in preparation, and steps have been 
taken to secure a portrait. These rapid deaths among our 
early settlers admonish us that whatever we do must be done 
quickly. Our work has not bccu commenced too soon, and 
should be prosecuted with vigor. 

IvOOMS. 

Attention was called in our last annual report to the fact 
that our accommodations are coiitinually becoming more lim- 
ited. We will now very shortly reach a point at which 
more room must be; secured, or the Society be greatly im- 
peded and cramped in its growth and operations. It is evi- 
dent that our present quarters, or any quarters which we 
can secure in the present Capitol, will, at no very distant 
day, prove insufhcient for us; so that we are justified in 
again earnestly calling the attention of our members to the 
fact that the construction of our long contemplated fire proof 
building is not the dream of a visionary, but an actual duty 
which will soon devolve upon us to perform. 

FINANCES. 

r 

The appropriation of last session has been used and ex- 
l^eiided by us in the most careful mannei*, and with a view 
to secure the b( st results, as our accounts and records, to 
which we refer with some pride, will show. Still, we have 
been cramped by insutlicient means to properly perform the 
work expected of us, and hope, if consistent with other de- 
mauds on our State Treasury, that our ap[)rc)])i iution may lie 
slightly increased. 

AN ENDOWMENT FUND. 

Meantime an eflbrt has been made by the Society to se- 
cure bome means independent of that source. Some pro- 



MINNESOTA llISTOr.ICAI. SOCIETY. 



15 



gress has boon iniidc (lie pint year, in socui ing an cikLjw- 
nicnt fund, by the sale of a few life nionibfi-^hips, arnDni^ 
our citizens who wish to aid the Sociot}'. We cann(>t ex- 
pect, however, in a nv,\v community like ours, to find many 
who have the means to di-votc to such a purj)ose ; so that 
the amount realized is not asycthirjre, but a commencement , 
at least, has been made, which may yet result in imporLiuii 
aid. The funds j>;ained from this source, are invested in .se- 
curities, and called the Permanent Fund, the principal of 
which is irrevocably pledged to remain undimini-shed, the 
interest only being used as a pui'chasing or binding fund. 

Ill our last amnial report, some reference was made to 
the desiral/ilily of bequests in aid of our Societ}^ It was 
believed that many of our members and other citizens woul I 
it tlieir attention was called to their dut}' in the matter, 
make provision in their wills, for a >mall bequest to this So- 
ciety, towards the accumulation ol a Permanent Fund. 
Since then, we have an example in a neighboring city, which 
ought not to l)e without its silent eflect. The Minneapolis 
Alheneum was the recipient, tlirough the will of one of its 
members, of a bequest of $20,000 in pj'operty, yielding an 
income of $2,000 })er year. It is but seldom in the west 
that public institutions receive such liberal bequests, because 
there are as yet not m.my of that clas^e of ])ers()ns here, who 
have the means and dis[)osition to so use them. To tio-ne 
extent, however, every pei'son htis means which he can thus 
dispose of, and we again urge upon our members and other 
citizens the claims of this Society. ICven a veiy sm;dl be- 
quest made by e.ich member towards our Permanent Fund, 
or to aid in the erection of a building for our use, will in a 
few years provide us with a handsome endo\vn)eiit, the in- 
come of which \vill be am[)le to enable us to aecornpli^Dh tullv 
all our pu' i)oses. 

A FIliM FOUNDATION KSTAliMSlFFJ). 

T!ie present success of the Societv sh )uld assure such 
j)atrons, tliaL whatever is given in this way, will be ri^htlv 
used. AVe have passed the [)eriod of ex[)e! iment. Our sue- 



16 



AXXUAL KEPOliT. 



cess recently has shown what we can do with means. Now 
firmly established, our future prosperity seems insured. 
There seems to be one law controlling the growth of puljlic 
institutions, which all must have noticed. Once, through 
struggles and toil, perhaps, an institution becomes well es- 
tablished, it never lacks friends. Men delight to aid the 
already prosperous cause, who t!:rn indifierently away from 
the appeals of the feeble or decliniug one. . A writer in the 
New York Evening Post, speaking of a gitt to a similar 
institution in another State, well dcOncd this law : Let a 
foundation be well established, so as to inspire entire confi- 
dence in its perpetuity, and free gifts and offerings will be 
made to it from all quarters, aaJ il will go on increasing in 
importance and resources beyond the wildest dreams of its 
founders." This law will apply to us, as the foundation is 
already established, and we may look for gifts and bequests 
of increasing value and number to llov/ in upon us. 

OUK FUTURE. 

Indeed, so perfect and well matured are now our plans for 
carrying on the work of the Society, that we need only means 
to enable us to make our institution one which the generations 
who follow us will admiringly api)reciate. We have a work 
to do, that, though not lully understood or valued now, per- 
haps, must in time become estimated in its true importance. 
Engrossed now as all are by material wants and cares, but 
few in our State have the lin:ie and wi^h to project their pur- 
suits beyond those dcuiiands of the present. But we canaot 
lose the golden years that would elapse );efore in this slow 
march of progress, we could meet the general sympathy of 
all. We commenced in good time to perform our work, 
and must unflaggingly improve each moment as it passes. 
To abandon it is to lose opportunities that no regrets of the 
future, which will surely follow such neglect, will avail to 
make good. 

But that luture will bring no such regrets — for it is full of 
promise. And adopting as our motto Sj)e et Lahore, we 
patiently Hon:, while we L.xnoR, for more extended means 
and coriesponding success and usefulness. 

St. Paul, Jan. y, 1^71. 



I 

/7 



LIST OF DONOES— 1870. 

FBOM INDIVIDUALS. 

Bound 

V0I9. PampWets. 

Gov. Horace Austin 3 15 

Wm. S. Appleton, Boston 1 

Geu. C. C. Andrews, Copenhagen 1 

Hon. H. D. Barron, Washington 1 

Prof. D. F. Boyd, La. State Uuiv 1 

R. C. Bnrdick, Winnipeg. .■ 2 

Rev. C. D. Bradlee, Boston 3 

Samuel S. Breed, St. Paul 2 

Andrew Boyd, Albanj^ 10 

Capt. R. Bhikeley, St. Paul 1 

Dr. J. K. Barnes, Surg. Gen. U. S. A 2 

Wm. S. Combs, St. Paul 2 2 

M. Conant. La Crosse 3 

Robert Clarke, Cincinnati 5 19 

Judge R. F. Crowell 1 7 

F. T. Cansick, London, Kng 1 

W. 11. Cautield. B:iraboo, Wis 2 

CO. Cotlin, Boston 1 

Charles A. Cutter, Boston 12 14 

J. B. Chancy, St. Paul 10 

Ossian E. Dodge, St. Paul 20 

Clayton IL DeLano, N. Y 1 

John Ward Dean, Boston 8 8 

Daniel S. Durrie, Madison, Wis 1 25 

Hon. I. DoiMU'lly, Ilasiiiigs \\ 

Rev. James Dobbin, Faribault 4 

C. II. Davidson. Austin 1 

C. H. Dixon, St. Paul 1 

a 



18 



akkuatj report. 



B'»und 
Volt Panpb:?U. 

Gen. J. Watts De Pcystcr, N. Y 1 

lion. M. 11. Diinncll 1 

Mrs. Mary H. Eastman, Washington 1 

Louis E. Fisher, St. Paul 17 

W. W. Folwell, State University 1 

J. G. Fanshawc, London, Eng 3 

Wm. II. Grant, St. Paul 11 

A. T. Goodman, Cleveland, O 1 

Dr. Samuel A. Green, Boston. 25 8G4 

Rev. A. Gale, Minneapolis 1 

Geo. A. Hamilton, St. Paul 3 3 

James J. Hill, St. Paul 5 - 6 

Dr. F. V. Hayden, Washington 1 

A. J. Hill, St. Paul 23 11 

Chas. J. Hoadley, Conn 3 

Chas. II. Hart, Pliiladelphla 1 

George Hezlep, Saint Peter 1 

W. D. Hurlbut, Pochester 1 

Dr. Franklin B. Hough, N. Y 1 22 

John L. Hayes, Boston 23 

Dr. Edward Jarvis, Boston 61 

J. Jay Knox, Washington 8 2 

Rev. N. Lathrop, Payncsville, Minn 6 

N. P. Langford, Helena, Mon 1 

Rev. Isaac P. Lang worthy IS 

Hon. Wm. Lochren, Minneapolis 23 

W. H. Mitchell, Xorthfleld 2 

Rev. Dr. McMasters, St.Paul 5 

Alfred Moore, St. Paul 1 

J. AV. McClung, St. Paul 1 

Geo. W. Meorc, St. Paul 1 

Joel Muusell, Albany 55 

A. Mudge, Boston 1 i 

Dr. B. Mattocks, St. Paul 1 

A. A. Meredith, Madison, Wis 1 

Prof, Edward North, Hamilton Col. N. Y 2 

Prof. J. L. Noyos, Faribault 1 " 

Mrs. Newiiigton, St, Paul 1 

Rev. E. D. Ncill, Dublin, Ireland 3 1 

Dr. Wm. Prcscott, Concord, N. H 1 

S. U. Pinncy, Madison, Wis 1 

Samuel I'ark, Marshall, Ills 1 

J. W. Prince, New York City 1 2 

J. P. Pond, St. Paul 3 19 

Prof. W. F. Phelps, Winona 50 

lion. AU'X Pamsoy iS 117 

Daniel liolirer, St. Paul 5 

S. B. Pvobinson, La. State Univ 1 

Geo. P. Kowell & Co., N. Y 2 



MINNESOTA IirSTOKICAL SOCI.KTY. 19 

Bound 

Vols. PamphleU. 

Kev. Chandler Robbius, UD., Boston 1 

D. Ramaley, St. Paul i 

C. S. Siras, Prescott, Ontario 1 

Dr. K. O. Swcen3% St. Paul 5 25 

Dr. E. Herman Smiih, St. Paul 2 1 

Capt. E. Y. Shelley, St Paul.: 2 

Rev. James Shrigley 1 

W. Hudson Stephens, Lowville, N. Y 2 2 

Hon. A. C. Smith, Forest City, Minn 2 

Rev. E. M. Stone, Providence, R. I I 

Wra. B. Trask, Boston ' 9 

Rev. J. F. Tutlle, Wabash Coll, Ind 6 

Irving Todd, Hastings 21 

El wood E. Thorno, N. Y. City 2 2 

Alpheus Todd, Otta^Ya, Can 3 

Addison Van Name, Librarian Yale College 1 75 

Rev, F. A. Whitney, Brighton, Mass 10 

Thos. H. Wynne, Richmond, Ya 1 

Prof. II. B. Wilson, Red Wing, Minn I 

Dr. Oliver Warner, Boston, Mass .... 1 

Hon. W. C- Watson, Port Kent, N. Y 1 2 

Hon. E. M. Wilson, Minneapolis, Minn 2 2 

J. F. Williams, St. Paul 11 6 

I. P. Wright, St, Paul 2 

Hon. R. C. Winthrop, Boston 18 

Hon. Joseph S. Wilson, U. S. Gen Land Office 1 

John J. Williams, St. Paul 3 

Rev. Thos. S. Williamson, St. Peter 3 

Donors Unknown 4, 17 

FROM SOCIKTIES AJS'D ENSTITUTIONS. 

American Congregational Association, Boston 3 

National Association of Wool .Manufacturers, Boston... 4 

Iowa Historical Society 5 

,New Hampshire Historical Society 5 

Long Island Historical Society 1 

Franklin Society. Chicago 1 

Ohio ^^cchal)ics' Institute, Cincinnati, O 1 

Smithsonian Institute I 3 

American Antiquarian Society 1 

Royal Society of Northern Antiquarians, Copenhagen, 

Denmark ^ 

Kongeligc Danske, Videnskaberncs Sclskab, Copenha- 
gen, Denmark 3 

Norske University, Christiana 4. 

Massachusetts Historical Society 1 1 

Literary and Historical Society, Qiiel)ec I 

Connecticut Historical Society I 

f • ' ' • 



20 



ANNUAL HEPORT. 



Bound 
Vola. PftmphletB. 

N. E. Histor. and Gencalog. Society 1 

Chicago Historical Society 3 

Essex Institute, Salem, Mass 8 118 

Dulath Library Association 1 

Quartermaster General's Ofllce, U. S. A 3 

Y. M. Mercantile Library, Cincinnati ■ \ 

Maryland Historical Society 2 

Saint Louis Public School lioanl 1 

Peabody Institute, Baltimore 4 

Pennsylvania Historical Society 1 1 

Department of the Interior 47 

Seabury Mission, Faribault 41 

Georgia Historical Society 1 

N. Y. Mercantile Library 1 2 

American Museum of Natural nisto''v,N.Y 1 

Chicago Academy of Sciences 1 

New Jersey Historical Society 1 

Leeds (Eng.) Phil, and Lit. S9cicty 1 

Philadelphia Library Company 4 1 



4903 



^ — 



ANNUAL REPORT 



OF THE 



NESOTA Historical Society 



T»» THi: 



LEGISLATURE OE MINNESOTA. 



KOK THE YKAU 1S71 




Head and adopted at the Aininal Mietimj of the Societi/ 
January S, 1872. 



SAINT VXV\, : 
l». KAMAI.KY, I'klNTKK 
1872. 



ANNUAL REPORT 

OF THE 



Minnesota Historical Society, 

TO THE 

LEGISLATURE OF MINNESOTA, 

FOR THE YEAR KS7I. 




Bead and adopted at (he Annual Meeting of the Society 
January 8, 1S72. 



SAINT PAUL : 
D . i: A M A L E Y , T K I N T K J{ . 
1872. 



OFFICERS OF Til]' SOCIETY. 



PRESIRKXT, 

CIIAKLKS K. ?.TAyO. 

VICE rnr.sjni.NTS, 

1. JAMES J. JIILL, 

2. A. GOODJilCII, 

3. K. 0. SWJ: ENY. 



SECRKTAUV 



A MS, 



EXECUTIVE 



George A. Hamilton, 
Rev. Jolin Mattooks, 
Capt. R. Blakclcj, 
Rev, F. T, ]3rowii, 
J. B. Chancy, 
Hon, E. F.^ Drake, 
A. J. Hill,' 
James J. Hill, 
Rev. John Ireland, 
Wm. H. Kellcy, 
KxGov, W. R. Mnrslmll, 
Dr, Brewer Mattock?, 
GcD. H. II. Sibley, 



Oiailcs Vj. Mayo, 
Pvev, S. Y. MeMastcrs, 
J. }\ Pond, 
11. O. Sweeny, 
J. F. Williams, 
James W. Taylor, 
Col. John L. Mcrriam, 
• })r. A. Falkenshield, 
Judf'C A. Goodrich, 
Jiu1l;c John M. Berry, 
Dr. J. B. Phillips, 
Dr. T. D. Simojjton. 



llErORT OF THE EXECUTIVE COUNCIL. 



The continued success of the Society ia an object for con- 
gratulation and pleasant retrospect, as we assemble in an- j 
iiual meeting this evening. The past year has been one j 
marked in our career, as showing the most rapid advancement ' 
and success, and is truly encouraging to the friends and pat- 1 
rons of our Society. Wc feel the more j/ride, perhaps, in \ 
our present prosperous and satisfactory condition, when wo \ 
reflect that it has been within such a brief time, and uiulcr so . < 
many discouragements and difficulties, that we have achieved • 
that condition, and only by a systematic good manngc- j 
ment, patiently carrying out plans comprehensively laid 
after careful study and reflection. Several years ago it was 
stated in our annual report, that we needed only means to 
enable us to make our Society successful and useful — a fact 
we have abundantly demonstrated, even with the limited 
means at our disposal. And we have now reached a point 
where our usefulness will not be denicil, especially by tlio 
many citizens who have foftnd our libr;uy furnished with 
means, nowhere else to be found in our State, to pursue legal, 
historical and statistical investigations. 

THE LIRRARY. 

Our library has increased gratifyingly the past year, both 
in value and size. During 1871, there were received as fol- 
lows: Bound volumes, 712; pamphlets and unbound vol- 
mncs, 850; manuscripts, 91; photographs, 7; engravings, 
5; curiosities, 37; maps, Gl ; files of papers, 8. Total, 1,352 
different articles. 

The sources from which the bound volumes were received. 



aro: from donations, 208; from exchange, 3G : bj purchaec, 

380; binding, 88. 

The following table will show the continued advance of 

the Library for several years past : 



No. report- 


Books. 


Pamphlets. 


Total In 


ed ia 




Librarj. 


1861 


826, 


1,236, 


2,062 


1866 


958, 


1,266, 


2,224 


1867 


• 1,037, 


1,378, 


2,415 


1868 


- 1,155, 


2,136, 


3,291 


1869 


. 2,330, 


3,632, 


6.0G2 


1870 


• 3,191, 


5,722, 


8,913 


1871 


- 4,017, 


7,301, 


11,318 


1872 


- 4,710, 


8,157, 


12,876 



While the number of volumes added is not so largo as wo 
have before reported in one year, their average value is 
much greater, and has enhanced the average value of the 
entire collection. 



j PRINCIPAL WORKS ADDED. 

I Both by gift and purchase, especially the latter, a largo 
t number of very valuable works havo been added to the 
I Library. AVo can no better show how our various dopart- 
1 ments aro rapidly becoming filled with them than by giving 
below a few of the more important additions : 

Oeneral American and State IlistoricB. — Bancroft's History of tbo 
United States, 9 vols.; IIo-wc's Historical Collections of Virginia; do 
i of New York; Burke's British Empire in America (1741); French's 
Gazetteer of the State of New York; Ilolloway'i IliBlory of Krvnsas; 



j rare pamphlets on the American Revolution, 2 toIs.; Berber's Ilislor- 
l ical Collections of New Jersey; Carroll's Historical Collections of South 
Carolina, 2 yols.; Uawke's History of North Carolina, 2 vols.; Hamil- 
ton's United States, 7 vols ; Gibb's Documentary History of the Rev- 
olution, 3 vols.; Footc's Virginia; Webber's Talcs of the Border; 
Meek's Romantic Passages in Soutljwcstcrn History; Dewccs* Letters 
from Texas (18.'34); Ramsey's Annals of Tennessee; Howe's Historical 
Collections of the Great West; Howe's The Times of tlio Rebellion 
in the West ; Irving's Conquest of Florida; Mrs. Kcrablc's Life on a 
Georgia Plantation; History of Herkimer Co., N.V.; Pre-Columbian 
Discovery of North America; Bonnyc.iallc; Spanish America; Fan- 
court's Yucatan; Abbott's Mo.xico; Clavigcro's History of ^loxico, 3 
vols.; Masgachusctts Historical Socicty'i Collections, 2 vols.; Brad- 
ford's Dialogue; Hough's History of Lewis Co., N. Y.; History of 
Franklin, Conn. 



2linn€sota Historical Society 5 \ 

Western Uistory. — Domcncch's Scrcn Yenrs' rcaidonco ia'tho Deserts • 
of North AmcrlcR, 2 vols; La Sftllu'a Voyage, (Paris, 1871); Early j 
Indiana Trials and Sketches; Peck's Irami;^rftnt3' Guide, 1831; Amcri- ' 
can Pioneer, 2 toIs.; Cox's Ttccollections of Iho Early Settlement of } 
Wabash Valley; Fireland's Pioneer. 7 vols.; Hall's Letters from tho | 
Wosl; IlaH'fl The West, its Soil, Productions, itc.; Hall's Notes on the J 
Western Slatea; Knapp's History of Ashland Co., O.; Norton's His- \ 
tory of Knox Co., O.; Pioneer Record of Ross Co., O.; Old !>Iacki- i 
navr, or the Fortress of the Lakes; Gazetteer of ^n3Souri(lS37); Uood'a 
Forest Scenes; Kohl'a Kitchi Oami; Northrop's Pioneer History of • 
3Icdina Co., O.; IMrs. Kinzie's Waubun, or Early days in the Itorthwest; [ 
Fremont's Exploring Expedition, 1843; Wallace's Oregon Question; 
Western Clearings, by Mrs. Kirkland; Life in the West; Brice's Histo- 
ry of Fort Wayne, Ind.; Twiss* Oregon Question Examined; Pember- 
ton's Van Couver Island; British Columbia and Van Couvcr's Island; , 
Four Years in British Columbia; Dunn's History of Oregon; Ohio ; 
Valley Miscellanies; Grecnbow'a History of Oregon; Historical sketch- \ 
C3 of Michigan, 1836. [ 

7^ateU and Explorations in America. — Trollopc's North America, 3 ^ 
vols.; ^I.ixlmllian of Wicd's Travels in do.; Carver's Travels, 2d Lon- j 
don edition; La Hontan, 2 editions; Avanturcs Lc St. Beau, 2 vols., 5 
Reccuil do Voyages, 7 vols.; LaPothcrie; llistoirc de America; Hind's 
Narrative of Travel; Ashe's Travels in America, 3 vol.; Cliambers' < 
Things in America,; Chastellnx's TrAvcls, 2 vols.; Chateaubriand, j 
2 vols.; Talbot's Five Years In America; liirkbcck's Letters from ; 
Illinois; Fcarou's Narrative of a 5,000 mile Voyage in America; j 
Across tho Rocky Jlountains; Schoolcraft's Travels in Central Por- |. 
tions of tho Mississippi Valley; ]\Iarryatt'a Di;\ry in America, G vols.; : 
Cluny's American Traveler, 17G0. I 

Sia'6 Documents and Puhlicaiions. — Iowa Agricultural and Insur- )_ 
anco Reports, 1S70, 3 vols.; Laws and Documcnt.s of Iowa, C vol.; 
Census of Iowa, 1 vol.; Agriculture of Mass., 2 vols.; Board of Edu- 
cation of ]^Ias3achu3ett3, 1 vol.; Adjutant General's Report, 1 vol.; 
School Committee of Boston; Board of State Charities; Illinois Agri- \ 
cultural Society, 5 vols.; Board of Public Charities of Pa., 1 vol.; ■ 
Manual of the ^lichigan Legislature; do of Vi'isconsin; do of Illinois. j 
Wisconsin Agricultural Reports; Census of New York, 1855 and 1865, I 
folio, 2 vols.; State Engineer's Reports, 3 vols.; Statutes of Canada, 
26 vols.; Geological Survey of Ohio; Geology of Iowa, 2 vols. 

Works on the nebcllion.—\Zo\.Vs Great Rebellion; Battlefields of tho 
South; Putnam's Rebellion Record, 12 vols.; History of Duryea's 
Brigade; Dyer Court of Inquiry, 2 vols.; Fourth Re-union Army of 
Cumberland; &c. 

Uihliography. ^^\h\n'% Dictionary, parts 15 to 22; Tho Book Buyer, 
2 vols.; Smith's Catalogue of Americana; Rhccs' Manual of Public 
Libraries; Ludwiir's Literature of American Aboriginal Languages; 



I C Annual Rf.port. ; 

i • * 

: J. Pnyno Collier's Bibliograpby, 4 vols.; Lowndc'a Bibliographers' . 

j Manual, 4 vols. | 

I American Indiana and Antiquities. — Tliatclicr's Indian Biography; 

1 Finlcy'8 Life among the Indians; Catlin's Nortli American Indians, 2 j 

} vols.; Kennedy's Origin of tlie North American Indians; Discovery j 

I of America by Northmen; Schoolcraft's ^lyths of Hiawatha; Brad- ; 

1 ford's American Antiquities; Stephens' Travels in Yucatan, 6cc., 4 j 

I vols.; Reports of Commissioner of Indian Aflfairs, 9 vols. j 

Ifudson's Bay, Red Ricer and Brttith America. — Chappcl's Narrative \ 

of R voyage to Hudson's Bay, 1817; Notes on thn Claims of the Ilud- ) 

son's Bay Co., 1817; Sketcli of the British Fur Trade in North Amor- 

'ica, 181C; Ellis' Voyage to Hudson's Bay, 1717; Ilusscirs lied Uivcr 

Country; lluyschc's Red River E.xpcdition (of 1870); Ilcrriot's Canada; 

Buckingham's do; Hochalcga, or England in America; Franklin's 

Copper Mine River; " Dot it Down," or Life in the Northwest; Hi3^ 

tory of the Red River Troubles (of 1870). j 

Biogr>Tphy and Ocnenlogy. — John Adams' Life and "Works; Lifn of ■ 

Sir Thomas Simpson; Jlrs. Ellct's Pioneer Women of Iho West: Burko'a < 

Armoury of Gr«at Britain and Ireland; Burke's Peerage and Baro- ; 

nctrtge; Burk'cs Extinct Peerage; Burke's Landed Gentry of Great | 

Britain and Ireland, 2 vols.; Burke's Royal Families of Great • 

Britain, 2 vols.; Bancroft's Life of Wa3hinc:ton; Barton's Lifo of 

Andrew Jackson, 3 vols,: iMisccllanea Gcncalogia ct Hcraldica; Vis- ' 

Ration of Leicestershire, 1G19; Ancestry of Pri.«'cilla Baker, by W. S. j 

Applcton; McBride's Pioneer Biography, 2 voh; Life of Gen. Nathan- \ 

icl Lyon; Life cf Rev. C. Bowles; ^Icn of Progress; ilarshall's Index > 

to printed Pedigrees; Visitation to Notinghamshire. \ 

Encyclopedias and Works of R'ferencc. — Ga/.ctlccr of the AV'orld, 14 

vols.; Appleton's American Encyclopedia, IC vols.; Annuals do, 10 

vols.; Encyclopedia Brittanica, 22 vols.; Nilcs Register, i>2 vols.; i 

Dodsley's Annual Register, 75 vols.; Edinburgh Review, 40 vols.; '• 

Smithsonian Contribution to Knowledge, vol. 17. ? 

• Archives and Public Papers. — State Papers and Public Documents of 

the United States, 17S3 to 1810, 12 vols.; Correspondence regarding ; 

International Boundary; Journals of the Congress of the United 

States, 2d to 9th inclusive; Documents of the 3d Session 40th Con- ; 

gress, 27 vols.; Hamilton's Federalist; Forest Laws of England; Gen- ' 

cral Land office Reports, 1842-6C, 12 vols.; Congressional Globe, 2d 

Session, 40th Congress, 6 vols. ^ 

PDRCIIASKS. ^ I 

I 

Very fortunately wc Lave been enabled this year to largely 
increase our pnrcliases over any former year. In all 1^759 
have been expended for books, niapazinee, etc., against $237 
last year. Our arrangements for purelia.«;ing cheaply and to i 



7 



advantage, and securing the rare works we need, liavc been 
greatly perfected, and arc now believed to be all that can 
bo desired. Notwitlislaiuling the rarity of most of the 
Avorks wo have purchased, (works which are now in 
{rroat request for the many Libraries now being formed in 
tlic United States,) the average cost of each volume is 
quite reasonable— $2.00, against $1.07 in 1870. The list 
of books given before, shows the kind of books we are en- 
deavoring to cqllect. Oui'- first care was to secure works re- 
lating, directly or indirectly, to our State; then, works on 
the history of the nortliwest, and west at large, and espe- 
cially on the Hudson's l^ay, and ]^ed jviver region ; and all 
maps and charts of this region, (;r sr.y portion thereof. 
Sonic advance has been made also, into the field of general 
Anierican History, l^iography, (Jeogra])hy and Statistics, as 
wcUasinthatof our Indians Ti ibes and A mcrican| Antiquities. 
Nor has the department of reference bet Ji neglected, as the 
Encyclopedias and Gazeilccrs added show; while works on 
Bibliography, indispensable in working a library, have not 
been overlooked. On the whole, we may congratulate our- 
selves on the results of the year's purchases. AVc have gone 
on carefully and judiciousl}*, strengthening the most valua- 
ble departments of our library, as far as our means would 
permit, nor have we unduly increased one, at the expense ) 
of others. ' \ 

GIFTS. ' I 

Our friends and patrons have rcmend)crcd us the past 
year with many very generous gifts, some of (hem of nnich 
value and interest. Dr. Samuel A. Giccn, of Boston, con- • 1 
tinues his kind interest in our success, 20 bound and '133 
unbound volumes having come from his generous hand. 
James J. llill, of our Executive Council, adds 26 volumes 
of Canada Laws and Statutes to our department of State 
Laws and documents, besides five volumes of history. Hon. 
J. T. Averill has sent us 37 public doc\nncnts, and Hon. 
Alex. Kamscy 25 do ; Dr. Ciinrles H. Boardman contributes 
a fino set ot the Edinhurgh JUvic\L\ vols. 1 to -10; George j 



8 Annual Report, 

Culver, of St. Paul, 33 volumes of mncli interest ; Eobcrt 
Clarke, of Cincinnati, an old and generous contributor to 
our Library, enriches it with 8 works on western history, 
and Dr. F. B. Iloygh, of New York, with a number of val- 
iiablo historical and statistical volumes. To Hon. W. S. 
Applcton, of Boston ; Geo. W. Childp, of Philadelphia ; 
Gen. W. S. Hancock ; Dr. Edward Jar vis, of ^fassachusetts ; 
J. Mimsell, Albany; W. JI. Stej)hcn8, Lowvillc, N. Y.; 
Hon. James Shaw, Illinois; ancF many olhers, our thanks 
are gratefully tendered for valuable works and other gifts. 
The list of our contributors will bo found in the appendix. 
In all, 151 persons and institutions have contributed to our 
success tho present year, for which wo return our grateful 
aclcnowledgments. 

PAMPIILKTS. 

Our pamphlet collection is increasing in a satisfactory 
manner. AYc have now over 8,000 pamphlets, and unbound 
volumes, most of them valuable, and frequently referred to. 
Many of them can, with mucli advantage, bo bound, if our 
means, and tho facilities for such work here would warrant 
tho 6tep. The principal donors this year have been, Dr. 
Samuel A. Green, 422; Dr. F. ]]. Hough, 51; John J. 
Kno?:, 27; Robert Clarke, 35; Dr. Edward Jarvis, 16; Joel 
Munsell, Albany,- 14; Pev. W. S. Alexander, Eacine, 
10, &c. 

NEWSl'ArEHS. 

Gratifying additions have been made to our newspaper 
collection since our last report. The publishers of our State, 
with no exception worth noting, generously contribute their 
papers to this Society, by which they aro cared for as their 
value and importance demands. We have now 2G7 bound vol- 
umes of newspapers, the greater i)ortion of them }^[innesota 
journals, reachiifg back to 1S49, nud they aro increasing at 
tho rate of 50 volumes per year. During tlio past year wo 
bavG had 70 volumes bound, and there nro but few now 
awaiting the binder's art. No department of our Library 



JIi?i?icso(a Historical Society. 9 

can be moro valuable than this, and none is more frequently 
consulted. We are almost daily gratified that our care in 
collecting and preserving these memorials of the times, has 
been of tho greatest Value to some of our citizens, uho have 
consulted them for legal, statistical, or historical data. In 
time, these must' constitute tho great treasury of facts for 
tho historians, biographers or statisticians of our State, and 
our efforts in securing and preserving them will be rightly 
appreciated. During the year several files have been pre- 
Bcnted to us — by Gov. Austin, 4 volumes (unbound) of tho 
Ne\D York Tribune for 1870; and by G. A. Hamilton, 4 
volumes of Saint Pan! papers, preserved by himself, togeth- 
er with G volumes filed in the oflice of the Saint Paul & 
Sioux City E. R. Company. 

rOKTEAITS. 

AVo have been fortunate tho past year in securing three 
portraits which are valuable to our collection. One is a 
capital likeness of Maj. Joseph 11. Brown, the widely known 
I pioneer and public man of Minnesota, presented by his fara- 
; ily. Second — an oil portrait of Eamsey Crooks, the Presi- 
1 dent of the American Fur Company, the gift of liis son. 
Col. Wm. Crooks, of St. Paul. The third, unframed as yet, 
I is a tinted photograph of J. P. Faribault, at the time of his 
i deatktho oldest white settler in our State. It is tho gift of 
j Judge Perry, who kindly procured it for ns from a nmaU 
\ copy in possession of the family of the deceased. 

I ■ OTHER PICTURES. 

j Nathan Myrick presents us with a large photograph of 
I a grou]) of Sioux Chiefs and warriors, who, in 1S59 went 
\ to ATashington on some treaty business. Jifost, if not all 
j of tho twenty-one Dakotah celebrities represented in tho 
I group, are now dead, rendering the picture somewhat valu- 
i- able as a memento of these once celebrated characters who 
held sway over what now constitutes the most oi tho settled 
portion of our State. Charles E. Zimmerman, the talented 
artist of Saint Vaul, has also donated to the Society a num- 
ber of portraits of pId.j>^_lU ^j-H i , .a n j liistoiical views. Our 



JO Annual licport. 



j only rc^ct is that our ^vall room lias become so limited that 
j wo cannot properly display ^vliat pictures wo have, a fact 
I which but poorly encourages others to contributo to what 
j wo hopo may (in time) become the nnclcus of a creditable art 
' gallery. 

j -MAPS AND CIIAKTS. 

[ Our collection of maps and charts has increased gratify- 
1 ingly in size and value. In addition to our purchase of scv- 
I cral very rare and interesting old atlases and maps of Amcr- 
i ica, published in tlio ITth and ISth centuries, wo have 
i received a number of others by gift — most of them relating 
I to onr own State. "Wo arc endeavoring to complete our col- 
I lection on this State, and have nearly done so. Diligent 
watch is kept for every new Minnesota state, county or town 
map published. We have been generously aided in this 
i effort by the lithographic publishers of this city, Messrs. 
Reed & Monasch, and G. J. Eice, who have both contribu- 
ted copies of such maps as they have executed the past year. 
We have also received from M. IS". Kellogg 11 maps ; Gen. 
Hancock, 16; J. W. Prince, 1; Gen. Holabird, 2; Johnson 
& Robertson, 2; and from A. J. Hill, Richard Relf, C. 11. 
Dixon, and J. S. Loomis, 1 each. 
• 

THE CABINET. 

Our limited room has also greatly interfered with another 
department of our collection, viz.: flic Historical Cabinet. 
Still, we have received a number of valuable curiosities. 
Henry S. Back contributes 10 Fpccimena of mineralogy, 
from the Cottonwood and Pipe Stone region ; Ca])t. J. K. 
Arnold, a curiously worked eaddlc-bags, captured from the 
Picgans in Montana, and James J. Hill, an ornamented 
buckskin garment, made by the Manitoba Indians, and worn 
by one of the principal chiefs in that province. From ^faj. 
A. n. Sibley wo- have rcceiveil a beautiful nugget of quartz 
j • from the celebrated ^ilver Island of Lako Superior, and 
from Col. John P. Owens, of Taylor's Falls, a fragment of 
remarkably pure copper, dug up from a street in that town. 



JfiJincsota Historical Society* 11 

N. F. Earncs, of St. Cloud, contributes two liistorical auto- 
graplis. Currency and coins liavc been received from Capt. 
Charles A. Smith, Anoka ; Geo. L. Onkes, St. Paul; C. C. 
Lowe, Lake City; Cai)t. A. Cutter, A'noka; Hon. A. Ram- 
sey, O. Dinsmorc, R J I. L. Jcwelt, Gov. AiiKtin, Orango 
King, and others. 

AnClI^OLOGT. , 

The progress of our archaeological investigations has nec- 
essarily been limited the past year. Still, some valuable 
facts have been developed. The following gentlemen have 
furnished us with written information concerning original 
earthworks: Wm. A. Smith, of the Is^ P. P. B. F. 
Christlieb, of Hennepin Co.; Dand McKenzie, ot St. Paul; 
and O. Jorgens, of Otter Tail Co. It was hoped tliat dur- 
ing the propress of the vigorous railroad building going on 
in our State, that many interesting relics would have been 
tinearthed, and found their way to our Cabinet, but in this 
wo liave been disappointed. "We hear of these aboriginal 
curiosities being found occasionally, but tliey arc generally 
secured by eastern tourists, or become lost in unaj)preciative 
hands. Two valuable implements have been presented to us 
the past year — from C. D. Dorr, of St. Anthony, a copper 
spear liead, found at that place, and from Eugenio A. John- 
ston, of St. Paul, a, stone hatchet, found in the upper part 
of this city. 

FINANCES. 

\ 

The Treasurer's books show the expenditures of the So- 
ciety the past year to be as follows : 

Printing .. $22.75 

Stationery 17.15 / 

Postage 44.88 

Freight and Express 58.17 

Miscellaneous 5.85 

Purchase of Books "750.75 

Binding 174.50 

Furniture 258.00 

Salary 1,200.00— Cs2,(i40. 55 



13 Annual Report. 

Tlio greatest cnro liaa been taken by ourcommittcofl eliargcd 
with tho oxpcndituro of tlio Lcf^Inlativo appropriation, to 
oxocuto tlio trust witli an eye solely to tho best and largest 
results, and in tliis wo beliovo they have succeeded admirably. 

RE-ISSUE or OUK COLI.IXTIONS. 

Tho first volumo of our Collections is now enfircly out of 
piint. AVo have not a single copy that can bo given away, 
wliile numerous requests are being made for it, from cojtcs. 
ponding societies and contributors. It comprises a large 
amount of valuable and interesting historical niatfer, and its 
re-issue seems to be a necessity. It would be of great value 
to us as an exchange, and in introducing our Society to no- 
tice abroad. As we have no means that can be applied to 
snch a purpose, wc respectfully suggest to the Legislature to 
Authorize the society to have the work executed by the State 
Printer, to be audited out of the general printing fund. 

ROOMS. 

AVe again most urgently call tho attention of the Legisla- 
ture to tho crowded condition of our rooms. AVo are nov; 
.seriously embarasscd in our operations from want of sufhcicnt 
room, and tho evil is daily gro\ving Avor.se. Some provision 
is urgently needed to remedy this trouble, and wo hopoinay 
bo nu\do at tho j)rescnt session. 

Tho subject of a suitable building for our own use is thus 
brought again to our attention. This we must have before 
many months, and the Society and its Iricjuls should be con- 
sidering, in a serious and deternn'ned manner, tho i)roblem 
as to how jueans to efiect the desired ei\(l may bo obtained. 
Various solutions have been olVered, but until some moro 
vigorous and determined action is taken by the Society, it is 
not likely that anything will be accomj)lishcd. 

OUR WORK FOR THi: l UTURK. 

If this desideratum Avero supplied, and presuming tliat we 
aro enabled to command means lor our current expenses, tho 
future success and progress of tho Society would be ensured. 
Wc arc now expected to perform a work greater and m.oro 



MinncsoCa Historical Society. 13 | 

extensive than wo uro prepared for, but look forward con- i 
fidently to the tiiuo when more fiivorablo eurroinidings may 
enable lis to fulfill tlic most sanguine expectations of our j 
friends in this respect. That we have demonstrated to the i 
most doubtful the importance, value and necessity of our J 
institution, none will now deny. By what other means or i 
ngency could the work wo havo done, been j^erformcd ? 
Wisely, indeed, was our institution founded, and with objects ! 
ccrtaiidy important enough to vindicate its claims to public 
confidence and support. The nnparalleled growth and ad- ; 
vancement of the Northwest, particularly of our own State, 
unmistakably devolved npon the men of to-day the duty of . 
taking active nnd successful means to procure a true record < 
of its past history. The races that once inhabited this region ; 
were rapidly disappearing, and all account of their religion, ( 
customs and history were fading away as rapidly, to bo soon ; 
lost unless recorded. The brave and daring pioneers of the 
Kortliwest, who explored its vast rivers and lakes, and first : 
traversed the great prairies and forests of our State, plant- ; 
ing the mission house or the trading post in those wilds, and i 
whose exploits, escapes, perils and achievicments constitute • 
the romantic period of our history, were becoming well nigh 
for;rottcn. While the no less interestini:: and wonderful 
events of the present generation — the settlement of the State, 
the peopling and tilling 6f our vast prairies and forests, the 
building of extensive railroads and other public works, and 
the marvellous rise of our towns and cities, with all the ; 
institutionsof the highest civilization, and whose rapid growth 
liave been unexampled in history — these would have been > 
lost, or so imperfectly recorded as to be useless to posterity, 
without some institution like this whose especial object it 
should be to collect and preserve those memorials. 

Such is our province, and our past success is an evidence 
that the trust confided to us has been rightly managed, in- 
spiring us with confidence to go on reaping the rewards of 
past labor, ^nd still with hope that the future will unfold 
enlarged usefulness and success. \ 



APPENDIX. 



LIST OF DONOKS— 1871. 



fltOM INDIVJDUALF. 

13ouml Volumes. Pnmphlols 



Gov Horace Austin, • • ' • 2 

Oov A O ArcliibiiKI, M;u\iloba, • - 4 

Wm iS Applcton. J{('st(M), • • 1 

llor W S Alrx.'indcr, UucincWia. • - 10 

}Ion .] T Avcrill. - - - D7 1 

Hon 11 1) Hnrron, AN'iishington, • • 1 

Ucr. C 1) IJMdIcc, Hoston. • - 7 

])vron A 13aUlwin, Cliiaigo, - . 1 

W T nrigham. ]}oslon, - - 1 

I)r Chas II lionr.lin:in, St. Paul, • - CO 

lion J IT li.ikcr, "Washington, • - 8 

Cnpt U niakcly, St. I'.-vul . - . i 

Alex lic^ir. lOstq. Winnipeg, • • 2 1 

]) F Clirisllicl), Louu^ Lake, • • 1 

linbcrt (Clarke, Cincinnati, • • 8 ' 35 

.7 n (^lianev. St. I'anl, • ' - -0 2 

CJco W Cli'iUl?. Phil:\, - - 3 - 

Charles A Cutter, l^oston, ... i 

Capt lT(>nrv A Cattle, St. Paul, • - 7 

Win S Coin I)"!, St P.nil. - - • I 1 

T Ai)nl{>on Cheney, Leon, N Y, - • 1 

Geo. Culver, St. Paul. • • -23 

i: V Drake, do. ... 2 

Charles II Dixon, do, . . . l i 

J Watts De Pejaler. Tivoli, NY. • 1 

Hon Isl 11 Dunncll, Conrrresf, • • 3 

lion O Dinsmorc, Hod AVing, • - - 1 

])r 1) C Eates Lake Citv, • • 1 

W W Fehvcll, St. Antiionv, - • ■ 

Rev Jamc3 II Fitl5>, Wc^t Boylston, >ras.% - 3 

IT P Forman, London, Eng., ' • 1 • . ■ 

Hon J O Fanshawe, do. • -1 3 

^V P Garrison, Ncav York, • • 1 

A T Goodman, Cleveland, • • C ' 

Dr Sim. A Green, Po.<5ton, • • iO 423 

O Gil)b?, Lake Citv, Minn., - • 2 

John N Genin, N Y, • • 1 

Dr Franklin B IIou[;h. Lnwville, NY, - 8 61 

Dr Otis Hovt, Hudson, Wis., • • 3 • 

Maj. Gen W S Hancock, USA, - -5 1 

Alfred J Hill, . . . n , 

James J Hill, - - • • 81 5 



Minnesota Illstorical Society. 



15 



Jolfti W. lliiinmcrplcy, N Y, 
(5c(> A lliunillon, Si I'nu), 
(}ov K I{ IIHVC5, Oliio, 
F A IIol(loii,'\Vnsliin.i,'ton,l) C, 
J)r I* li ll;ilcl), Miniiciipolifl, 
l)r J W ll')vt, M-ulison, Wis., 
Charles Henry JIart, Phila, ' • - 
JI A J.ickninn, StiliwaUT, 
Dr EJwnrd Jiirvi?, Dorchester, Mas?, 
John J. Knox, Washin;:ton, 
])r I A Laplinm, MihrMikec, 
]lcv J] li Lallirj)p, Pay neavillc, Minn, 
lion John S Tinonus, N Y, 
Col Hans I^Inltson, LilrliUeld, 
]icT Myron A 3lnnson, iNoitiifickl, 
Joel Munscll, Albany, N Y. 
Kcv .]ohn MiiUork?, bt. Paul, 
M C Mcigp, Qr jMastcr Gen. 
J V Munger, Sii^na! Purean, 
S l") !Max\Ycll, Cincinnati, 
A V IsMchols, Albanr, N. Y., 
JUv E \) ^'eill, I)ui)lin, 
Prof J L Noycs, Farib:uiU, 
O W Plnnilcy, Minneapolis, 
Geo II Preble, Charleston, Mass. 
]) II Pease, Nor\Talk,(). 
lion Alex Panisey, Coiifrrcsp, 
Dr Is;inc Smueker, Newark, I). 
A iStcbbins, i^nn Francisco, 
W HncNon Stci)hcn.'5, Lowvillc, N Y, 
G B Sicbbins,' Detroit, 
Ilobl. O Sweeny. .St Paul. 
Hon Jaine? Sh:nv, Mt. Carroll, Ills. 
Gen J II Simpson, AVasli'm^ion, 
Kov. J FTnUle, Crnw fonlsville, Ind. 
Alphoiis ToJil, Gltown, Canada, 
AUdison Villi iVanie. New Haven, Conn. 
J F Williams, St. Panl. 
lion U C Winthrop, lioston, 
C'Hpt J'phraini William'', Deerflcld, Muss 
prAshbc'l Woodward, I'Vanklin, Conn, 



Bound Volii-no;- 
1 



25 



rilO.M S0CIKTIE3 AND INSTITUTIONS. 

American Antiquarian Society, 
Department of Interior, AVashin.5;ton, 
lioston City lIo;^i)iial 
>Visconsin Historical Society 
l?n!Valo Hi-itorical Society 
^Maryland Historical Society, 
Swedish C'entral Ihircau of Statistics, 
Kssex Institute - ■ " - 

(^onnni'^sioner of Indian Aflaire, 
^Icrcantile Library Association, Cincinnati, O, 
Peabod^v Academy of St-iences. 
Jlcrcanlilc Library Associat ion. San Francisco, 
Conimi^'-ioner of Oeneral Land Olllcc, - • 12 

Iowa Hisl(^rical Society. - • \2 

Massachusetts Historical Society, • • U 

^lassac hu^etts Board of Sl ito 'ClmrlticR, - 1 
Atnericai\ Unitarian Association. 
Surrey Archaeological 8 )cicty, England, 



Pamphlota. 
8 



1 

10 
27 
1 
1 

18 

n 
1 

14 
31 
1 
1 
6 

1 
1 
1 

2 

• 2 
7 
4 
1 
2 
1 
4 
G 
1 
1 
8 
1 
3 
1 
1 

Q 



2 
1 
1 

11 

G 



12 
2 



\